Skip to main content

Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

See other formats


1958 



^maa/ Report 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
Massachusetts 



The Massachusetts Selectmen's Association 

PRESENTS 

^irdt IPrize 

IN THE SECOND POPULATION GROUP 

To the Town of 

WILMINGTON 

In Recognition of the Excellence of its 

TOWN REPORT 
For the Year 1957 



AND in witness thereof has caused its seal and the signatures of 
its President and Secretary to be affixed hereto at Lenox on the 
Tenth day of October, nineteen hundred and fifty-eight 




With a great deal of pleasure we announce that last year's annual town report 
was awarded FIRST PRIZE in the Massachusetts Selectmen's Town Report 
Contest. The second consecutive year we have received this award. 



The same report received Honorable Mention in the New England town report 
contest for all towns in New England of our population group. 



PREFACE 



The words, pictures and figures in this annual report tell 
the story of Wilmington's municipal government in 1958. 

Our Town is faced with the same municipal problem that 
confronts every community in Massachusetts, and every 
community throughout the country - the problem of pre- 
serving a fair and just balance between what the citizens 
want in the form of municipal services and what they can 
afford. 

The problem is complicated by the fact that a dollar will 
not buy, in services or commodities, as much as it used 
to buy. 

Honest, efficient government is the best agency for pre- 
serving this delicate balance between what we want and 
what we can afford. The integrity and efficiency of 
Wilmington's government is indicated by the fact that its 
tax rate, municipal services, and employees' salaries 
compare very favorably with those in comparable com- 
munitie s . 

It is hoped that the material included in this report will 
be of interest to the reader and inspire in him the desire 
to seek additional information on the operations of muni- 
cipal government. 

The employees of the town welcome the opportunity to 
provide information about any of the numerous services 
performed for the community. 

Oftentimes the lack of objective information leads to mis- 
understanding about the operation of our local government. 
Each citizen is urged to examine this report in its entirety 
so as to become familiar with the many activities in which 
the town is engaged. 



1 



ITEMS 



OF 



GENERAL INTEREST 



Year of Incorporation of the Town 



1730 



Town Manager Plan Adopted 



1951 



Area of the Town 



17. 08 sq. miles 



Town Roads 



70 Miles 



Town Water Mains 



56. 4 Mile s 



Real Estate Valuation 



Personal Property Valuation 



Population 



Registered Voters 



$18, 320, 125 
$908, 545 
11, 324 
4, 746 



Full time Town Employees 
(exclusive of School Dept. ) 



127 



U. S, Senators: 

U. S. Representative: 
State Senator: 

State Representatives: 



Leverett Saltonstall of Dover 
John Kennedy of Boston 

Edith Nourse Rogers of Lowell 

James Madden of Lexington 

7th Middlesex District 

20 Pemberton Square, Boston 

Frank Tanner 

18th Middlesex District 

26 Mineral Street, Reading 

Thomas Donahue 

18th Middlesex District 

75 Pine Street, Woburn 



2 



INDEX 



General Interest 

f Transmittal 
Selectmen - 1958 
s - 1958 
Ahead 

•y of Officials 
)riam - Francis S. Hoban 
anager 
F Selectmen 
Assessors 
)le 

reasurer 
oUector 
lerk 

ars of Voters 
By-Law Committee 
, J. Carter Lecture Fund 
Counsel 

E Cemetery Commissioners 
Board 
Department 
Department 
Defense 
nanent Building Committee 



Page 

1 Building Inspector 

2 Sealer of Weights and Measures 

3 Veterans Agent 

4 Board of Appeals 

5 Town Engineer 

6 Water Department 

7 Tree Warden 

8 Highway Department 

11 Board of Health 

12 Animal Inspector 

15 Dog Officer 

16 Board of Public Welfare 

18 School Maintenance Dept. 

19 Board of Library Trustees 

20 Recreation Commission 

22 Housing Authority 

23 Jury List 

23 Accepted Streets 

24 Special Town Mtg. , January 1958 

25 Annual Town Mtg., March 1958 

29 Special Town Mtg. , June 1958 

30 State Primary, Sept. 1958 

33 Special Town Mtg. , Sept. 1958 

36 State Election, Nov. 1958 

38 Warrant, Annual Town Mtg. , 1959 

40 Town Accountant 



Page 

44 

45 

46 

47 

50 

52 

54 

55 

59 

65 

65 

66 

68 

71 

76 

78 

80 

82 

89 

90 
102 
103 
107 
108 
1 1 3 
120 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

We herewith transmit the 1958 Annual Report of the Town of 
Wilmington for your appraisal and approval. 

The affairs of the Town are submitted in full detail and from 
this the citizenry may evaluate the quality of their government. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Board of Selectmen 

Francis J. Hagerty, Chairman 
Charles H. Black 
Wavie M. Drew 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Donald C. Kidder 



4 



progress 



WHAT WE DID IN 1958 
first new Shopping Center announced. 

industrial expansion continues with completion of Mystic Transformer Plant, 
completion of new 1,500,000 gal, capacity standpipe. 

over 3 miles of water mains added to town's water distribution system, 
completed second addition to High School at cost of over $380, 000.. 
contract awarded for first low cost, high quality school. 

further extension of fire alarm system and installation of control board completed, 
installation of first phase of town sewer system completed, 
detailed engineering plans for townwide sewer system completed, 
project to eliminate conflicting street names nears completion. 

over 26 miles of streets constructed or resurfaced in massive improvement ot town road system. 

completion of 3 high quality subdivisions under new revised subdivision regulations. 

master plan studies of park, playground and school needs near completion. 

revised and updated traffic rules and regulations. 

adopted realistic taxi regulations. 

adopted regulations governing Fire Department. 

1957 town report awarded first prize in statewide competition. 

improved dangerous intersection of Wildwood and Woburn Streets. 

expanded traffic supervisor program for guarding school crossings. 

reconstructed and widened Park Street and completed Lowell Street deceleration lane, 
reconstruction of Town Common started. 



6 



the job ahead 



WHAT WE PLAN FOR THE? FUTURE 



intensify efforts to attract new industry. 

reconstruct and widen Federal Street and Concord Street, 
initiate plans for increased curbing and sidewalk program, 
initiate plans and procedure to correct street drainage problems, 
continue our expanded street program. 

adopt personnel by-law to insure continuance of equality of treatment for town employees. 

adopt favorable legislation setting up Sewer Department. 

continue sewer system construction and expansion. 

adopt new building code in anticipation of expected growth. 

complete low cost and high quality Glen Road School by Septersiber 1959. 

mechanize town bookkeeping system. 

develop plans for expanded library services. 

develop plans for extension of public beach at Silver Lake. 

develop plans for public recreation area at Foster's Pond, 

increase facilities for public recreation at Town Park. 

complete landscaping of Town Common. 

develop plan for new Fire Sub-station. 

, construct Highway Garage to provide greater efficiency at reduced maintenance costs. 

.develop plans for new Town Hall facilities. 

. complete construction of new Police Station. 

.plan for maximum utilization of benefits of Interstate 93. 

. continue to improve water distribution system. 

• develop plans for acquisition and expansion of new wellfield site. 
. develop plans for needed additional off-street parking. 

7 



niRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - 1958 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Francis J. Hagerty, Chairman 

Wavie M. Drew 

Charles H. Black 

Donald C. Kidder 

Nicholas L. DeFelice 

Olive M. Sheldon, Clerk 



Term 
Expires 

1959 
1959 
I960 
1960 
1961 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Dudley A. Buck, Chairman 
Henry Sullivan 
Ernest M. Crispo 
John J. Hartnett 
Arthur V. Lynch 
Edward F. Page 



TOWN MODERATOR 
Simon Cutter 
(elected annually) 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
John J, Collins 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Leo E. Le Blanc 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Minot J. Anderson 

CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 
Ernest W. Fames 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Rene J. LaRivee 

CONSTABLE 

Harry J. Ainsworth 
A. John Imbimbo 



DOG OFFICER 

Leo E. LeBlanc 

FIRE CHIEF 

Arthur J. Boudreau 

HEALTH AGT. &SANITARIAN 
Patrick A. Thibeau 

HIGHWAY SUPT. 
James H. White 

LIBRARIAN 

Clara P. Chipman 

MEDICAL AGT. , BD. HEALTH 
Gerald A. Fagan, M.D. 



MILK INSPECTOR 

Patrick A. Thibeau 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 
John W. Babine 

NURSE, PUBLIC HEALTH 
Ann Butters, R.N. 

NURSE, SCHOOL 

Esther H. Nichols, R.N. 

PHYSICIAN, SCHOOLS 

Ernest C. MacDougall, M.D. 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Herbert W. Pickering 

POLICE CHIEF 
Paul J. Lynch 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 
Joseph F. Lyons 
A. L. Osterman 
Wilbur T. Stave ley 

SEALER WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Daniel P. Pike 

SLAUGHTERING INSPECTOR 
Leo E. LeBlanc 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Robert H. Peters 



Term 
Expires 

1961 
1961 

1960 
I960 
1959 
1959 




TOWN CLERK 

Esther L. Russell 

ASST. TOWN CLERK 
Sylvia L. Stanley 

TOWN COLLECTOR 
Miriam H. Ware 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Philip B. Buzzell 

TOWN ENGINEER 

George F. Maynard 

TOWN TREASURER 
Grace H. Tilley 

TREE WARDEN 
John W. Babine 

VETERANS' AGENT 

Frederick H. Horton 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 
Guy E. Nichols 

WATER SUPERINTENDENT 
Edmund H. Sargent 

WELFARE AGENT 
Andrew P. Ring 

WIRE INSPECTOR 

Charles L. Webster 



8 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS 



>PEAL, BOARD OF 
Walter L. Hale, Jr. , Chairman 
A. Lloyd Laiffin 
Louis E. Gage 

Almerico T. DiCampo (Associate) 
Walter A. Lawler (Associate) 
Anthony Joannides (Associate) 

;SESSORS, BOARD OF 
Alfred Calabrese, Principal Assessor 
Stanley Webber, Principal Assessor 
Olive M. Sheldon 
Minot J. Anderson 

lRTER lecture fund COMMITTEE 
Madelon C. Slater 
Alice M. Allen 
Guy E. Nichols 
Mildred F. Neilson 
Helen P. Hayward 

:METFRY COMMISSIONERS 
Joseph B. McMahon 
Guy F. Nichols, Chairman 
William F. Cavanaugh 

NANCE COMMITTEE 
Herbert C. Barrows, Chairman 
John G. Hayward 
Stanley Webber (resigned) 
John Brooks 
Ralph M. Kelmon 
Robert B. Michelson 
Frank P, Stevens 
William P. Curtin, Secretary 
Cornelius F. Joyce 
William A. Stickney 

:ALTH, BOARD OF 
Augustus C. Walker, Chairman 
Marion C. Boylen 
Vinal E. Lewis 

)USING AUTHORITY 
Alan E. Fenton, State Member 
William F. Smith, Chairman 
Ernest B. Rice 
Frank H. McLean 
Frank P. Leavitt 

Kenneth Howard Neagle (resigned) 



Term Term 

Expires Expires 
LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

1959 May Hadley 1959 

1960 Esther B. Hall 1959 

1961 Philip B. Buzzell i960 
1959 Elizabeth N. Neilson 196O 
1959 Frankline E. Allen, Chairman 1961 
I960 



PLANNING BOARD 
(resigned) A. Daniel Gillis, Secretary 1959 

William K. Irwin I960 
John R. Evans I960 
Claude W. Helwig 1961 
John P. Tobey, Chairman 1962 
Howard C. Woolaver 1962 

1959 William A. Beers 1963 

1960 

1961 

1962 RECREATION COMMISSION 

1963 Maybelle A. Bliss, Chairman 
Lawrence H. Gushing, Director 
Carl A. Backman 

1959 Edward M. Nichols 

1960 Norbert L, Sell 

1961 David I. Elf man 



1959 REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

1959 Phyllis O'Leary 1959 

1959 F. Talbot Emery I960 

1959 Joseph P, Ring, Chairman I96I 

1960 Esther L. Russell, Clerk 
I960 

1960 

1961 TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

1961 Edward M. Neilson 1959 

1961 Philip B. Buzzell, Chairman I960 
Harold E. Melzar 1961 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. BOARD OF 

Ralph G. Babcock (resigned) 1959 
Arnold C. Blake 1959 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman I960 

1963 Waldo A. Stevens 

1961 

I960 

1963 WELFARE, BOARD OF PUBLIC 

1959 Florence A. Balkus 

1962 Maurice D. O'Neil, Chairman 

Anna M. Low 1961 



9 



TOWN COMMITTEES 



Fire Alarm System Committee 

Arthur J. Boudreau, Chairman 
Adrian A. Durkee 

Alden N. Eames 

John E. Murphy 

Edward F. Page 

Edward J. Sullivan 

John H. Tautges 



High School Building Committe e 

Fred T. Corum, Chairman 

Earle S. Hamilton 

J. Parker Prindle 

John Tautges 

Basil L. Weatherbee 



Permanent Building Committee 

^Term 

Exp ireg i 

Erwin Hanke, Chairman 
Paul H. Niles 
Raymond G. McClure 
Vincent R. McLain 
Joseph F. Courtney 



I960 
I960 
1961 
1961 
1959 



i 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES TO THE TOWN MANAGER 



Building By-Law Committee 

Roland Woods, Chairman 
E. Hayward Bliss 
Ray Fitzmaurice 
Garnet Mills 



I nsurance Advisory Committe e^ 

Robert W. Gunderson, Chairman 
Augustus T. Norton 
Joseph J. Slater 
Howard A. Woolaver 



P ersonnel Advisory Committee 

Stanley Webber, Chairman 
Doris C. Cady 
Frank P. Stevens 



10 



1ft Memor'um 



Wilmington was saddened the latter part of 1958 by the 
death of Francis S. Hoban who served the Police Department 
faithfully over a period of almost thirty years. Appointed to 
the Police Department in 1929, Officer Hoban became Deputy 
Chief in April of 1940. 



Highlighted in his career was the holdup of the Wilmington 
branch of the Mechanics Savings Bank. Deputy Chief Hoban' s 
outstanding police work in this case won him statewide 
recognition. 



Wilmington will long remember this "Protector of Persons 
and Property". 



11 



town manager 





To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the activities of the various departments for the year 
ending December 31. 1958. and which concludes the 7th year of operation under the Manager form of goverr 
ment. jj 

The year 1958 was one of continued growth and expansion. The prestige, credit and reputation 
the town stand higher than ever before. We are prepared to meet directly and aggressively, the challenge 
and opportunity of our continued steady growth. 

It is my firm belief that the past five years (the years with which 1 am personally familiar) under 
the Manager form of government, have represented a period of outstanding expansion and development xn th 
history of the Town of Wilmington. 

Statistical data reveals a most remarkable expansion and diversification of our industrial econoix 
Many new job opportunities have become available to our citizens. Annual industrial wages have -crease,» 
a remarkable degree and the increase has exceeded that of many of the communities of the Commonwealtt 

During this same period your town government has made excellent progress in modernizing gove. 
mental operations, in providing more and better public services and at the same time lowering unit costs. 

Wilmington is enjoying an unprecedented era of prestige and popularity which attests to the thougj 
ful and aggressive leadership it has enjoyed in these past years, both in its elected and appointed officials, 
and in its various civic organizations. 

This record of achievement and continued progress is conclusive evidence of the cooperative spil 
which has been developed among your selectmen, merchants and industrialists, town employees, town com- 
mittees and citizens of Wilmington. 

Much has been accomplished but much more remains to be done. The continuation of this co- 
operative attitude is essential if we are to successfully meet the competitive challenges that lie ahead. 



12 



It is important that the town resist any temptation to lower the standards that have enabled us to 
reach our posxtxon of stab.hty and leadership. We must be constantly on the alert to guard against those 
TuZT '° ^'^^^"^^ advantages of the town contrary to thl geLral 

1 u'T 7"P^^',*° finances, when we consider the fact that approximately one third (1/3) or less of 
the annual budget xs subject to the effective control of the selectmen and town manager, it is gratifying that 
;:t muTfal^re fa1:7h:^ stability that ma.es the community attractive to .n'dustry an^ homLler . 
Bu we must face the fact that our expenditures can only increase in proportion to our "ability to pav" or we 
c7n in" th" insolvency that faces so many of our neighboring communities ' We'cLno Tong 

continue the practice of limiting the expenditures of those departments under L control of the selecZn and 

re™cr;taM:r""^^"" " ^° ^ ^^--^ - .ztrrsoT 

While Wilmington shares with all other communities the problem of increasing, <.rhnr.^ , 
whi e ie is fervently hoped that some relief will be provided by proposalsTow berre he^^^^^^^^^ 
theless IS a fact tha the competition between schools and all other town departments has forced the sub 
mission of budgets for town services based upon - what is essential - rather than - whlt is desirabl e . 

While the foregoing is not intended as a criticism, we may nevertheless have reached the point 
for many of our homeowners, where even a "slight- increase in our tax rate and our tax bills ilposes an 
almost impossible strain on a family budget already stretched to the limit. We have reached t^ point where 
we must consider not only the extent of the services we are to provide, but also we must coL^derTe patient 
and long suffering taxpayer who is paying the bills. consiaer the patient 

Perhaps one of the most significant steps taken in 1958. to meet the ever present threat of rising 

po IbTe'at r 1 ^^'^^^^r^i^" °^ I^-d School which demonstrated that "good" schools are ' 

possible at construction cost levels within our "ability to pay". scnoois are 

rr^AA. ^"^^^l^^ important an accomplishment, though less spectacular, has been the increased demands 

in any prior year in our recent history. "lore miies oi roads than 

Substantial amounts of new equipment were niirr-hacori ,i,in, , r , : 

fur departments to provide more eff icient'and ecZmfcal L^L '^^'"^^^'^^ '''''''' °^ ^ 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alfred Calabrese 
Town Manager 



0- 

I! 



i; 

c 



13 



WILMINGTONS 1958 BUDGET 




Includes - Prelection of Persons a Properly, Public Works, 

General Govt., Health a Sanitation, Library a Recr. 



TAX RATE ANALYSIS 



Assessed Valuation 
Tax Levy 
Tax Rate 



1950 

^ 865,913.00 
440,491. 13 
56. 00 



1954 

1 1,733, 065. 00 
668, 784. 70 
57. 00 



1955 

1 3, 248, 383. 00 
741, 909. 45 
56. 00 



1956 

15, 341, 686. 00 
895, 593. 73 
58. 00 



1957 

16, 774, 982. 00 
1, 059, 522. 87 
62. 80 



1958 

19,228, 670. 
1, 275, 344. 

66. 



Net Cost from Taxes 
Schools 

Town Government 
State, County Agencie s 

TOTAL TAX LEVY 

School Tax Rate 

Town Tax Rate 

State, County Tax Rate 



135, 293.70 
275, 723.43 
28, 474. 00 

440,491. 13 

$17. 20 (30. 7%) 
35. 20 (63. 0%) 
3. 60 ( 6. 3%) 



289, 597. 08 
. 359, 056. 96 
20, 130. 66 

668, 784 70 

$24. 69 (43. 3%) 
30. 53 (53. 6%) 
1. 78 ( 3. 1%) 



355, 530. 99 
367, 005. 03 
19. 373. 43 



469, 616. 09 
405, 782. 67 
20, 194. 98 



585,822. 89 
447, 569. 02 
26, 130. 96 



650. 711. 
599, 247. 
25, 385. 



741,909.45 895,593.73 1,059,522.87 1,275,344 

$26.83 (47.9%) $30.61 (52.3%) $34.75 (55.0%) $33. 68 (51. 

27.72 (49.5%) 26.07 (45.9%) 26,50 (42.6%) 31.01(46. 

1.45 ( 2.6%) 1. 32 ( 2.3%) 1. 55 ( 2.4%) 1. 31 ( 1, 



TOTAL TAX RATE 56.00 



57. 00 



56. 00 



58.00 



62. 80 



66. 00 



14 



board of selectmen 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

Herewith is presented the Annual Report of your Board of Selectmen for the year ended December 31, 1958. 

Following the re-election of Nicholas L. DeFelice, the Board was organized with Francis Hagerty as Chairma.i. 

Due to the amount of government activity it was necessary for the Board to conduct an unusually large number 
of special meetings in addition to attending Public Hearings on many matters of importance. 

On February 17, 1958, Town Manager Joseph F. Courtney submitted his resignation to be effective on 
March 22, 1958. Alfred Calabrese was appointed Temporary Town Manager on March 22, 1958. 

After having interviewed many candidates from various parts of the country, the Board elected Mr. Calabrese 
as Town Manager on July 7, 1958 for a term of three years. 

The following actions of the Board are directed to the attention of the townspeople: 

Adopted additional Traffic Regulations for the further protection of pedestrians i 
and motorists. J) 

Voted to install Traffic Control Signals at the location of the Old Age Housing Project. 'A 

Negotiated a Sewerage Disposal Contract with the Avco Manufacturing Corporation. ;J 

Initiated the procedure which resulted in the North Wilmington Post Office being 

made a sub-station of the Wilmington Post Office. Cjj 

t* 

Adopted Rules and Regulations for Fire Department personnel. : 
Adopted a policy for the assessment of Betterments on corner lots. j 
Adopted Rules and Regulations for Taxi Businesses and Taxi Operators. 
Appointed the first Permanent Building Committee. 

Appeared at the State House on many occasions to represent the interests of the Town. 

To give us the tax base necessary to meet the cost of future educational facilities, we must maintain a high 
i^uality of government, improve the physical appearance of our community and do all that is possible to make 
;he Town attractive to business and industry. 

We express our appreciation to the Town Manager and all town employees for their devotion to duty and 
:ontinued cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Francis J. Hagerty, Chairman 
Charles H. Black 
Wavie M. Drew 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Donald C. Kidder 



15 



board of assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1958 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 


$1, 597, 199. 


75 


Total Appropriations {Available Funds) 


64, 916. 


60 


Tax Title Foreclosures 


144, 


00 


Debt and Interest Charges (Matured) 


5. 670. 


17 


Amount necessary to satisfy final court judgments 


150. 


00 


Overlay Deficits (Overdrafts) 


18, 017. 


87 


Total Deficits (Abatements) 


13, 896. 


62 


Pension Fund 


15, 127, 


85 


State Parks and Reservations 


3, 853. 


13 


State Audit 


78, 


47 


County Tax 


17, 605. 


94 


Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 


3, 848, 


02 


Overlay 


44, 312. 


24 



1, 662, 116, 35 



Gross Amount to be Raised 



122, 704, 31 
1, 784, 820. bi 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 






Income Tax 


128, 408. 


95 


Corporation Taxes 


15, 405. 


79 


Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 


60. 


25 


Old Age Tax (Meals) 


1, 867. 


20 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


108, 000. 


00 


License s 


4, 000. 


00 


Special Assessments 


5, 500. 


00 


General Government 


6, 000. 


00 


Protection of Persons and Property 


5, 000. 


00 


Health and Sanitation 


2, 400. 


00 


Char itie s 


21, 700. 


00 


Old Age Assistance 


34, 800. 


00 


Veterans' Services 


8, 700. 


00 


Schools 


35, 000. 


00 


Librarie s 


400. 


00 


Ceme teries 


3, 000. 


00 


Interest on Taxes and Assessments 


4, 200. 


00 


State Assistance for School Construction 


57, 347. 


00 


Farm Animal Excise 


240. 


00 


Unclassified 


. 1,900. 


00 


Total Estimated Receipts 






Overestimates of previous year (County Hospital Assessment) 


630. 


65 


Voted from Available Funds 


64, 916. 


60 



Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 
Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



Personal Property 908, 545 @ 66. 00 per M 

Real Estate 18, 320, 125 @ 66. 00 per M 

Polls - 3126 @ 2. 00 each 

Total Taxes Levied on Polls and Property 



443, 929. 1« 



65, 547. 25 
509, 476. 44 
1, 275, 344. 22 
1, 784, 820. 66 

59, 963. 97 
1, 209, 128. 25 
6, 252. 00 
1, 275, 344. 22 



16 




TABLE OF AGGREGATES FOR WILMINGTON 
OF POLLS, PROPERTY AND TAXES, AS ASSESSED 
JANUARY 1, 1958 



Compiled from the figures entered in the Valuation List: 

Number of Persons Assessed: 
On Personal Estate Only 
On Real Estate Only 
On Both Personal and Real Estate 
Total Number of Persons Assessed 
Total Number of Polls Assessed 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate: 
Stock in Trade 
Machinery 
Live Stock 

All Other Tangible Personal Property 
Total Value of Assessed Personal Property 
Value of Assessed Real Estate: 



Individuals 
23 
3766 
202 



Land Exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings Exclusive of Land 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Total Value of Assessed Estate 

Tax Rate per $1, 000 - $66, 00 

Taxes for State, County and Town purposes, including Overlay: 
On Personal Estate 
On Real Estate 
On Polls 

Total Taxes Assessed 

Number of Live Stock E s timated under Sec. 36, Chapter 59: 
Horses (1 yr. old or over) 
Neat Cattle (1 year old or over) 

Cows (Milch) 
Bulls 2, Oxen 0, Yearlings: steers 2, heifers 24 
Swine (6 months old or over) 
Sheep (6 months old or over) 
Fowl 
All Other 

Number of Acres o f Land Assessed 

Number of Dwellings Assessed 



All 
Other s 
14 
93 
23 



Total 



37 

3, 859 
225 

4, 121 
3, 126 



76, 275. 00 
134, 330. 00 

43, 990. 00 
653, 950. 00 

908, 545. 00 



2, 740, 225. 00 
15 , 579, 900. 00 

18, 320, 125. 00 

19, 228, 670. 00 



59, 963. 97 
1, 209, 128. 25 
6, 252. 00 

1, 275, 344. 22 



65 

7 
28 

682 
9 

1, 135 
35, 787 

10, 669 

3, 263 



I 

If 



17 



TOWN OWNED PROPERTY 



Water Department - 243 acres of Land and Buildings 

Schools - Land and Buildings 

Parks and Playgrounds - 52 acres of Land 

Town Hall - 16, 120 sq. ft. Land and Building 

Library - Land and Building 

Cemetery - Land and Building 

Fire -Police Station - Land and Building 

Tree Warden and Moth Department - Land and Building 

Highway Department - Land and Building 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Welfare Department 

Engineering Department 

TOTAL 





Equipment 


Total 


$ 129,910 


$ 15,000 


$ 144,910 


2, 672, 250 


160, 000 


2, 832, 250 


36, 660 


1, 000 


37, 660 


25, 540 


12, 500 


38,040 


4, 860 


3, 000 


7, 860 


46, 660 


2, 000 


48, 660 


61, 800 


31, 700 


93, 500 


3, 680 


5, 500 


9, 180 


7, 280 


19, 500 


26, 780 




1, 300 


1, 300 




1, 100 


1, 100 




2, 500 


2, 500 


$2, 988, 640 


$255, 100 


$3, 243, 740 




PRINCIPAL ASSESSOR 
Stanley Webber 



5 



constable 



Town Manager 
Wilmington, Mass. 



I have posted Notices of Town Meetings and Town Warrants in accordance with the By-Laws of 

the Town of Wilmington also, served and posted notices for other departments for the Town of 

Wilmington. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Harry J. Ainsworth 
Constable of Wilmington 



18 



town treasurer 




TOWN TREASURER 
Mrs. Grace H. Tilley 



Cash in Treasury January 1, 1958 
Total Receipts 1958 

Less Payments by Treasury Warrant 
Cash in Treasury January 1, 1959 

Departmental Items of Interest 

Total Personnel 

Number of Treasury checks isisued 1958 

Collections - Blue Cros s /Shield 

Collections - Employees Insurance 

Collections - Employees Retirement 

(exclusive of School Teachers) 

Collections - Federal Income Tax 



i 438,179.98 
4 , 432, 279. 07 
4, 870, 459. 05 
4, 081, 643. 94 

i 788,815.1 1 



415 

23, 802 
$ 13, 610. 35 
1, 444. 68 
21, 123. 58 

$116, 021. 67 



I 

n 

t:' 
osi 
>' 
t" 
c 



May I take this opportunity to thank the heads of all departments and the town employees for their 
1:oope ration. During my eleven years as Town Treasurer I have enjoyed the friendship and loyalty of the 
iown employees, for which I am deeply grateful. Serving them makes the personnel work a pleasure. I look 
liorward to 1959 with a sincere desire to serve. 



19 



town collector 




COMMITMENTS IN 1957 

1956 Excise in 1957 

1957 Excise 
Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Poll 

Farm Excise 
Water Liens 
Water Betterment 
Street Betterment 

Total Commitments 



$ 17,246.91 
1 12, 188. 41 
995, 198. 81 
56, 560. 82 
6, 052. 00 
232. 60 
2, 902. 36 
29, 179. 80 
28, 418. 31 

$1, 247, 980. 02 



1957 
1958 



COMMITMENTS IN 1958 




Excise in 1958 $ 


14, 502. 8f 


Excise 


1 30, 157. 5.' 


Real Estace 


1, 209, 252. OC 


Personal Property- 


61, 013. 3' 


Poll 


6,278. 0( 


Farm Excise 


247. 7: 


Water Liens 


4, 854. 31 


Apport. Water Betterment 


1, 387. 3^^ 


Apport. Water Betterment Int. 


827. 6] 


App. Water Btrmt. Int. (Deferrals) 


41. li 


Water Betterment 


32, 955. 0] 


Apport. Street Betterment 


1.299. 2] 


Apport. Street Betterment Int. 


965. 8( 


App. St. Btrmt. Paid in Advance 


2, 133. 6'; 


App. St. Btrmt. Int. Pd. in advance 


8. 6] 


Total Commitments $1, 465, 924. 2f 



1955 
Excise 



Balance 
12/31/57 

27. 35 



1958 
Commitment 



Cash 
Collected 



Balanc 

Abatements Refunds 12/31/ 



27. 35 



1956 
Poll 

Personal 
Excise 
Real Estate 
Water Liens 

1957 
Poll 

Pe r sonal 
Excise 
Real Estate 
Real Est. add. 
Water Liens 
Water Better. 
Street Better. 



12. 00 
148. 77 

864. 72 
6. 797. 19 
127. 72 



98. 00 
4, 614. 23 
24, 723. 94 
79, 871. 38 
1, 029. 60 
610. 18 
(see below) 
(see below) 



14, 502. 85 



2. 00 
44. 95 
419. 54 
3, 243. 50 
107. 45 



36. 00 
3, 469. 70 
35, 376. 30 

66, 280. 32 
509. 18 



6. 00 
103. 82 
(161. 28-169. 83 resc. ) 



2, 320, 74 



3, 646. 95 
9. 00 



271. 70 



2. 90 



22. 00 
395. 64 
2,625.99 1,001.82 

2, 844.30 1,561.98 
15. 00 



453. 
964, 
20. 



40, I 
748, 
2, 226. 

9,691. 
107. i| 



1958 
Poll 

Personal 
Excise 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 
Water Liens 

TOTAL 



6, 278. 00 
61, 013. 37 
130, 157. 55 
1, 209, 252. 00 
247. 73 
4, 854. 31 



5, 112. 00 
55, 299. 89 
101, 386. 76 
1, 084, 974. 26 
210. 28 
3, 658. 41 



6, 035. 70 



100. 03 



970. 00 
814. 1 1 
12, 661. 93 
50, 490. 82 

90. 14 



6. 00 
45. 68 
3, 751. 12 
8, 292. 94 



202. ' 
4, 945. 
19, 859. 'j 
76, 044. •( 
37. ' 
1, 005. '> 



1 18,925.08 1,426,1:05.81 1,360,130.54 12,112.42 71,315.25 14,677.44 1 16,350, 



20 



Unapportioned 
Balance s 
12/31/57 

WATER 

BETTERMENTS: 



1958 
Commit- 
ments 



$25, 823. 61 
Commitment 

4/23/58 
Apportioned 

added to 

tax bills 
Interest 
Interest on 

Deferrals 



32, 955. 01 



1, 387, 34 
827. 61 

41. 16 



Apport. 

Collected Cash Tax 
in advance Collected Title 



2, 359. 87 
2, 086. 00 



1, 016. 15 60. 25 
573. 13 2. 40 

9. 64 



Apport. Abate - 
Commit, ments 



Refunds Deferrals Balanr;e 



1,387.34 1,781.27 48.20 1,029.36 



2, 549. 25 



3, 954. 52 



19, 313. 97 
24, 365. 24 



310. 94 
252. 08 



31. 52 



STREET 

BETTERMENTS: 

$25, 352. 31 
Apportioned 

added to 

tax bills 
Interest 
Apport. Int, 
■ paid in 

advance 



1, 299. 21 
965. 86 



8. 61 



2, 133. 67 



566. 43 



845. 99 
630. 53 



8. 61 



1. 299. 21 



801. 03 



35. 90 
14. 88 



5. 00 
4. 05 



$51,175.92 37,484.80 2,133.67 8,096.35 62.65 2,686.55 5,182.33 57.25 4,983. 

Miscellaneous Collections: 



20, 551. 97 



422. 32 
324. 50 



65, 572. 54 



[nterests & Costs 
Lien Certificates 
l^dvertising Reimbursements 



$4, 1 16. 66 
657. 00 
22. 00 
$4, 845. 66 



TOWN COLLECTOR 
Mrs. Miriam H. Ware 




I 

A 

a 

J I 



0- 
U 

5. J 
c 



21 



town clerk 



TOWN CLERK 
Mrs. Esther L. Russell 




Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 

Births actually recorded to date in 1958 are three hundred one (301), 
This figure will be increased when final reports are in. 

Marriages recorded for 1958 were one hundred five (105). 

Deaths recorded for 1958 were ninety-four (94). 

Chapter 48, Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, midwives and 
physicians applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required 
by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45: 



Forty-eight (48) burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as 
Special Agent for the Board of Health. 



Town Records: 



Permits and Certificates of registration for the storage of inflammables - 
These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or 
by the holder of the license in the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 
of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 15 each year. If 
not registered as required by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing 
authority, after a public hearing. 



22 



Town Records: 



Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 480 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations l6l 

Dog Licenses Issued 1053 

Fish & Game Licenses Issued 571 

Three kennel licenses were issued in 1958. No kennel licenses are being 
issued without an affidavit that such kennel will not be operated as a business. 



registrars of voters 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Regis- 
trars are held on the second Monday of each month for registration and the conduct of business. Under ' 
Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press and is so posted in the i 

Town Hall. ;! 

!J1 

J.' 

Women married prior to January 1, must re -register under their marriage name. Naturalized 
citizens must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. H 

\] 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take resi- j5 
dence in the town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention j'j 
of the Board so that your name will not be removed from the voting list in error. 

On November 4, 1958 there were four thousand seven hundred and forty-six (4,746) registered »» 
voters in the town. ^ 

On January 1, 1958 the census showed a total population of eleven thousand three hundred and ^ 
twenty-four (11, 324) inhabitants. 



Building Br-Law Committee 



A new building code for the Town of Wilmington, encompassing the latest methods and materials 
of construction, is expected to be ready for Town approval this spring. The Building By-Law Committee for 
:he past two years, while formulating this code, has been studying codes of various municipalities through- 
out the country and recommendations of numerous agencies such as real estate and insurance groups, 
ingineering committees and housing research organizations. The result is a modern, up-to-date code which 
i'ill ensure the Town of Wilmington of sound, economical construction during its future growth. 



23 



sarah d. i. carter lecture fulid 



I 

A capacity audience filled the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Saturday evening, November 15, 
when the Carter Lecture Committee presented to the people of Wilmington, Captain Irving Johnson with the 
travelogue of his latest around-the -world voyage on the Schooner Yankee, The program was an excellent one 
and was enjoyed by all who attended. 

Because funds are limited and the costs of good programs so high today, the committee has felt 
it is wise to concentrate on quality rather than quantity in planning programs. Any suggestions for future 
programs that might be of interest to the townspeople will be welcome by the committee. 



Treasurer's Report 



Receipts: 

Cash on Hand 1/1/58 
Interest 

Received from Town Treasurer 



Balance on Hand 1/1/59 



$ 21. 04 
. 32 
346. 00 
367. 36 

$ 22.26 



Expenditure s : 

Howard Higgins 

Janitor 

Police 

Advertising 

Five bank checks 



$300. 00 
10. 00 
7. 50 
27. 00 

^0 

$345. 10 




town counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town 
Counsel covering the year 1958. 

A. On January 1. 1958, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (ex- 
clusive of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and 
of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court): 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover the sum of $275.96 for special vocational training of certain pupils.) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $657. 77 plus interest for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $721.90 for aid furnished in a public welfare case.) 

I 

Town of Wilmington v. A Certain Defendant, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action > 
of contract under G. L. Chap. 117, Sec. 5.) j 

Jacob Levine & Sons v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action ■'J 
of contract to recover burial expense. ) ]\ 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als. Commissioners of Department of Public Utili- 
ties and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk County. (Petition to review :, 
certain rulings and orders of the Department of Public Utilities in connection with protection at the Middle- 
sex Avenue Grade Crossing of the Boston and Maine Railroad.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Julia Godzyk, Administratrix of the Estate of Andrew Klebasz, Fourth 
District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action of contract to recover amounts expended by the Town for 
support and hospital treatment of decedent. ) 

Marion J. Murphy v. Ernest Rice, Sr. , Bldg. Inspector et el, Middlesex Superior Court. (Equity 
appeal to review the action by the Board of Appeal in denying a variance under the Zoning By-Law requested 
by the petitioner. 

Town of Wilmington v. Wendell Phillips, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obliga- 
tion to support. ) 

Elizabeth F. Green v. Town of Wilmington and other defendants, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Action of tort for personal injuries alleged to have been sustained as a result of a defect in Shawsheen Ave. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Irving L. White, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obliga- 
tion to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Otto George Von Rosenbe rg -De LaMar re , Executor of the will of Gamaliel 
Washb urn, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enforce statutory lien for old age assistance pay- 
Iments. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Otto George VonRosenberg-DeLaMarre, Executor of the will of Gamaliel 
Washburn, Middlesex Superior Cour t. (Action of contract to recover for old age assistance not included in 
the statutory lien.) 



25 




City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court. (New action of contract to recover 
for aid rendered various persons whose legal settlement is supposed to be in Wilmington.) 

Marilyn Ann Gilbert and Charles Gilbert v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Action of tort to recover for sidewalk injury, ) 

Robert J. Moran v. Mary E. Gilligan, Town Clerk, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for writ 
of mandamus to compel issuance of kennel license.) 

Samuel Missel d. b.a. Chelsea Cement Co. v. Town of Wilmington et als, Suffolk Superior Court. 
(Petition in equity to enforce statutory lien for materials and labor furnished one of the sub -contractor s on 
the high school extension. ) 

Towne Land Development, Inc. v. Wilmington Planning Board, Middlesex Superior Court. (Appea 
in equity from action of Planning Board disapproving a proposed sub -division. Complaint entered in Court 
but no subpoena served on Town. ) 

Bernard "Buster" Atkins v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to recover land sold for taxes. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Percy G. Crocker, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin re 
moval of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Nathan Ribock, Middlesex Superior Court, (Bill in equity to enjoin viola- 
tion of building laws,) 

Town of Wilmington v. Lawrence T, Sidelinker, Middlesex Superior Court, (Bill in equity to en- 
join maintenance of kennel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v, Anthony Signore, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin re- 
moval of loam. ) 

Town of Wilmington v, Arthur McCormick, Jr, , Administrator of the Estate of Natalie Giroux, 
(Bill in equity to enforce statutory lien for old age assistance payments. ) 

Wilmington Board of Health v. Nagel Stone, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
occupancy of substandard dwelling. ) 

Percy G. Crocker v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court. (Appeal from refusal of 
approval, gravel permit. ) 

Percy G. Crocker v. Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court, (Bill in equity to restrain 
interference with gravel removal, ) 

Elizabeth Gray v. Town of Wilmington et al. Middlesex Superior Court. (Action of tort to re- 
cover for highway injury. ) 

Lowell Cranberry Company v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court, (Action of tort to 
recover damages for alleged interference with drainage,) 

Town of Wilmington v, Joseph DeCota, Jr, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex, (Pro- 
ceeding to enforce obligation to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v, William Rich et al, Middlesex Superior Court, (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel, ) 



26 



New England Gas Products Inc. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. (Two separate 
appeals from refusal of building permit. ) 

John F. Hartnett et als v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition in equity by 
ten taxpayers to compel the making of additional school appropriations by the Town. ) 

Harry E. Wood v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for damages for 
taking of property for standpipe. ) 

B. (1) During the year 1958 the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v, Allstate Sand & Gravel Co. Inc. , Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allstate Sand & Gravel Co. and Pleasant Homes, Inc. Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Henry Mastromarino et al. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway, et als. Middlesex Superior Court. ^Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
assessment of damages in taking for state highway. 

Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington vs. Edward G. Moody & Sons, Inc. et als. Fourth District 
Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action to recover amounts paid for repair of brush fire truck.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Thomas H. Noyes, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Bill of 
complaint to enforce obligation to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Estate of Joseph Shebany, Middlesex Probate Court. (Claim for expenses 
incurred by Board of Health and Dog Officer. ) 

Town of Wilmington vs. Frederick & Ethel Smith et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Alice C. and William A. Dias and Campanella & Cardi Construction Co. 
Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington vs. James F. Donahue et al. Land Court. (Proceeding 
to secure verification of Planning Board's action in rescinding approval of part of subdivision plan. ) 

Town of Wilmington vs. Estate of William E. Connolly, Middlesex Superior Court. (Equity 
petition to enforce statutory lien for old age assistance. ) 

B. (2) During the year 1958 the following new actions were brought against the Town or its 
officers or Agents: 

Paul Bongiorno et ux v. County of Middlesex and Town of Wilmington. Middlesex Superior Court. 
[Petition for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Edward G. Moody & Son Inc. v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Arthur j. Boudreau & Fred F. 
3ain, Inc. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action to recover for repairs to brush fire truck. ) 



27 



II 




Wright & Pierce v. Town of Wilmington, United States District Court. (Action for breach of 



contract. ) 



James P. Donahue et al v. A. Daniel Gillis. Middlesex Superior Court. (Actions for damages to 
recover for lost profits on sales of land because of action of Planning Board.) 

Doris Weinstein v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assessment of 
damages for taking of land near North Wilmington Station for public parking area. ) 

C. During the year 1958 the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: 

Marilyn Ann Gilbert and Charles Gilbert v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Action of tort to recover for sidewalk injury. ) Disposed of by agreement for judgment and payment by 
Town of $300, 



City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court. (Action of contract to recover fog 
aid rendered various persons whose legal settlement is supposed to be in Wilmington.) Disposed of by 
agreement for neither party, and payment by Town of $206. 



i 



Bernard "Buster" Atkins v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to recover land sold for taxes. ) Disposed of by agreement and final decree entered. 

Town of Wilmington v. Lawrence T. Sidelinker, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin maintenance of kennel.) Final decree enjoining maintenance of kennel entered in 1957, omitted by 
error from previous report. 

Samuel Missel d.b.a, Chelsea Cement Co. v. Town of Wilmington et als, Suffolk Superior Coui 



(Petition in equity to enforce statutory lien for materials and labor furnished one of the sub -contractor s on! 
the high school extension.) Disposed of by final decree in December 1956, apportioning amounts due Rich 
Brothers Construction Co. Inc. from the Town between said company and various subcontractors. Omitte 
by error from previous report. 



Town of Wilmington v. Arthur McCormick, Jr. , Administrator of the Estate of Natalie Giroux, 



(Bill in equity to enforce statutory lien for old age assistance payments. ) Disposed of by final decree dis- 
missing bill without costs, and payment to Town of $581. 18. 



Town of Wilmington v. Estate of William E. Connolly. Middlesex Superior Court. (Equity petit 
ion to enforce statutory lien for old age assistance. ) Disposed of by final decree dismissing petition with- 
out costs, and payment to Town of $1247. 36. 



Percy G. Croiker v. Board of Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court. (Appeal from refusal of 
approval of gravel permit. ) Disposed of by final decree dismissing bill without prejudice and without cost8| 

Percy G. Crocker v. Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to restrainj 
interference with gravel removal. ) Disposed of by final decree dismissing bill without prejudice and with^ 
out costs. 

Lowell Cranberry Company v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action of tort 
to recover damages for alleged interference with drainage.) Disposed of by agreement for judgment for 
defendant without costs. 

Harry E. Wood v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for damages for 
taking of property for standpipe.) Disposed of by agreement, and payment by Town of $4000. 



28 



Town of Wilmington v. Otto George Von Rosenberg -De LaMarre , Executor of will of Gamaliel 
Washburn, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action of contract to recover for old age assistance not included in 
the statutory lien.) Disposed of by agreement for judgment for the defendant without costs. 

Town of Wilmington v. Otto George Von Rosenberg -De LaMarre , Executor of the will of Gamaliel 
Washburn. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enforce statutory lien for old age assistance pay- 
ments. ) Disposed of by interlocutory decree directing payment to Town of up to $3337. 60 from proceeds 
of sale of real estate. 

Town of Wilmington v. Anthony Signore, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin re- 
moval of loam. ) Disposed of by final decree without prejudice and without costs. 

Elizabeth Gray v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action of tort to re- 
cover for highway injury. ) Disposed of by settlement for $375. paid by Town. 

Town of Wilmington v. Thomas H. Noyes, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Bill of 
complaint to enforce obligation to support. ) Disposed of by agreement for judgment. Noyes to pay Town 
$43. 94 a month. 

D. Compensation was received by the Town Counsel in said matters and in all other matters 
during the year as follows: 

Compensation $13Z0. less discount to conform to available appropriation $1159. 36 
Disbursements 340. 64 



$1500. 00 



(The above amounts were entirely on account of services rendered and disbursements paid in the 
calendar year 1957. ) 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip B. Buzzell 
Town Counsel 



11 

i: 



board of cemetery eoniinissioners 



BURIALS IN WILDWOOD CEMETERY 



Wilmington Residents died in Wilmington 29 
Wilmington Residents died elsewhere 35 
Non-Residents 31 

95 



29 



planning board 



John Tobey, Planning Board Chairman, 
explains Capital Outlay Program to 
town's Department Heads 




The Planning Board activity for 1958 was considerable and is summarized below according to 
principal categories. 

I. General Planning 

In our "General Plan Report" of 1957 it was reported that additional elements of planning 
were needed in order to complete a comprehensive General Plan. Three of these missing 
elements were undertaken by the Planning Board this year. We engaged the services of 
the Economic Development Associates, Inc. to assist us in this endeavor. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, and Town Manager, the Planning 
Board undertook to prepare for the town a Capital Improvement Program. This report is 
to be ready at the next annual town meeting where it will be presented to the town as a guide 
for all future capital expenditures. 



Detailed programs of recreation and school plant developme it were undertaken also, 
reports will be presented to the town in 1959. 



Final 



II. 



Sub -Division Control 



New Sub -divisions 

Plan 
Pinehill Park 
Roberts Estates 



Location 
Glen Rd. & School St. 
Burlington Avenue 



Developer 
Realty Const. & Eng. Inc. 
Johnrick Realty Trust 



Zoning 
District 
SRB 
SRA 



No. of 
Bldg. 
Lots 
26 
28 



Old Sub -divisions 

Plan 
Wilton Park 
Esquire Estates 
Pinehill Park 



Location 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Salem Street 
Glen Rd. & School St. 



Completion 
100% 

50% 
90% 



Zoning 
District 
Rural 
SRA 
SRB 



30 



Plans "Believed not to require approval" 

(A statutory classification for land on existing streets divided into lots which are exempt by State 
Law from Planning Board jurisdiction) Number of Plans - 74. 

Restrictions Voted 



From time to time in order to protect the town and future homeowners, the Planning Board may 
find it necessary to vote restriction? as to sale or construction of previously approved sub- 
divisions, until either required improvements are made or a bond is posted to insure compliance 
with the regulations of the Planning Board. Such restrictions were placed on one previously 
approved sub-division during the year 1958, and two restrictions were removed. 

Forfeiture of Bonds 



Since 1954 it has been the policy of the Planning Board to require developers to post performance 
bonds to insure compliance with Planning Board Sub-division Regulations governing improvements 
to be made in sub -divisions. 

Performance bonds in one sub-division were deemed to have been forfeited in 1958, and the Town 
Counsel was requested to undertake the necessary legal action. 



Conclusion 

This year the town felt the full effect of the sub -division regulations adopted in 1956 when the 
first streets were constructed under these regulations. Wilton Park started in 1957 was com- 
pleted this year; Esquire Estates has completed a portion of its streets; Pinehill Park a sub- 
division only started this spring has completed about 90% of its streets. Wilton Park in the 
60,000 sq. ft. zone; Esquire Estates in the 22, 500 sq. ft. zone, and Pinehill Park in the 10,000 
sq. ft. zone with their fifty-foot streets, sidewalks, curbing, drainage, trees, etc. represent 
we feel the finest type of sub-division in the area. 



Zoning 

Reports and Recommendations to Town Meeting 

Town Meeting 

Date Article Proposed Change 



March 8th 
March 8th 



15 From Rural to SRA 

16 Amend Section III-4-A- 14 



Planning Bd. 
Recommend. 

Disapproved 
Disapproved 



Planning Bd. 
Re commend. 

Disapproved 
Disapproved 



Proposed amendments to the Zoning By-Law and Map must be reviewed by the Planning Board, 
after a public hearing held by the board and a formal report and recommendations submitted to 
the town meeting proper to the vote on the proposed amendment. 



Outside of the annual town meeting, 1958 was a relatively quiet year with respect to zoning 
changes. Two proposals were made at the March Town Meeting; one called for the change of a 
section of land in the North Wilmington Rural Zone to a SRA Zone; the second proposal was a 
basic change in our Zoning By-Law. This change would have allowed the manufactury of oxygen, 
hydrogen or acetylene gas in our Industrial Zones. While the Planning Board realizes that 
changes in the Zoning By-Law and Map are necessary from time to time, the board felt here that 
these proposals were not in the best interests of the town and so reported. The Planning Board 
wishes to thank the townspeople of Wilmington for their confidence and support of the recom- 
mendations of the Planning Board. 



31 



Reports of Board of Appeals 



The Zoning By-Law requires that the Planning Board shall submit advisory reports to the Board 
of Appeals for certain appeal cases. In addition thereto, the board is usually represented at 
public hearings of the Board of Appeals and consults informally with the Board of Appeals on 
questions of interpretation of the Zoning By-Law and Map. 

Of the two formal reports submitted to the Board of Appeals both recommended disapproval. In 
one of these cases, the Board of Appeals concurred with the recommendation of the Planning 
Board; and the other appeal is still pending. 

Street Names 

Work was started in 1956 to review the IZOO street names in the Town of Wilmington, and to re- 
name those streets with conflicting names. Over these past three years considerable work has 
been done by the board, and as the year closes we are ready to begin public hearings where 2 50 
street names will be changed. We feel confident by the time this report is published that this 
project will be completed, and an ill that has plagued the town for years will be corrected. 

Parks and Recreation 

The Planning Board, which also serves as the Board of Park Commissioners, has attempted to 
make Silver Lake Beach a place of recreation for all townspeople. This year the beach was 
extended 150 ft. , or about double in size. This was necessary due to the increased use of the 
beach by the townspeople. 

The board sponsored an article at the Annual Town Meeting to commence the improvement of 
the Town Common. This year the basic cement sidewalks were built. Next year we expect to 
seed and grass the entire Town Common, thus completing the second phase of this program. 

As mentioned earlier, we are conducting a study of the various recreation needs of the town and 
will have a report for the town some time in 1959. 

General 

The Planning Board wishes to acknowledge the full cooperation received from the people of the 
town, all other boards and officials, and hopes for their continued cooperation during the coming 
year. 




32 




police department 




Police Department Cruisers 



ARRESTS 



Drunkenness 


60 


Adultery 


1 


Assault and Battery 


7 


Illegitimacy 


2 


Indecent Assault 


4 


Juvenile Arrest 


14 


Arrest Made for Other Depts. 


29 


Operating Under the Influence 


11 


A. W. O. L. (Military) 


1 


Operating Without a License 


3 


Non Support 


5 


Operating Unregistered Vehicle 


2 


Attempted Rape 


1 


Operating Uninsured Vehicle 


2 


Lewdne s s 


2 


Excessive Speed 


15 


Profane Language 


1 


Leaving Scene of Accident 


2 


Arson 


2 


Loaning License 


1 


Armed Robbery 


2 


Operating After Suspension of License 


9 


Purchasing Liquor for Minor 


1 


Operating Without Authority 


7 


Carrying Concealed Weapon 


1 


Operating So As To Endanger 


4 


Ince st 


1 


Failing to Stop at Stop Sign 


2 


False Alarm of Fire 


1 


Failing to Slow Down at Intersection 


1 



II Fines assessed for Motor Vehicle Violations 
llFines assessed for Criminal Violations 



194 

$1, 185. 00 
235. 00 
$1, 420. 00 



Auto Accidents: The records show that we had 142 accidents involving property damage only. 
49 involving personal injuries 11 involving pedestrians 4 fatals. 

Automobiles Stolen: We had nine (9) automobiles stolen during the year from within the 

itown. 



ii 



Automobiles Recovered: We recovered thirty (30) cars stolen elsewhere and left here. 



Bicycles Stolen: We had twenty-one (21) bikes stolen from within the town 

of them. 

33 



recovered eleven 




Emergency Cruiser Trips: The department transported eleven (11) persons to hospitals, and 
nine (9) others to local doctors for medical attention. 

Summonses Delivered: The department served 291 summonses for other departments during the 
year. We receive these summonses from other departments and have to serve them by delivering them to 
the person named then make our return and re -mail the summons back to the department sending it. 

These summonses are for all types of motor vehicle violations and also for other minor crimes 
committed by Wilmington residents outside the town limits. 

Sudden Deaths: We investigated seventeen sudden death cases during the year. These are cases 
where the department had to summon the Medical Examiner, Other sudden deaths occurred in town but did 
not require the attention of the Medical Examiner. 

Buildings Found Open: Night officers checking business establishments found sixty-seven (67) 
places left open. 

Miscellaneous Items 



Cases of Vandalism Reported 

Death Messages Delivered 

Missing Persons Reported 

Houses Broken Into (Larceny Involved) 

Larcenies Reported 

False Alarms of Fire Answered 

Houses Searched (Warrant Issued)(Boston Police) 
Automobiles Repossessed 
Accidental Shooting 
Attempted Suicide 

Assistance Rendered Other Departments 
Sunday Work Permits Issued 
Automobiles Transferred (Private) 



67 
5 
11 
71 
38 
6 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 
98 
301 



Registry of Motor Vehicle Activities: Four "Operation Roadwatch" programs were carried out 
this year. This is the program inaugurated by Registrar Riley whereby, without any advance notice, 
Registry Personnel are sent into each city and town from 1. 00 A. M. to 3, 00 A. M. where they join forces 
with local enforcement officers and go out on the road and check all vehicles (every last one). 

It is the most terrific piece of enforcement work carried out by registry and police. It keeps thei 
motoring public on guard constantly. . . .for they never know when it is going into operation. (It is so 
secretly conducted that I missed it twice -- that is I didn't know it was in operation until the next morning) 

Licenses suspended by the Registry for all violations total 168. This includes violations committ 
both in-town and out-of-town by Wilmington operators. Included in this number are certain violators that 
we elected to take Registry action rather than court action. (Registry action though very effective does 
not give a person a criminal record and we take such action only to keep some youngster's record clea 

Records show that 104 persons had their licenses reinstated during fhe past year and that 64 

persons are still without their license. These sixty-four are the ones who committed serious violations 
and have lost their license either for a year or for an indefinite period of time. 

Women Traffic Supervisors: This division of the department is now at maximum strength with 

nine members. During the "two platoon" sessions of school, these officers had their hands full and 

they did a terrific job of it. To some it was necessary to come out three and four times a day, but now we 
are getting back to normal. To all of the "girl cops" my most sincere thanks and appreciation for a job 
well done. 

34 



Deputy Chief Francis S. Hoban: 

It is with deep and profound sympathy that we record the death of Wilmington's Beloved Deputy 
Chief of Police Francis S. Hoban, who passed on to his eternal reward December 18, 1958. 

May God love him and keep him in His care! 

Conclusion: 

My most sincere thanks go to Arthur Boudreau, Fire Chief, and the members of his department 
for their wonderful spirit of cooperation during the year. 

To the town departments that worked so willingly towards helping us with our many problems. 
(We call on just about every one to help us AND WE GET THE HELP OF THEM ALL. ) 

To the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen, I extend thanks and appreciation for the 
interest shown in the department's problems during the year. 




l' 



Police Chief Paul Lynch looks on as 
Town Clerk Esther Russell administers 
oath of office to AVCO special police force. 



35 




fire department 




75 foot Aerial Ladder Truck similar 
to type ordered by Town of Wilmington 

The following is my report of the Fire Department for the year 1958. The manual force of the 
Fire Department consists of Chief, three Lieutenants, and eight Privates. There is a Call Force of eighteen 
member s. 



Permanent Men 

Cail, Harold F. (Lieut.) 
Cushing, George S. (Lieut.) 
Woods, Robert J. (Lieut. ) 



(resigned) 



Call Men 

Baldwin, William E. 
Buckle, Thomas G. 
Burns, Erlmest F. 
Cutter, Harry J. 
Deming, Roland C. (deceased) 
Downs, Francis E. 
Durkee, Leslie A. 
Kidder, Donald C. 
Mann, William J, 
Medico, Joseph 
Moorman, Howard C. 
O'Neil, Maurice D. 
Park, Phillip S. 
Randell, Vernon L. 
Razey, Donald F. 
Robertson, Bernerd, Jr. 
Sargent, Edmund H. 
Williams, Arthur S. 
Yentile, Rocco 

The Fire Department responded to a total of six hundred and seven (607) calls, eighty-one (81) 
bell alarms, and five hundred and twenty-six (526) still alarms. 



Forest Warden: 

Arthur J. Boudreau 

Deputy Forest Warden: 

Barrows, Herbert C. 
Cail, Harold F. 
Cushing, George S. 
Fames, Ernest W. 
Plumer, Ralph M. Jr. 
Sargent, Edmund H. 
Williams, Arthur S. 
Woods, Robert J. 



Blaisdell, Augustus V. 
Dewhurst, Raymond T. 
Ellis, Charles E. Jr. 
Kleynen, Frederick M. 
Marshall, Kenneth E. 
Nee, William P. 
Plumer, Ralph M. Jr. 
Wandell, Daniel C. 
Webster, Charles L. 



1 



36 



Ambulance Calls 299 

Auto & Truck Calls 16 

Brush & Grass 116 

Buildings 42 

Chimneys 6 

Dumps 2 

Permits Issued for Burning 2275 

Permits Issued for Gas 60 



False Alarms 17 

Oil Burner s 1 1 

Out of Town 9 

Resuscitator 7 

Service Calls 82 

Total 607 

Permits Issued for Oil 106 

Permits Issued for Blasting 22 



A total of 49, 135 ft. of fire hose was laid 
11,450 ft. of 1 1/2" hose, and 13,000 ft. of 2 1/2" hose. Ladders were raised 345 ft 
property endangered was $2, 017, 750. The property loss was $52, 585. 55. 



21, 385 ft. of booster hose, 3, 300 ft. of 1 1/8" hose, 

Total value of 



All the equipment is in good condition with the exception of Engine #5, a 1938 Chevrolet which is 
stationed at the North Wilmington Pumping Station. The replacement of this engine should be given serious 
consideration. 



The Junior Fire Marshall Plan was held throughout the past year in all the sixth grades, under 
the direction of the Fire Chief, Lieut. George Gushing, and Lawrence Gushing, Physical Director of the 
Wilmington Schools. 

Lieut. George S. Gushing attended the Massachusetts Civil Defense Rescue School and received 
an Instructor Diploma. This past fall the members of the permanent and call department attended a school 
on rescue work under the direction of Lieut. Gushing. 

Lieut. Harold F. Gail has been assigned as Instructor of the Civil Defense Fire Department, and 
their apparatus is stationed at J. W. Greer. 

Following is a report on the Fire Alarm System for 1958 - members of the department installed 
alarm wires from Church and Main Streets down Main Street to Lowell and West Streets. In the 1959 budget 
I am asking for $1500 to add street boxes and to extend the system to the Reading Line. 



i 



The Price of Progress - 
Gowing House being destroyed 
to make way for new highway 




37 




civil defense 




Rescue Truck: newest addition 
to Civil Defense equipment 

Fire Auxiliary: The Auxiliary stationed at the J. W. Greer plant is making excellent progress 
under the direction of Lt. Harold F, Cail of the Wilmington Fire Department. The Auxiliary has been 
called on six times in the past year to assist our regular Fire Department. Again we are grateful to the 
J. W, Greer Co, for allowing us the continued use of their facilities. 

Rescue: This service has been one of the most progressive of all units this year. In July, 
Lt, George Gushing, of the Wilmington Fire Department, completed the Instructor's Course held at the 
Civil Defense Training Center in Topsfield, Massachusetts. The rescue truck was received in September, 
and training in light rescue was started immediately with fourteen men completing the course. The rescue 
truck has made 18 emergency runs and has proved a valuable asset to the town. The 10 K. W. mobile 
generator has been used six times and has exceeded all expectations for its operation in delivering light 
and power for emergency use. 

Search & Rescue Service: Search & Rescue Service better known as "Frogmen" - they are well 
trained and now have a diver's communication set which with minor changes will enable a diver to keep in 
contact with the surface crew and other divers. 



Ambulance: The auxiliary ambulance is now equipped with a resuscitator , first aid kits, foam 
rubber mattress and blankets. The auxiliary ambulance has made nineteen trips since September, two of 
them as far as Worcester, Massachusetts. This has relieved the regular ambulance so that the town has 
service at all times. 

Radiological Service: The key personnel of the radiac team are men of outstanding ability. 
Dr, William K. Widger, Atmospheric Physicist, associated with the Cambridge Research Center. 
Dr. Dudley Buck, Professor of Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mr. Henry Sullivan 
formerly with the Oak Knoll Atomic Plant and the Lynn General Flectric Company. 

Communications: This service still maintains its high standard of efficiency in conducting 
regular drills with town, sector and state networks. The tie-in with fire and police networks has not been 
accomplished due to changes contemplated by the Federal Communication Commission. To purchase equip- 
ment tuned to the present frequency would only mean additional expense in a short time for converters. 



38 



Warden Service: Re -organization of this very important service has been slow and at times dis- 
couraging. It is interesting to note that where large numbers of our citizens are necessary to a successful 
prograjn, the response is so poor as to be almost non-existent. However, to those dedicated people who 
have taken on the job with tremendous odds against them, I wish to extend my sincere thanks. 

Police Auxiliary: We are now in the process of organizing the auxiliary police, and I have great 
expectations for this unit. Ten men have been recruited; and once the program is under way, many more 
will be eager to join. 

Reception & Dispersal Area: Camp Forty Acres has been set up as a reception and dispersal 
point in our survival plan. It is equipped with four field ranges, complete with utensils to be utilized for 
mass feeding. Also fifty metal cots and mattresses, and in times of emergency we can acquire 250 more 
cots and mattresses from the sector headquarters now located at the North Reading Sanitorium on Route 62. 
Mr. Foster Balser is in charge of this project and is to be congratulated for an excellent job. 

Emergency Water Service: A 28 K. W. gas generator has been installed at the Pumping Station, 
North Wilmington, under the direction of Mr. Edmund Sargent, Superintendent of the Water Department. 
This unit will supply light and power to run all equipment at the station. It is hoped that we can add to the 
Emergency Water Service, several large capacity electrically-driven pumps through the Civil Defense 
Surplus Property Program. 




Civil Defense Unit practices 
rescue operation 

39 



I 



Permanent Building Committee 



Following the special Town Meeting of November 25, 1957, at which the voters did not see fit to 
appropriate additional sums for the construction of a 15-room elementary school estimated to cost approxi- 
mately $800,000 off Glen Road, it became apparent that a new approach to the school building program was 
essential. A combined meeting of the Board of Selectmen, School Committee, Finance Committee, and the 
Elementary School Building Committee was held on January 8, 1958, at which time a report on the school 
building program prepared by the Town Manager, Mr. J. Courtney, was presented. ;| 

A joint sub -committee composed of Mr. N. DeFelice as chairman, representing the selectmen, 

Mr. Ed vard Page, representing the school committe, Mr. Stanley Webber, representing the finance com- 
mittee, Mr. William Irwin, representing the planning board, Mr. Erwin Hanke, representing the elementary 

school building committee, Mr. J. Courtney, Town Manager, and Mr. John Collins, Superintendent of School 
was designated to study the school building situation and to submit recommendations as to the proper course J 

of action. All members of the joint sub -committee signed a report which contained as one of the recommencM 

ations a proposal that a Permanent Building Committee be established. 

Article 41 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 8, 1958, called for the establishment of a perman^ 
ent building committee composed of five voting members. Two of the members were to be appointed for 3- 
year terms, »wo members for 2-year terms, and one member for a 1-year term. Eventually all terms will 
be for three years, but no more than two members' terms will expire in any one year. This provides con- 
tinuity of experienced membership which will benefit the town and its building program. The permanent 
building committee also has the advantage of having advisory members, one from the selectmen, finance 
committee, planning board, town manager and when school construction is involved, one from the school corr 
mittee, together with the superintendent of schools. This insures a coordinated approach to all of the work 
of the permanent building committee. 

Article 42 of the 1958 Annual Town Meeting transferred the functions of the Elementary School 
Building Committee and the Additional School Accommodations Committee to the Permanent Building Com- 
mittee. Article 43 limited the size of the proposed school off Glen Road to 12 rooms at a cost not to exceed 
$400, 000. This was in accordance with the recommendations of the joint sub-committee. The town also 
instructed the Permanent Building Committee to acquire a site, construct and originally equip a police static* 
at a cost not to exceed $65, 000. 00. The site where the station was to be constructed was stated in the 
article. 

In accordance with the vote, the selectmen appointed Mr. Raymond McClure and Mr . Vincent Mc Lai 
as 3-year members; Mr. Erwin Hanke and Mr. Paul Niles as 2-year members, and Mr. Joseph Courtney asi' 
the one-year member. The committee elected Mr. Hanke as chairman and Mr. Niles as secretary. ' 

The committee had three principal tasks. First was to build a 12-room elementary school off 
Glen Road; second to build a police station; and third consider the future building needs of the town's school 
system. Because of the desperate need of the town for additional classrooms and the delays which had alread* 
occurred in connection with the elementary school off Glen Road, the committee agreed that the school build- •. 
ing schold be given priority. I 

I 

The committee, therefore, devoted many hours interviewing architects during April, May and Juni 
More than twenty-five architects were considered, and some architects were interviewed on several occasioi 
Ultimately the committee selected the firm of Valtz and Kimberly, Inc. because of its excellent record in / 
designing high quality buildings within the budgets given to it. This was considered to be in accordance with ( 
the town's obligation to provide new classroom facilities of reasonable quality and minimum cost to suit the | 
educational program of the town. Every effort consistent with the financial ability of the town must be made r 
to discharge this most important obligation. 



40 



The architect was instructed to design a 12-room school which could be built and equipped for less 
than $400, 000 and which was flexible enough to be used at other locations throughout the town either as a 12- 
room school or less than 12-room school. Provision also had to be made for expanding it to more than 12 
rooms. The committee also instructed the architect that the obviously required economies should be made 
by cutting down on the spaces in the building which could not be used for educational purposes, rather than 
by using cheap building materials. 

The committee believes that the school now under construction off Glen Road will demonstrate that 
this has been accomplished and that good quality schools can be built at prices which we, as taxpayers, can 
afford. The school is of masonry construction, faced with structural glazed tile up to 5 1/2 ft. on all interior 
surfaces of the building. The school has hot air heat, asphalt tile floors and first quality materials are re- 
quired to be used throughout. The school is comparable in materials and finish to the Wildwood School. At 
the present time, the cost of the school appears to be as follows: 

Construction contract cost $294, 303 

AE - fees 25, 000 

5% of construction contract contingency fund 14, 715 

Equipment 16,000 
Site development including an area for the Recreation Dept. 36, 000 

$386, 018 



It will be noted that this results in a cost of less than $1100 per pupil, which is substantially lower 
than the state average. The need for additional school buildings demands that all reasonable economies be 
practiced if we are to provide the school facilities which the school department will need to accomplish its 
Jprogram successfully. 

Due to financial difficulties resulting from the obligation of the permanent building committee to 
iassume the functions and responsibilities of the elementary school building committee, it was necessary to 
hold a special town meeting on September 15, 1958, and to amend the $400, 000 limitation on cost for the 
[elementary school. Our committee has had to pay almost $50,000 for architects' fees and other expenses 
incurred by the prior committee. The major part of the sum was for architectural services which had been 
'performed in good faith and for which the town was obligated to pay. Regrettably, the services could not be 
used by this committee since the building plans which had been prepared could not be altered to lower the 
cost of the school from approximately $800, 000 to the point where it could be built for less than the $400, 000 
which had been authorized. 



The second task which our committee faced was the construction of a sorely needed police station. 
The site had been designated by the town, and while it is centrally located and the soil is suitable for the 
station, certain factors had to be considered. The site is adjacent to a drainage brook and with the advent 
iDf commercial development or urban renewal in the Rotary Park area this drainage will be increased. The 
site also included so-called paper streets and as a result certain legal problems must be resolved before it 
would be prudent to erect a building on the land. The further thought of the committee was that the police 
station could be the first building of an integrated civic center on a site so planned that it could eventually 
n elude a town hall, library and health building of unified design and architecture. With these thoughts in 
nind, the permanent building committee met with the selectmen and Articles 26 and 27 of the warrant for 
;his Annual Town Meeting are the results of those meetings. 

The $65, 000 expenditure authorized for the police station unfortunately vvill not provide adequate 
olice needs since certain essential features could not be included in the station if this sum is all that can be 
appropriated. Facilities for juveniles and women will have to be eliminated, and the administrative areas 
|will be inadequate. Chief Lynch assures the committee that the floor plan of the proposed station which will 
:ost $75,000 includes sufficient space to give the town adequate police facilities for the next twenty years. 
We, therefore, recommend the amendment to increase the sum already appropriated. The change in location 
s also recommended since the new location is also centrally located and is of course already owned by the 
town. 



The third assignment of this committee relates to additional school buildings. The school depai 
ment has informed us that another 12-room elementary school will be needed by September I960 in the We 
Wilmington area. The school department, planning board and this committee are currently conducting a 
site investigation for the location of this school. It is this committee's intention to use the plans already 
developed for the site off Glen Road at this next school and thus effect a saving of approximately 75% of th< 
architect's fees. It is anticipated that when the site is selected, a special town meeting will be called thi: 
spring for the purpose of authorizing the construction of this much needed school. 

The system of having advisory members on this or other town committees is extremely desirab 
The splendid cooperation and coordination that develops from the personal contacts and flow of informatiot 
have made our tasks much easier. We wish to thank our advisory members - Mr. N. DeFelice of the 
selectmen, Mr. S. Webber and Mr. J. Hayward of the finance committee, Mr. A. Lynch and Mr. E. Page 
of the school committee, Mr. W. Irwin of the planning board, Mr. J. Collins, superintendent of schools, 
Chief of Police Lynch, and the Town Manager for the pleasant and helpful association we have experienced 
this past year. We know that these relationships will continue and that with this aid our committee will be 
able to discharge properly whatever directions are given to us by the town. 




The New Glen Road School 
now under construction 



42 



municipal snapshots 




43 




building inspector 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Minot Anderson 




Unfortunately I cannot report a growth in the dollar value of building permits issued this year, ^' 
such a plant as AVCO's may not be duplicated for a long time. The number of dwellings (139) has remaine I 
nearly constant owing largely to the Pine Hills and Esquire Developments. 



Of really greater 


value 


to the town as a whole 


are the next f 


igures on r 


esidential additions and 


alterations which mean an up-grading of the existing 


i; residences, reflecting peopl 


e's pride in their homes 


and town with no added load 


on the 


schools or other 


town 


services. 












1956 




1957 




1958 








Bldg. Insp. 




Bldg. Insp. 




Owner' s 


Bldg. Ins ' 


Permits (Use) 


No. 


Est. Value 


No. 


Est. Value 


No. 


. Est. Value 


Est. Valu 


Dwellings 


148 


1, 920, 000 


134 


2, 135, 175 


139 


1, 730, 500 


1, 846, 80 


Additions 


57 


56, 482 


55 


65, 720 


33 


41,475 


61,07 


Alterations 


5 


4,975 






23 


33, 025 


45,7(1 


Garages & Carports 


20 


1, 600 


32 


32, 875 


24 


16, 300 


20,59 


Warehouse & Addition 


2 


30, 000 






1 


600 


l,5Cl 


Commercial, new 


8 


174, 850 


10 


171, 450 


4 


194, 250 


270, 7C 1 


Commercial. Add. &Alt. 










6 


6, 800 


10, 6C 1 


Tool Sheds 


8 


850 






4 


1, 195 


1.9? 


Contractor's Sheds 










2 


1, 250 


1,5C 


Stables & Barns 


1 


800 






5 


3, 195 


3.9^. 


Henhouses 


1 


5, 400 






1 


4, 000 


s.ocl 


Signs 


3 


1, 000 






1 


4, 440 




Church 






1 


142, 000 








Industrial Lab. 






4 


8, 990, 615 


2 


410, 000 


500, DC 


School 










1 


379, 000 


379, OC 1 


Public Housing 










2 


281, 400 


281, 4C 


Bldgs. Relocated 










13 


47, 700 


58, OC 


Manufacturing 










3 


43, 000 


50, 8C 1 


Eire Damage 










3 


1, 300 




Demolished 






7 




11 






Renewals 










27 






Foundations 










2 






Revoked 










1 






TOTAL 


258 


2, 195, 957 


243 


11, 537, 935 


308 


3, 199. 430 


3. 551.22^1 



*(Total includes construction of tax exempt properties, and construction not started or completed for "59 



44 



Permits Issued 



No. 



Fee s 



Insp. Recvd. 



Building 

Permits not issued 

Plumbing 

Wiring 



308 

167 
420 
895 



1,403. 00 
19. 00 
1. 304. 00 
2, 276. 75 
5, 002. 75 



1, 028. 00 

1, 328. 50 

2, 356. 50 



I want to call your attention to the fact that about sixty percent of the building inspector's work 
concerns the Zoning By-Law, information, interpretation and enforcement. 



sealer of weights & measures 



Samuel P. Pike was the Sealer of Weights and Measures on January 1, 1958, and Daniel P. Pike 
A^as appointed the new Sealer of Weights and Measures on September 1, 1958. The following is a result of 
;heir combined inspections: 



Scales: 



No. 

Sealed 



Over 10, 000 lbs. 




3 


100 to 5000 lbs. 




12 


Under 100 lbs. 




35 


Capacity Measures: 






One gallon 




2 


Over one gallon 




1 


Automatic Measuring Devices 


- Meters: 




Gasoline Pumps 




44 


Oil & Grease Pumps 




4 


Vehicle Tank Meter (Oil) 




23 


Automatic Measuring Devices 


- Pumps: 




Kerosene 




1 


Oil 




2 


Grease 




6 


Weights: 






Avoirdupois 




10 


Troy 




5 



No. 

Adjusted 



'i; 

i? 

sl; 

1,1 
c 



All fuel oil distributors in the Town of Wilmington have had their tanks and equipment checked by 
the Sealer of Weights and Measures. All gasoline stations have had their equipment checked and approved 
Dy this office. 



It is our hope that this coming year of 1959 will find a greater check on Poultry Farmers and 
tndustrial Shippers and Manufacturers, as to liquids refined, manufactured, and shipped. 



45 



veterans' agent 



Veterans' Benefits: 

The year 1958 once again saw an increase in the amount spent for hospital and medical care, 
particularly among the World War I veterans and their dependents. 

Sixty-eight (68) applications were processed with the following breakdown as to period of servic 

World War I $6360. 00 

World War II 8604. 00 

Korean 2614.00 

There was also a hospital bill for the wife of a World War I veteran which was not received in 
time to be included in the annual appropriation. This bill will amount to $1, 830 and will be paid under 19? 
unpaid bills account. 

Once again I would like to publicly thank the Wilmington Community Fund and its officers, and 
also Mr. A. Ring the Welfare Agent who helped to care for those veterans and their families who were no 
eligible for aid under Chapter 115 of the General Laws, as amended. 





46 



board of appeals 



Following is the report of the Board of Appeals for the year 1958, which includes the date of the 
public hearing, the name of the petitioner and the disposition of each case. 

Case #1 January 16, 1958 - Norman C. Smith - request for variance in lot size - granted. 

Sase #2 January 16, 1958 - David C. Carpenter - request permission to divide large lot into two non- 
conforming lots - request denied. 

3ase #3 January 16, 1958 - Christina Lopez - request to change single residence into two-family dwelling 
reque st denied. 

iJase #4 March 20, 1958 - Perry M. Rogers - request for variance in lot frontage - granted. 

iJase #5 March 20, 1958 - Vincent Roderick - request for variance in side line distance - granted, 

flase #6 March 27, 1958 - Steven Grillo - request permission to open tea room at intersection of Clark 
and Main Streets - denied. 

Uase #7 Methodist Church - request permission to erect steeple - granted. 

]ase #8 April 24, 1958 - Realty Construction & Engineering, Inc. - request for variance on several lots 
in development off Glen Road - granted. 

Jase #9 April 24, 1958 - David C. Anderson - request permission to remove and sell loam from two lots 
on Bridge Lane - request granted subject to rules of the Board of Selectmen. 



Za.se 


#10 


pase 


#11 


Case 


#12 


i)ase 


#13 


3a se 


#14 



distance - decision pending. 

Jase #15 May 22, 1958 - Alfred T. O'Connor - request for variance in front se tback - granted - 10 ft, 

3ase #16 May 22, 1958 - Francis J. Hagerty - request permission to erect a non-conforming tool shed - 
granted. 

Jase #17 May 15, 1958 - Minot J. Anderson - request variance in building code in regard to chimney 
construction - granted. 

/ase #18 June 19, 1958 - John A. Fay - request variance in setback - granted - average setback of adjoin- 
ing property. 

^ase #19 June 19, 1958 - Robert Jordan - request for variance in side line distance - granted - 4 ft. 



01 



47 




Case #21 



Case #22 



Case #2 3 

Case #24 
Case #25 

Case #26 

Case #27 

Case #28 

Case #29 

Case #30 

Case #31 

Case #32 
Case #33 

Case #34 

Case #35 

Case #36 

Case #37 

Case #38 
Case #39 



July 10, 1958 - Stanley Cady - request permission to construct a non-conforming tool shed - 
granted. 

July 10, 1958 - James W. Field - request variance in side lot distance to construct garage - 
granted - second class construction. 

July 10, 1958 - Mrs. E. McDevitt - request permission to change barn into living quarters - 
granted. 

July 24, 1958 - Leija W. Buck - request variance in lot size because of State takings of land - 
granted, 

July 24, 1958 - John Lucci - request permission to construct a non-conforming sign - denied. 

July 24, 1958 - Peter H. Kerr - request variance to allow construction of a carport in non- 
conformance with back yard distance - granted. 

July 24, 1958 - Henry M. Park - request variance in lot size because of State taking of land - 
granted. 

August 21, 1958 - James P. Donahue - request variances in several lots of land on Harnden St 
granted - side line variances only. 

August 21, 1958 - Bayer & Mingolla Construction Co. - request permission to construct tem- 
porary shop and service buildings - granted. 

August 21, 1958 - George Vokey - request for variance in shape of two lots on Pinewood Road 
granted on shape of lots only. 

August 28, 1958 - Walpole Woodworkers, Inc. - request for variance in setback on one small 
building - granted. 

August 21, 1958 - Robert Wagstaff - request variance to allow for dividing of lot on Brentwoo> 
Avenue - granted. 

August 7, 1958 - Justin Nason - request variance to allow for erection of a duplex house- den 

August 7, 1958 - William C. Penny - request for variance in side line distance for garage - 
granted - 5 ft. variance with second class construction. 

August 7, 1958 - Isaac Fox - request for variance in side line distance to construct carport - 
granted - 7 ft. 

September 11, 1958 - Timothy J. Sullivan - request for variance in side line distance to con- 
struct garage - granted - second class construction. 

September 11, 1958 - Gennille Craik - request permission to use a non-conforming sign in 
front yard - decision pending. 

September 11, 1958 - J. Greenleaf Nason - request variance in set back - granted - average 
set back of adjoining property. 

September 18, 1958 - Mary Cronis - request variance for Nursing Home - decision pending, 
October 23, 1958 - John Sullivan - request variance on shape of lots on Salem Street - grant* 

48 



David C. Carpenter, Jr. - request variance to allow for two-family house at 313 Salem Street - 
granted. 

Oct. 16, 1958 - Gabrielle DePiano - request permission to use trailer as living quarters while 
constructing home - granted - for one year. 

Oct. 16, 1958 - James R. Anderson - request permission to sell surplus land to abuttor- granted. 

Oct. 23, 1958 - John J. Ruggerio - request permission to sell surplus gravel from lot on Andover 
Street - granted - subject to approval of Selectmen. 

Nov. 6, 1958 - W. C. Demars - request permission to sub-divide large lot on Lawrence Street 
into smaller lots - granted. 

Nov. 6, 1958 - William Dias - request permission to sell earth products from land off Concord 
Street - denied. 

Nov. 20, 1958 - Harry R. Deming - request permission to use house on Federal Street as two- 
family - granted. 



Nov. 20, 1958 - Wilmington Coal & Oil Co. - request in side line distance and set back - granted. 

Nov. 20, 1958 - Augustus T. Norton, Jr. - request variance on size of lot on High Street 
because of State land taking - granted. 



Dec. 4, 1958 - Pasquale Calendrello - request variance on lot frontage - decision pending. 

Dec. 4, 1958 - Samuel L. Clogston - request permission to erect non-conforming tool shed - 
granted. 

Dec. 4, 1958 - Philip R. Watson - request variance in set back and side line distance on lot on 
Andover Street - granted - 40 ft. set back and 25 ft. side line. 



ii 

C3 



Dec. 4, 1958 - Ethel W. Caller - request temporary use of trailer as living quarters on 
Shawsheen Avenue - granted - one year time limit. 

la.se #53 Dec. 4, 1958 - Carleton E. Jones - request variance in setback on lot of land on Auburn Avenue 
granted - 25 ft. set back on lot 91B. 



Hearing A Case 
Members of the board and interested 
citizens listen to developer outline plans 
before the Board of Appeals 




49 




town engineer 



TOWN ENGINEER 
George F. Maynard 




The problem of keeping the public works program of a progressive growing community up-to-date 
and under control occupied much of the time of the Town Engineer. 

With the assistance of the Northeastern University cooperative students the Engineer inspected an 
supervised construction of many of the town's public works projects including streets, drainage, parking 
areas, beaches and the installation of utilities in all subdivisions. 

The year 1958 saw the completion of the first phase of a sewer program, and construction under 
the street and water betterment program was at an all time high. All layouts of new town streets are one 
of the routine responsibilities of the engineering department, and many time-consuming factors must be 
considered in such construction. 

It is important that all utilities proposed and existing, show in proper location on all plans to 
eliminate the possibility of over -lapping work. The work load of the department increased substantially 
during 1958 with no concurrent increase in personnel, and the town departments are availing themselves of 
the services of the Engineer. i 

Excellent liason has been established between this office and the Department of Public Works, anc ' 
its importance will become apparent as Route 93 nears completion. Among the results of such liason are: 
the straightening of West Street at Suncrest Avenue; the relocation of the Reagan Park monument, and the 

acquisition of a complete set of detailed plans of Interstate 9 3 and Route 2 5 by the town all of inestimab'. 

value to the town. 

Similar cooperation is apparent in our contact with utility companies and county engineers on sue! 
important projects as schools and state or county supervised construction of streets. 

Construction of the following betterment streets was supervised by the Engineer: 

Dell Drive Patricia Circle 

Kiernan Avenue Shady Lane Drive 

Marcus Road Walker Street 

Meadow Lane - Wing Road 

Oakridge Circle 



50 



In addition, the laying of curbing was supervised on these streets: 



Chandler Road Kelley Road 

Dunton Road Suncrest Avenue 

Drainage staked out for construction on the following streets: 

Fames Street Oakwood Road 

Gravel Pit Inspections: 



The following pits have been completed in Wilmington: 

Merrill - Chestnut Street Baldwin - Andover Street 

Nitchie - Che stnut Street Chipman - Andover Street 

New pits in Wilmington now in operation: - None 

Old pits in Wilmington now in operation with a permit: 




Ready To Roll 
Town Engineer drives new carryall 



51 



I - 




board of water commissioners 



Water Supply: 

During 1958 test wells were driven in two selected areas in accordance with the department's 
long range program of having a new well field and pumping station in operation by 1961. In one of the areas 
a successful ten day pumping test was run which proved to be satisfactory to the State Department of Public 
Health. Further tests and development are planned on this site for 1959. 

A heavy industrial usage of water in 1958 together with the continued growth of the number of 
private services has caused the department to take steps to immediately increase the supply of water over 
and above the plans for the new well field. To cope with the problem, several wells at the Brown's Crossin 
Station have been cleaned already, and more will be cleaned during the early months of 1959. The cleaning 
process will result in a much higher yield from the present wells. Also, plans are being made to drive mo 
wells at the Barrows Well Field and to install a million gallon per day electric driven pump at that pumping 
station. The capacity of the present diesel driven pump is 600,000 gallons per day. These immediate step 
should assure the town of an adequate supply of water until the new well field is in operation. 

Detailed pumping statistics are set forth below: 



1954 



1955 



1956 



1957 



1958 



Maximum gallons 
pumped per Day 



1,745,000 1,644,600 1,458,100 1,800,500 l,850, 60i 



Maximum gallons 
pumped per Week 



11,210,000 10,941,300 9,548,000 11,784,000 9,731,50' 



Maximum gallons 
pumped per Month 



37,986,100 43,228,500 41,020,400 44,339,000 38,549,00' 



Average gallons 
pumped per Day 



862, 870 



844, 900 



922, 470 



979,750 1,081,70 



Average gallons 
pumped per Month 



26,245,625 25,692,550 28,135,330 29,800,825 32,902,00 



Total gallons 
pumped per Year 



314,947,500 308,310,600 337,623,950 357,609,900 394,824,80 



Water Main Extensions: 



In 1958, fifteen thousand six hundred (15,600) feet of mains were added to the Wilmington distri- 
bution system bringing the total miles of mains at the end of 1958 to 56.4 M. Fleven new hydrants were 
added to the system. 

To complete the 1958 Betterment Program, a main must be laid Across the railroad bridge on 
Nichols Street, and one hundred (100) feet of main must be laid on Clifton Street in the spring of 1959. 



52 



The following table sets forth the water main extensions: 

No. Ft. No. Ft. No. Ft. 

Street: 6" Main 8" Main 10" Main 

(Installed under Provisions of Betterment Act) 

Shawsheen Avenue & Nichols Street 1, 818 1,495 1, 051 

Chestnut Street 1,217 2,400 

Clifton Street 438 
(Installed by Builders & Developers) 

Marie Drive 1,440 

Thrush Road 460 

Salem Street 380 

Carson Avenue 330 

Druary Lane 687 

School Street Extension 783 

Loumac Street 400 

Cypress Street 487 

Chase Street 314 

Service road from Woburn St. to Park St. 1, 900 

TOTALS 5, 787 6,862 2,951 

GRAND TOTAL - 15,600 ft. 

I 

Meter Program: 

With the program of installing meters in all services almost complete, a new meter repair pro- i_ 
gram was set up. A new Ford Meter Bench and testing machine were set up at the Brown's Crossing Pumping 5j 
Station. In 1958, sixty-seven meters were tested and repaired under the direction of the chief plant engineer. 0^ 

Total Total 2 3? 

New Metered Unmetered Total 3; 

C ;l 

Year Services Services Services Services Os 

1958 161 2,531 127 2,658 i 




53 



tree warden 



Tree Department Personnel: left to right, 
Supt. William Babine, William Silva, 
Joseph Cunningham, Thomas Sullivan 




Tree Department: 

Our routine work, such as removing trees and broken tree limbs, cutting away damaged tops, 
and trimming low limbs was carried on throughout the year. Forty-two trees were cut down for street 
widening, and the brush taken to the dump and burned. All shade trees were sprayed three times. The 
Tree Department erected the Christmas tree on the Common, and though the Reading Light Department has 
discontinued the practice of lighting the tree, they presented the equipment to the town, and the men of this 
department decorated the tree. We are grateful to Mr Herbert C, Barrows for his kindness in again 
giving this Christmas tree to the town. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 

Spraying was started on April 15th and all elms were sprayed five times with a 6% D. D.T. 
solution. Thirty-six barrels of this spray were used, eleven of which were provided by the State at a sav- 
ing of $800 to the town. Eighty samples of elm trees were sent to the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst for testing, and seventy-one were returned labeled "Dutch Elm Disease". To date, fifty-six of 
these trees have been cut down and destroyed. 

4 

Moth Department: 

All street shade trees were sprayed with 6% and 12% D.D.T. for gypsy moth, tent caterpillars, 
fall web worms, aphids, pine shoot moth, oak blight and maple leaf spot. All front lawns were sprayed 
with 6% D.D.T. for Japanese beetle. It is advisable to caution all homeowners to make sure their properi 
is free of items that might prove breeding places for mosquitoes, i.e. tin cans and discarded tires. 

Town Forest: 

A large amount of brush and several dead trees were removed from the Town Forest this year. 
The ball field and the area abutting the old Middlesex Canal were sprayed. 

Mosquitoe s: 

As in previous years, we sprayed all bogs, swamps and as much of private property as our 
equipment could reach. 

Poison Ivy: 

Brush killer was sprayed on stone walls, brush, private property (where requested) and the 
sides of streets. Townspeople, are advised to call the Town Hall or. the Tree Department (Oliver 8-2809) 
to report the growth of poison ivy on their land. Also, if the growth of dogwood is suspected, the Tree 
Department, upon request, will examine the growth, and if necessary spray it. 



54 



highway department 




New Highway Department Truck, 
Heavy duty vehicle serves dual purpose, 
bigger pay load, better snow plowing 



Regular routine work was carried on throughout the year; such as patching, cleaning culverts and 
catch basins, scraping and cleaning shoulders, brush cutting, and the erection of street and traffic signs. 
New fences were installed where needed. 

i 

Due to an abnormally wet year, brush control presented a serious problem. In many cases the 
brush was cut three times especially on curves and blind corners. All the surrounding towns had the same 
problem. As a last resort to combat the situation, I purchased special spraying equipment and,five barrels 
of poison. Towns using the spraying method claim it is the answer to their brush problem. The poison 
ased is guaranteed to kill the brush if properly used. To obtain the desired results the spraying should be 
done in the middle of the spring when growth and foliage are tender. Most all the streets were sprayed with 
this poison by the Tree Department, but I do not expect any startling results as the job was done late in the 
fall. The Tree Warden and I investigated and were satisfied with its killing effects and agree if used in the 
spring will produce the desired results. 

As in past years, the Highway Department joined forces with the Tree Department in the removal 
of dead, diseased and dangerous trees. A large number of elm trees have been and are still being cut down 
md burned, and if this rate continues for the next fifteen to twenty years very few will be left standing. 



I) 
"> i? 

I* ' 



All street construction carried over from 1957 was completed, and all contemplated drainage has 
been completed. 



Chapter 90 Construction for 1957 completed in 1958: 
(Available funds $24,000) (Expenditure $23,950) 



Park Street - started Dec. 15, 1957 and completed in August 1958. All trees, stumps, brush, 

ledge, subsoil and peat removed for a distance of 2750 ft. x 50 ft. wide 1200 ft. of drainage 

and eight catch basins installed entire right of way graveled a 24-ft. traveled way was 

graded, surface -treated with heavy asphalt, back-covered with pea gravel and rolled. 



55 



Chapter 90 Construction for 1958: 

(Available funds $15,000) (Expenditure $14,700) 



Lowell Street - 2200 ft. x 40 ft. wide. All subsoil, mud and peat in the shoulder abutting the 

AVCO property removed and backfilled with gravel and rolled all catch basins relocated and 

raised to grade new drain lines installed where needed surfaced with Type I hot mix 

and rolled. 

Chapter 90 Construction for 1958: 

(Available funds $9, 300) (Expenditure $4, 400) 

Park Street - 750 ft. x 50 ft. All peat and mud removed back-filled with gravel and rolled 

temporary surface -treated as some drainage has to be installed two new fences installed. . . 

three driveways repaired one lawn rebuilt to offset the damage caused by grade changes. 

Work held up on orders issued by the Dept. of Public Works until a definite point is designated as 
to where the contractor now working on the new Route 28 will stop. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance for 1958: 
(Available funds $4500) (Expenditure $4496) 

Middlesex Avenue - 4/10 of a mile sealed with RC5 asphalt stone covered and rolled. 

Church Street - 9/10 of a mile sealed with RC5 asphalt stone covered and rolled. 

Shawsheen Avenue - 1 9/10 of a mile sealed with RC5 asphalt stone covered and rolled. 

(Available funds $1500) (Expenditure $1430) 

Specified streets graveled where needed and surface -treated. 

Broad Street - 4/10 of a mile gravel added and penetrated. Cook Avenue - 3/10 of a 

mile gravel added and penetrated. Highland Street - 3/10 of a mile gravel added and 

penetrated. Border Avenue - 1/10 of a mile gravel added and penetrated. 



Streets Constructed under Betterments: 
(Available funds $60,000) Expenditure $53, 000) 



Oakridge Circle 1850 ft. 

Wing Road 750 ft. 

Kiernan Avenue 800 ft. 

Dell Drive 450 ft. 



Patricia Circle 
Walker Street 
Marcus Road 
Shady Lane Drive 



400 ft. 
450 ft. 
2350 ft. (1800 finishe 
600 ft. ( 300 finishe 
(culvert installed) 



Streets Constructed under Chapter 718 - started in 1957 and finished in 1958 
(Available funds $14,787) (Expenditure $14, 700) 



Meadow Lane 400 ft. 

Kelley Road 950 ft. 

Chandler Street 350 ft. 

Fairmeadow Road: 

(Special appropriation $18, 000) (Expenditure to date $9, 500) 

All trees, stumps, brush, boulders, subsoil and mud removed graveled and graded. . . 

1500 ft, of drainage and six catch basins to be installed in 1959 street will be finished. 

Play Area - rear of Swain School and Library: 

Trees and brush were cut fill hauled in from various jobs and spread cost $350, 



56 



Parking Area - Middle sex A venue , N. Wilmington 



(Available Funds $500) (Expenditure $5500) 



Entire area excavated in some sections the mud and peat were 4 ft to 5 ft. deep 200 cu. yds of 

boulders hauled away several were too large to load and will have to be blasted several pieces of 

ledge must be removed if the parking lot is to be finished a large area was graveled, graded and sur- 
face treated with asphalt, back-covered with stone, and rolled. All the loam was hauled to the cemetery. 

Miscellaneous expenditures: 



Silver Lake Beach (hired equipment) 600. 00 

Camp Forty Acres (Boy Scout Camp) 250. 00 

Special equip, and poison for brush control 600. 00 

Street signs, traffic signs and post 936.00 

Town pit (stripping) 420. 00 



Patching 
Drainage 
Town Dump 
Tree removal 



1, 084. 00 
3, 432. 00 
240. 00 
2, 000. 00 



Chapter 81 and Highway Expense Account - Salary & Wages 



Seal with RC5 and stone cover: 



Cost 



Cost 



Adams St. 


3/10 


mi. 


$340. 00 


Jacquith Rd. 


2/10 


mi. 


$321. 00 


Adelaide St. 


1/10 


mi. 


184. 00 


Judith Rd. 


1/10 


mi. 


230. 00 


Aldrich Rd. 


5/10 


mi. 


638. 00 


Kendall St. 


4/10 


mi. 


505, 00 


Birchwood Rd. 


3/10 


mi. 


603. 00 


Lake Street 


2/10 


mi. 


195. 00 


Boutwell St. 


3/10 


mi. 


320. 00 


Middlesex Ave. 


3/10 


mi. 


824. 00 


Br idge Lane 


2/10 


mi. 




Nickerson Ave. 


2/10 


mi. 


122, 00 


corner at Main St. cut 


& graveled 


772. 00 


Oak Street 


1/10 


mi. 


85. 00 


Brand Ave . 


4/10 


mi. 


414. 00 


Oakdale Road 


4/10 


mi. 


773. 00 


Burt Road 


4/10 


mi. 


355. 00 


Parker St. 


4/10 


mi. 


509. 00 


Butters Row 


4/10 


mi. 


330. 00 


Philips Ave. 


3/10 


mi. 


315. 00 


Cedar St. 


800 


ft. 


105. 00 


Pineview Rd. 


1/10 


mi. 


114. 00 


Central Ave. 


2/10 


mi. 


150. 00 


Pinewood Rd, 


4/10 


mi. 


565. 00 


Central St. 


1/10 


mi. 


154. 00 


Roman Way 


3/10 


mi. 




Chestnut St. 


4/10 


mi. 




also - dangerous 


corner eliminated 


1087 , 00 


also - 2 fences 






1084. 00 


Roosevelt Rd. 


3/10 


mi. 


272. 00 


Clark St. 


4/10 


mi. 


349. 00 


Shady Lane Drive 


5/10 


mi. 


573, 00 


Cunningham St. 


3/10 


mi. 


285. 00 


Sprucewood Rd. 


1/10 


mi. 


249, 00 


Dorche ste r St. 


4/10 


mi. 


492. 00 


Strout Avenue 


3/10 


mi. 


396. 00 


Essex St. 


3/10 


mi. 


344. 00 


Swain Road 


4/10 


mi. 


398. 00 


Faulkner Rd. 


4/10 


mi. 


480. 00 


Suncrest Ave. 


3/10 


mi. 


596. 00 


Federal St. 


6/10 


mi. 


759. 00 


Taplin Ave. 


3/10 


mi. 


353. 00 


Glen Road 


4/10 


mi. 


323. 00 


Union Street 


3/10 


mi. 


368. 00 


riarden St. 


1/10 


mi. 


255. 00 


Westdale Ave. 


2/10 


mi. 


142. 00 


Harris St. 


2/10 


mi. 


220. 00 


Wild Avenue 


3/10 


mi. 


383.00 


Hopkins St. 


4/10 


mi. 


321. 00 


Wildwood Street 


1 3/10 


mi. 


1768. 00 


Construction and Surface 


Treated: 














j^ndover St. 


5/10 


mi. 




North St. 


5/10 


mi. 


1570. 00 


also - one catch basin 






3600. 00 


Williams Ave. 


1/10 


mi. 


939. 00 


Brentwood Ave. 


3/10 


mi. 


1052. 00 


Woburn Street 


1 2/10 


mi. 


3289. 00 


liJones Ave. 


1/10 


mi. 


663. 00 











:t9 

Si 

'd 1 
c 



Carter Lane : - 2800 ft a major construction job, trees, stumps, boulders, subsoil and brush removed. 

graveled and graded not finished poles had to be moved in order to get a 24-ft. traveled way 

$5,800. 



57 



1 

I 



Laurel Ave. 


1/10 mi mix in place with asphalt and pea gravel and roll 




$ 520.01 


Linda Road 


200 ft excavate subsoil, remove ledge and gravel 3/10 mi. 








seal with RC5 and stone cover 




1, 903. 01 


Lockwood Rd. 


3/10 mi seal with MC3 and sand cover 




248. Qi 


West Street 


9/10 mi part seal, part mix and culvert 




1, 426. Oi 


The following expenditures include items such as new fences, repaired fences, 


curbing, patching 


brush cutting and burning, drainage, shoulder widening, street signs, etc. 






Miscellaneous expenditures: 






Ballardvale Street $426. 00 Lawrence Court 




36. 0( 


Border Avenue 


280.00 Lawrence Street 




46. 01 


Broad Street 


270.00 Liberty Street 




110. 0( 


Burlington Ave. 


72.00 Lincoln Street 




324. 0( 


Concord Street 


42. 00 McDonald Road 




335. 0( 


Cook Avenue 


425. 00 Middlesex Avenue 




96. 01 


Dunton Road 


672.00 Morse Avenue 




85. 0( 


Fames Street 


827. 00 Moth Building 




15. Oi 


Fay Street 


352. 00 Nassau Avenue 




34. 0( 


Forrest St. 


75. 00 Nichols Street 




477. 0( 


Garden Court 


110.00 Oakwood Road 




255, 0( 


Grant Street 


80.00 Pershing Street 




30. 0( 


Grove Avenue 


40. 00 Salem Street 




100. 0( 


Hathaway Road 


20. 00 Shawsheen Ave. 




262. 0( 


High Street 


40.00 Suncrest Ave. 




132. 0( 


Highland Street 


235. 00 Wilson Street 




55. 0( 


Due to 


the severe cold in the month of December, three jobs had to be closed because 


of frost, 


and they will be finished in 1959. 






All the 


highway equipment is in good condition. One truck was purchased in 1947 and should be 


replaced at a cost of about $6500. Much of the equipment has to remain outdoors as the 


garage 


is definite! 


too small. It was constructed in 1947 when the town owned two trucks, roller, Ford coupe and a 


Cletrac 


tractor. A suitable building should be constructed in 1959 to house all town owned equipment with quarters 


for the men and an office for the superintendent. At present the roller is stored in Woburn under poor 


aonditions. The 


garage itself should be at least 150 ft. x 50 ft. I realize that we need new schools, but b> 


the Scune token a 


new highway garage is a must it cannot be put off any longer. 






At this 


time I wish to take the opportunity to thank the various department heads for their co- 


operation and publicly state that it has been a pleasure to work with the past and present Town Manager and 



the Board of Selectmen. 



Highway Department Crew 
reconstructs Park Street 




58 





board of health 



HEALTH AGENT & SANITARIAN 
Patrick A. Thibeau 



In the year 1958, community health programs relating to communicable disease control, public 
•health nursing, environmental sanitation and laboratory were continued and in some stressed. The importance 
of a laboratory, as an example was clearly demonstrated this year when a total of 1,651 tests were performed 
|is compared to 785 in 1957 for a net gain of 210% over that year. With the intensified mass polio innoculation 
having been completed in 1957, a sustaining program for children between six months and one year was in- 
stituted this year. The number of reported cases of communicable diseases remained about the same as in 
the previous years; with the exception of two diagnosed cases of whooping cough. From what could be deter- 
mined, neither child had received its immunization doses. 

The year 1958 saw the completion of the first Wilmington health code started five years previously. 
The code has been modernized to meet changing conditions but has certain protective features to prevent 
Dossible hardships. The Board of Health is indebted to all those who collaborated with its promulgation and 
especially to those previous Board of Health members who were instrumental in its enactment. Copies of 
he code book may be obtained from the Town Clerk. 



Vlr. A. 



An organizational change within the Board of Health was made this year with the election of 
C. Walker as Chairman. 



A resume of the activities carried on this year is as follows: 
A. Communicable Disease Control 

I. Immunization Clinics 



5 ' 



Four clinics were held this year for pre -school children. Innoculation s were against diphtheria, 
tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough). A booster clinic was also held for any pre -school child 
up to the age of six who had been previously innumized. 



Children innoculated at clinics 50 
Children who completed series of three doses 33 
Children who received booster doses 27 



59 



II, Polio Innoculation Clinics 

The mass polio innoculation program having been completed in the previous two years when 
9600 doses were given and 53 clinics held, and acting in compliance with state requirements, 
clinics were held only for those children under one year of age who had not received any previous 
innoculations . 



Total Number of Innoculations given 

Total Number of Clinics held 

Number of Physicians Supplied with Vaccine 



330 
4 
2 



Age Distribution of Innoculations and their Number - Public Clinic 



1st 



Under 5 
5 through 9 



74 




2nd 



87 




3rd 



169 
3 



III. 



Anti-Rabies Clinic 



As in the four previous years, an anti-rabies clinic was held in May. Gardiner Lester, D. V. M. 
was the attending veterinarian. A total of 399 dogs received their anti-rabies innoculations. 



B. 



Public Health Nursing 



Nursing visits for year 1958 
Fees collected for visits 



743 
$441 



.1 



This phase of the public health nurse's program includes all services connected with the care of 
the sick. It's purpose is to offer skilled nursing care, under the direction and guidance of a 
physician, to those persons requiring such service in the home; to give instructions in the care of 
the sick, in the prevention of disease and in the promotion of health. This service is available to 
any individual living in the Town of Wilmington. 

Health Services: A total of 184 visits were made in the interest of child and adult health. These 
visits include prenatal, postnatal, premature, infant, child and adult health. The purpose of this 
service is to help families formulate plans for the promotion and protection of their own health 
and well being and to acquaint them with facilities and resources whereby they might carry out 
these plans. 

f 

Late in the fall a survey was started to determine what health services would best serve the needs 
of the community. At the present time, the Board of Health does not have adequate space to carrj 
out its aims, but it is hoped when adequate housing has been provided that the results of this surve 
will help to determine just what health service will best serve the needs of the community. 

Child Care Agencies and Nur sing Homes: The licensing and supervision of agencies giving day 
care to children under seven years of age is the responsibility of the local Board of Health. The 
local Board must approve the application of a Nursing Home before a license is granted by the 
State Department of Public Health. Ten inspections were made in regard to these agencies. 



60 



Tuberculosis Report of 1958 



Total Number Active Cases in Register 18 

Total Number Cases Hospitalized 2 

New Cases Reported 1 

Number of Diagnosed Tuberculosis cases visited 21 

Total Number of Visits made to diagnosed cases 82 

Total Number of Visits (suspects, cases, contacts) 188 

Number of Visits made to North Reading State Sanatorium 17 

Number of Visits made to Essex County Sanatorium 8 



Environmental Sanitation 



The Board of Health carried on various functions in at least seven branches of sanitation, namely 
water, milk, sewage, refuse disposal, housing and recreational area sanitaticn. 

Water Sanitation 



Number of wells inspected 30 
Found satisfactory 19 
Found contaminated 11 

Owners of the wells that were contaminated or poorly constructed were advised in the methods 
necessary to render the water safe for drinking and culinary purposes. A number were able to 
be thus corrected. Homes serviced by wells should have the supply inspected and analyzed once 
a year as a safety precaution. The Board of Health will perform this service without charge or 
obligation to the owner of any property located in the Town, 

Milk Sanitation 



Licensed Da.iries 21 
Pasteurization Plants Inspected 17 
Samples of Milk and Cream Analyzed 307 

The quality of milk sold in Wilmington has increased to such a point that 99.4% of the total 
laboratory tests ran showed compliance with local and state requirements. This in a great part 
is due to the dairymen themselves, but also reflects the fact that vigilance and regulatory pro- 
cedures affords maximum protection to the public. The range distribution of 307 samples of 
milk and cream analyzed gave the following: 



Milk and Flavored Milk Drinks* 






500 


colonic s 


6 


Sample s 


501 


- 1,000 


colonie s 


68 


Sample s 


1, 001 


- 5,000 


colonic s 


109 


Sample s 


5, 001 


- 10, 000 


colonie s 


13 


Sample s 


10, 001 


- 15, 000 


colonie s 


6 


Sample s 


15, 001 


or over 


colonie s 


7 


Sample s 






Cream All Grades* 









- 1,000 


colonie s 


35 


Sample s 


1, 001 


- 5,000 


colonie s 


41 


Sample s 


5, 001 


- 10, 000 


colonie s 


14 


Sample s 


10, 001 


- 20, 000 


colonies 


4 


Samples 


20, 001 


- 40, 000 


colonie s 


1 


Sample 


40, 001 


or over 


colonie s 


3 


Sample s 



^Massachusetts Department of Public Health standards for milk and flavored milk drinks are 
10,000 colonies or less per sample; cream grades allow 40,000 colonies or less. 



61 



III. 



Food Sanitation 



Restaurants Inspected 
Soda Fountains 
Bakerie s 
Grocery Stores 
Mobile Canteens 

Ice Cream Manufacturing F stablishments 
School Cafeterias 
Industrial Cafeterias 



15 
7 
5 
26 
12 
3 
8 
2 



Utensils used by the public were periodically tested for bacterial content to determine the 
efficiency of dishwashing and handling. The purpose of this was to discover and prevent the 
transmission of diseases through these utensils. 

IV. Sewage Disposal Sanitation 



Applications for sewerage permits 178 

Sewerage permits granted: 

Older dwellings 14 

New dwellings 148 

Commercial F stablishments 6 

Industries 2 

Other 2 

Sewerage systems inspected and approved 155 

Lots restricted for building 1 

Lots on which restrictions removed 1 



In addition, two subdivisions of land containing 50 lots were presented to the Board of Health 
for approval. Twenty-two of these lots were found to be unsuitable at the time of the sanitary 
survey and were restricted for building purposes. Restrictions placed previously on twenty- 
six lots were removed when the developer fulfilled the requirements of the Board of Health. 

Refuse Disposal 

Garbage collections and disposal of refuse although more properly belonging in a public works 
budget have been a function of the Board of Health for the last few years. The total cost of such 
operations last year accounted for $19, 450. 00 or 67% of the total Board of Health budget. 

Inquiries concerning garbage collections should be made to this office. There is no immediate 
prospect for rubbish collections as such activity is apparently being satisfactorily conducted by 
private collectors. 



VI. 



On the first of the year, the Town Dump will be relocated at another site. The operation carrie 
on will be a sanitary land-fill as opposed to the current burning method as presently employed. 
This will be the trenching, compacting and burying of rubbish. With two licensed and acceptably 
dumping sites in the Town, the Board of Health feels by annual open, competitive bidding, it car 
and will obtain a dump at the lowest possible cost to the Town. This year, Two Thousand 
Dollars ($2,000) was thus saved. 



Recreational Area Sanitation 



I 



Sanitation of the two recreational areas in the Town - Camp Forty Acres and Silver Lake - fall 
within the jurisdiction of the Board of Health. At Camp Forty Acres, the construction of the 
well, privies and bathing area and refuse disposal must be annually inspected and approved. 

62 



Inspections conducted at the Camp this year and analysis of the water supply showed it was 
operating in accordance with the requirements of the Board of Health. 



The situation at Silver Lake this year was somewhat different. During the bathing season, it 
was necessary to make water analysis twice a week for a total of 258 tests. This was because 
for the first time in four years, analyses showed water of high bacterial counts after the week- 
ends. In the mid-week samples, the bacterial count dropped sharply indicating the fact that 
although contamination was high on weekends, the lake was able to assimilate, reduce and 
stabilize the bacteria content quickly after a few days of rest. The Board of Health was there- 
fore reluctant to initiate action to close the lake provided the same situation continued as it did 
throughout the summer. This necessitated a considerable amount of laboratory work and con- 
stant vigilance. A bacterial survey conducted at Silver Lake this year gave the following results: 



Date 


M, P, N. * 


Date 


M. P. 


6/16/58 


17 


7/16/58 


1 300 


6/23/58 


22 


7/23/58 


490 


6/30/58 


3500 


7/28/58 


330 


7/ 2/58 


3500 


7/30/58 


2 30 


11 7/58 


35G0 


8/ 4/58 


3500 


11 9/58 


700 


8/ 6/58 


1 100 


7/14/58 


3500 


8/12/58 


330 



*M. P. N. represents the number of intestinal bacteria of the 
coliform family found in 100 c.c. of water. 



VII, Housing Sanitation 

A number of dwellings were repaired, remodeled or torn down as a result of the housing 
inspection program. 



Occupied Dwellings 

Inspected 7 

Condemned 7 

No. violations found 1 

Vacated 3 

Violations corrected 4 



Unoccupied Dwellings 
Inspected 3 
Condemned 3 
No. violations 1 



5 

s 

c 



VIII. Nuisance Complaints 



In the period, seventy-three complaints were received and investigated. 
Complaint 



No. 

Sewage 25 

Dumping 14 

Unprotected wells, excavations, etc. 9 

Animals 5 

Abandoned ice box 1 

Housing 8 

Inadequate heat 2 

Stagnant water, odors, etc. 3 

Inadequate or unsafe water 2 

Rodents 4 

Milk 1 

Not of public health significance 4 



Abated 
22~ 
11 
8 
5 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 



63 



IX. Miscellaneous Inspections 



Piggeries 19 Recreational Camps 2 

Stables 12 Public Rest Rooms 6 

Town Dump 3 

D. Laboratory 



A total of 1, 651 bacteriological and chemical analyses were made this year on water, milk 
and multi-used food utensils (glasses, forks, plates, etc. ) by the Health Agent. 

No. Satisfactory % Satisfactory 



Milk & Cream 


894 


845 


99. 


4 


Private wells 


371 


244 


65. 


7 


Camp Forty Acres Well 


8 


8 


100. 





Silver Lake 


258 


208 


80. 


6 


Restaurant utensils 


53 


38 


71. 


7 


Schools: 










1/2 pt. school milk 


42 


42 


100. 





Cafeteria utensils 


25 


22 


88. 






E. Permits and Licenses 

Permits and licenses were issued by the Board of Health after investigation and inspection. 



Piggery Licenses 


14 


Refuse transportation permits 


37 


Child care centres 


4 


Wholesale manufacture of ice cream 


1 


Retail manufacture of ice cream 


1 


Anti-freeze permits 


8 


Funeral Directing 


3 


Stable licenses 


9 


Food permits 


55 


Milk Dairy licenses 


21 


Milk Store licenses 


20 


Oleomargarine licenses 


13 


Dump licenses 


2 


Camp license 


1 


Sewerage permits 


172 



Conclusion: The Board of Health is most grateful for the aid rendered to it by the various town 
departments but especially must express its thanks to Wilmington Congregational Church, St. Thomas of 
Villanova Parish and the American Legion for the use of their facilities and halls in conducting the polio anc 
immunization clinics. Without their cooperation and kindness, it would not have been possible to offer this 
protection to the children of Wilmington. Last but not least, the Board of Health is most indebted to those 
ladies who gave of their time and energy to make these clinics a success. 



64 



inspector of animals 



Dog bites reported 

Dogs showing physical signs of rabies 
Animals submitted to laboratory for examination 
(All biting animals were quarantined for the 
period of time prescribed by law, ) 
Animals quarantined 
Animals released from quarantine 
Dogs released from interstate shipment 
Laboratory report: Positive 
Negative 

Premises keeping domestic animals inspected 

Cattle inspected 

Horses inspected 

Swine inspected 

Goats inspected 

Sheep inspected 

Cattle released from interstate shipment 
Cattle reacting to the tuberculin test 



85 





12 
12 



48 
122 
55 
4015 
1 1 
12 





All special work assigned to me by the Department of Livestock Disease Control 
and the Board of Health was attended to promptly. 



0^ 
i 



dog officer 



Dog Licenses 


1053 


Kennels $50. 00 


1 


25. 00 





10. 00 


2 


Dogs Confined 


297 


Complaints covered 


536 


Dogs destroyed 


197 


Dogs disposed of 


260 


Dogs killed by cars 


63 


Resident calls for licenses 


319 



65 



board of public welfare 



Board of Public Welfare: left to right, 
Anna M. Low, Florence Balkus, 
Maurice D. O'Neil, Chairman, and 
Patrick Ring, Agent 




The Wilmington Board of' Public Welfare respectfully submits its report for the year 1958. 

Legislation, both Federal and State, required this Agency to furnish more services and expend 
larger sums of money in 1958 than ever before, and this trend is on the increase. All Legislation (Public 
Assistance) that was approved during 1958 will affect the appropriation for 1959 - plus any possible 1959 
Legislation, 

The appropriations requested for the various categories under the supervision of this Board are 
purely estimates, as it is impossible to determine the needs of the Department at this time. 

The various categories of assistance under the local Board of Public Welfare are - Aid to Depenc 
ent Children, Disability Assistance, Old Age Assistance and General Relief. A general breakdown of these 
categories are as follows: 

Public Welfare: 

During 1958 there were 37 families aided under this type of assistance, with a total expenditure ( 
$9, 134.06. Some of these cases aided have recently moved to Wilmington from other towns and cities, and 
therefore aid granted will be reimbursed. This town had to reimburse other towns and cities for assistanci 
granted to Wilmington settled cases for families living in other communities, also. This Board must call t 
your attention that during 1958 this country went through a slight recession, which had an effect upon our 
appropriation and expenditures. There has been a gradual increase in this type of assistance, partly due to 
the population shift. This Department operates around the economic conditions of the country. For exampl 
when a person is laid off, due to lack of work, he signs for Unemployment Compensation. He must wait 
three weeks for his first check, and this Agency usually carries this family for that period of time, if there 
is no other resource or income. 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

During 1958, fifty-nine children of twenty-two different families were aided, with a total expendi- 
ture of $29,286. 57 under this program. The costs of this type of assistance were shared by the Federal, 
State and local community. This program has increased over the years, even over the efforts of local Agen 

66 



4 



Police and Courts to find and prosecute the deserting parent. There have been recoveries and reimburse- 
ments made to this account by the Federal and State, and by deserting parents, who are under Court order 
to contribute towards the support of their families. 

Disability Assistance: 

During 1958, fifteen cases received a grant from this Board under this particular type of assist- 
ance. The total expenditure for this category amounted to $13, 317. 44. The Federal, State and local also 
participated financially in this program. 



Old Age Assistance: 

The local Bureau of Old Age Assistance has aided 117 cases during 1958, at a total cost of 
$90,714.87. This program - as all others - is on the increase, partly due to the increase and shift in popu- 
lation. This Bureau reimbursed other communities a total of $1,920. 33 for caring for Wilmington settled 
cases during 1958. The costs of this program were shared by the Federal, State and local government. 
Wilmington received money from other cities and towns during the year for caring for settled cases from j' 
these other communities. It is expected that costs of this program will increase because of (a) hospital rates, 
(b) high medical expenses, such as drugs, (c) Nursing Home rates, (d) cost of living, (e) Amendments to the 
present Medical Care Plan, (f) State Legislative and Congressional broadening of this benefit, (g) plus 1959 
Legislation pending before both branches of government, State and Federal. 1^ 

This report would be incomplete unless the local Agency expresses its heartfelt thanks and appre- Lfi 

ciation to the local Fire Department for the prompt and courteous service it has extended and shown in trans- i-j J 
porting the recipients of this Agency to and from Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Also, to the Fire Depart- S 

ment. Knights of Columbus, the employees of Avco, the Community Fund and Wilmington taxi men are due a uj 
great deal of thanks from the Board of Public Welfare for the many favors done and granting of Christmas 
baskets to those in need. 



Administration: CJl 

I* j( 

This covers all expenditures of the Board to administer the four categories. The Federal and C 
State government does not participate in the administration of Public Welfare, but does in the other three |^ 
-categories. Federal reimbursement is based on home visits and all contacts with cases in the office. ~ 

The Social Security Act requires all employees of this Board to be under Civil Service, and the 
salaries of the employees must conform to the Civil Service Compensation Plan (minimum). Mr. A. Ring 
became the permanent Welfare Agent on January 15, 1958; he previously had been acting on a provisional 
appointment, pending the results of the Civil Service examination that was held on June 30, 1957. As yet, 
the local Agency has been unable to secure a permanent, full time Social Worker, but it expects to have one 
in the very near future, as this is a Federal and State requirement. On January 8, 1959, Mrs. Anna Low of 
Woburn Street, Wilmington, was appointed to fill the vacancy on the local Board, by the Town Manager. 
Mrs. Miriam Sullivan of Lake Street, Wilmington, is the Agency's Senior Clerk and Stenographer. 

During the calendar year of 1958 a total of $10,991.28 was expended for the administration of 
Public Assistance. This figure includes salaries, rent, postage, automobile expenses - such as gas and 
general repairs - stationery, dues, publications and office supplies. 



67 



school maintenance department 



High School: 

Filled and painted all cracks in walls where needed 
Washed and refilled filters in Univent 
Replaced floor tiles in Room 120 and Cafeteria 
100 desks and 60 tables sanded and refinished 
Serviced both boilers 

Ceiling and walls washed in Cafeteria 
Cafeteria painted, connplete 
All outside doors painted 

Principal's office washed and painted, complete 
Nurse's office washed and painted, complete 
Dentist's office washed and painted, complete 
Health office washed and painted, complete 
All headers on Cafeteria, Gym and Tin shop 

caulked and painted 
Gym floor sealed 
All stairways painted 
Two soap dispensers installed 
Screens cleaned and replaced in Cafeteria 
Fire escape ladder painted 
Grilles in boys' and girls' Gym repaired 
Replaced mixing valve in dishwashing machine 
Cleaned and repaired sump pump 
All skylights caulked 

Two pickup roll-out paper barrels furnished 

Front door repaired 

Repaired two doors in basement 

All utility tables in kitchen sanded 

Made one utility table 

Repaired and installed casters on tables 
Casters installed on portable refrigerator 
Cement hole in wall and cafeteria floor 
Replaced knobs on cabinet doors 
Textolite covering installed on 37 desks and 

repainted, complete, Room 101 
Set up all rooms in new wing with desks and chairs 

Mildred Rogers School: 

Repaired chain link gate 

Caulked ventilator on roof 

70 desk tops sanded and refinished 

Cracks in walls filled and painted 

All bookcases and woodwork touched up 

Toilet ceiling painted 

New platform and steps installed 

All doors weather stripped 

One pickup roll-out barrel furnished 

One wooden bench made 

All floors washed, filler applied and waxed 

68 



Buzzell School: 

Install shelves in closets in Room 3 and Room 6 
Construct reading tables and benches - 3 classroonr 
Paint boys' and girls' lavatories 

Old asbestos shingles removed and replaced, coppe 
gutters installed, all boards removed and replace 
Roofing paper laid where needed 
Stripped main hallway and refinished 
200 desks stripped, sanded, and refinished 
All bookcases and woodwork touched up 
Gravel all around base of building 
Two outside bells installed 
One pickup roll-out barrel furnished 
Wire screening - all cellar windows 
Insta4rt-new hinges in door in classroom 
Cleaned out basement 

Center School: 



Replaced thresholds both front doors 

Painted corridors, office, coat rooms, boys' and 

girls' lavatories 
Weathe r stripped two doors 
Conductor pipe replaced and painted 
Window ropes replaced 
L brackets installed 
Gutters cleaned out 
Sink painted 

Plug replaced in water cooler 

Replaced plaster in walls in lavatories 

Ceilings in front and second floor hallways repairei 

Basement wall cemented outside and inside 

One outside bell installed 

One pickup roll-out barrel furnished 

One television table manufactured 

Wildwood School: 

Two blackboards made for Library 

Painted and touched up primary wing rooms 

Dead tree removed 

Lines repainted on playground 

Fill spread on edges of play area 

Filled and graded lower end of playground 

All broken windows replaced 

Installed three cinder block ventilation areas 

Installed cinder block bulkhead, complete 

Replaced flooring and tile in west wing 

Drainage trench dug on south side 

Bulkhead painted 



Wildwood School (continued): 



Swain School (continued): 



Tarred around all ventilators on roof over Cafeteria 
Concrete gutter installed at end of exit 
Boiler room door painted 
Door on N-W side painted 
Bulkhead walls waterproofed 

Repaired mixing valve on dishwashing machine 
Three foot drain dug in front of .school for drainage 
Two pickup roll-out barrels furnished 
Three 46" x 10" screens installed in basement 
Overflow tube in classroom repaired 
Check-nut in steam line repaired 
Repaired boys' lavatory, east wing 
{Replaced lock-nut on steam line in boiler room 
Installed plywood in opening in basement 
Extra desks and chairs transported to new addition 
in High School 

I Walker School: 

All seams and cracks caulked on outside of bldg. 
• Two easel boards installed 
Basketball post removed from playground 
Installed new platform railing and steps, complete 
Window glass replaced 

Two "No Ball Playing" signs installed on outside 

of building 
Oil burner and three oil tanks installed 
All cracks in walls filled and painted 
Storm windows hung 
Washed paint in all rooms 
One pickup roll-out barrel furnished 
j Repaired spring hinges in girls' lavatories 
Repaired toilet in boys' room 
Coal bin removed and cellar cleaned out 

I Swain School: 



Tack boards installed, Room 102 and 202 

Repaired window casings 

Reading table supplied, Room 201 

Repaired cement landing, north side 

Painted boys' and girls' lavatories 

Waterproofed and painted gym floor 

Window cords replaced 

Front and rear doors repaired 

Worn tiles replaced where needed 

One outside bell installed 

One pickup and roll-out barrel furnished 

Installed six oval toilet tissue dispensers 

Radiator leaks repaired 

Two television tables and extension cords 
made 

Installed one 275 gal. oil drum 



Repaired and painted six jvimp chairs 

Sanded and refinished 25 combination desk and chair 

sets, complete 
Fire exit door weather stripped 
Door in Principal's room reversed 
Cellar cleaned out 

All extra desks and books transported to new 

addition in High School 
One television table manufactured 

West School: 

Front and rear steps repaired 
Stove pipe and damper replaced 
Three bookcases made and installed 
One two-foot step stool made 
Water glass on boiler repaired 

Whitefield School: 

Second floor windows repaired 

Wall on stairway, south side, repaired and painted 
Lunch room floor painted 

Platform installed and planks replaced on front steps 

Oil burner and three oil tanks installed 

All seams and cracks caulked on outside of building 

and touched up 
Back bulkhead painted 
Window cords replaced 
All wall cracks filled and touched up 
All woodwork touched up 
Teachers' room painted, complete 
Flag pole painted 

Thirty desk tops sanded and refinished 

Leg on portable blackboard repaired 

Glass tube installed on boiler 

Air valve replaced in radiator 

Cellar cleaned out 

One television table manufactured 

Roman House: 

Window cords replaced 

Book shelves manufactured and refinished 
All windows washed 

Polling booths removed and set up for all Town 

elections in High School Cafeteria 
Superintendent sign refinished 

Library: 



Cj 
I* ' 



New screen door installed 



69 



Town Hall: 
Liouver installed 

Paint scale removed from outside of building and 

touched up 
Installed new front steps and railing 
Outside doors repainted 
All cellar sash repainted 
Cellar stairway replaced 
Shelves installed and refinished 
Installed flag pole in front of building 
Stamp machine table manufactured 
Repaired and refinished three desks 

Miscellane ous: 



One warning sign manufactured for approach to 
bridge on Shawsheen Avenue at Billerica line 



In addition to work listed, the following items were 
completed in or on all school buildings in the systen 

Cleaned and overhauled boilers on hot water system 
All pin-up boards in all classrooms repainted 
Repainted all school warning signs 
All chalk boards cleaned and treated with a re - 
juvenator 

All wooden platforms and steps on exits treated witl 

a protective coat of oil 
All fire extinguishers checked and recharged 
All windows washed 

High School septic tanks pumped out, all others 
che eked 

All Venetian blinds washed and repaired 

All storage rooms and cellars inspected and cleane< 

All schools inspected for sand and rock salt 



In conclusion I want to thank personally all Town Departments for services rendered to this 
department. It is cooperation such as this which helps maintain our schools, which is a home for the child- 
ren away from home. 






■lAiJI 



John Amaro and James Downs look on 

at start of Wildwood School repair project 



70 



recreation eomtnission 



The program of the Recreation Commission has continued for another year with the same aims 
and objectives as previously with some progress as evidenced by increased attendance and participation. 
Tennis instruction has been added, and a boys' baseball program in competition with official recreation 
league teams of nearby towns. 

Summer Activity: 



A. Silver Lake Beach, attendance some days reached 500, swimming 
lessons to 162, life saving instruction to 42. 

B. Four Playgrounds gave supervised play and creative work in crafts, 
music, nature, etc: 

1. Wildwood School 152 

2. High School 363 

3. Mildred Rogers School 285 

4. Athletic Field 120 

C. Mens' Softball League - 160 men participated 



Fall and Winter: 

A. Gym programs at the High School 

1. Wednesday evenings for ladies 

2. Thursday and Saturday for men 

3. Saturday afternoons for boys 

B. Cooperation with other groups in perpetuating Wilmington's fame in 
the skating world. 

The Commission strives to meet its responsibility in the recreational life of the town while rerrl 
bering its economic limitations. Because of the dedication and talents of its personnel under the leadersl^ 
of Mr. Lawrence Cushing, director, the Commission has a program which invites the newer residents' j 
investigation, aid, and participation. 

The Planning Board through its Park Department, the Board of Health through its Sanitarian, tl 
Police Department, the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager, the School Department and many others 
contribute immeasurably to our program, and to them we are grateful. 




recreation 




housing authority 



Once again, it was a very busy year for the Wilmington Housing Authority. Last year we were ] 
the process of starting housing for the elderly and urban renewal. Today both of these projects are well 
under way. In all, the Wilmington Housing Authority has three projects which are denoted as follows: 

Veterans Housing Wilmington 200 - 1 State 

Housing for the Elderly Wilmington 667-1 State 

Urban Renewal Wilmington R- 12 Federal 

Veterans Housing and Housing for the Elderly are both a tax free subsidized program in public 
ownership with a forty-year period of amortization. Rentals are charged on the basis of income, and the 
ability of the tenants to pay such rental. 

Veterans Housing (200-1) is entirely for veterans of low income in need of good housing who hav 
been living under inferior housing conditions. It allows him to live in a clean, sanitary home at a rent he 
can afford. We have, as you know, thirteen of these single dwellings. 

There has been very little change in the occupancy of the dwellings this year. Repairs have bee 
kept at a minimum without neglect to the property, and very little expense is expected this year as the 
property is in very good condition. 

Project 667-1, referred to as Housing for the Elderly is nearing completion. The Wilmington 
Housing Authority made application to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for financial assistance on 
November 12, 1957. The resolution authorizing the issuance of notes in the amount of $400,000 was appro 
November 26, 1957. The notes were sold, and the money placed in the Middlesex County National Bank, 
Wilmington, Mass. Preliminary plans were presented and accepted February 25, 1958, bids sent out and 
the contract to build was approved and awarded June 10, 1958 to the Roberto Construction Co. , Wakefield, 
Mass. Ground was broken within two weeks, and the buildings have taken shape. 

There are ten buildings, 80 feet long by 24 feet deep, one story high; each building to have four 
apartments of three rooms and bath (kitchen-dinette, living room and bedroom). The kitchens are comple 
with cabinets, refrigerator and range. The bathrooms and bedrooms have an emergency buzzer which, wl 
pushed, rings a buzzer in the next apartment and automktically unlocks the front door allowing the tenant i 
the next apartment to give any necessary aid or call for such aid that might be necessary. Additional con- 
veniences in each apartment are the inclusion of a telephone jack and television antenna jack. 

The buildings are so arranged along a 600 -foot drive and cul-de-sac as to give the appearance o 
a circle. This drive has been named Deming Way after one of the town's outstanding citizens, Harry R. 
Deming. 

The grading of the grounds cannot be completed until the spring due to the depth of frost, howev* 
twenty-five apartments will be ready for occupancy February 1, 1959, and the remaining fifteen are to be 
ready for occupancy February 21, 1959. 

A great deal of thought has been put into the building of this project by the Wilmington Housing 
Authority and the State Housing Board with reference to construction, maintenance, convenience and appe 

ance. We are now adding another building for a Community Hall for the use of the tenants of the project. 
This building will include a recreational hall, kitchen and a laundry with two automatic washers and two 

dryers. We are in hopes this building will be completed by March 1, 1959. 



78 



Urban Renewal (R-12) is progressing satisfactorily. At the close of last year, we were waiting 
for the report establishing the need of Urban Renewal. We have received a favorable report and have about 
completed the second section, "Relocation and Eligibility" forms which were sent to the Regional office for 
their inspection. The Regional office, in turn, returned same for additional information which they require. 
This work is in progress and will be forwarded to the Regional office February 1, 1959. 

This brings us to the third and last stage, "Loan and Grant", for which we have made application. 
This is an eighteen months project and requires all the data for planning appraisals, land redevelopment 
and land use, etc. 

May we take this opportunity to express our thanks to the various town departments for their 
cooperation. 



Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1958 



667-1 

Development Fund 
Development Cost 
Incomplete Contracts 
Structure s 
Site 



TOTAL 



Assets 



$121, 054. 32 
400,450. 02 
57, 957. 45 
353,797. 80 
13, 051. 20 



$946, 310. 79 



Liabilitie s 
Real Estate Taxes Payable 
Contract Retentions 
Notes Authorized 
Accrued Interest 
Contract Awards 
Contract Default 

TOTAL 



Balance Sheet as of June 30, 1958 



200-1 



Assets 



Liabilities 



Administration Fund 
Security Deposit 
Reading Coop. Bank 
Accounts Receivable 
Premium Fund 
Prepaid Insurance 
^Development Cost 198,000. 
Liquidated 18,000. 



00 
00 



2, 940. 52 
350. 00 

2,000. 00 
281. 36 
4. 34 
336. 48 

180, 000. 00 



Accrued Pilot 

Matured Interest & Principal 
Security Deposit 
Bonds Authorized 198,000.00 
Less Notes Retired 18, 000. 00 
Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 

Operating Deficit 



$ 25.17 
20, 821. U 
500,000. 00 
608. 06 
424, 806. 45 
50. 00 

$946, 310. 79 



2 34. 00 
6, 596. 20 
350. 00 

180, 000. 00 
3, 395. 00 
896. 92 

191,472. 12 
5, 559. 42 



3 



TOTAL 185, 912. 70 185, 912. 70 

Siimmary Statement 200-1. . . . . Dec. 31, 1958 



Number of Tenants 

Average Rent $49, 

Rent 



13 
00 



Admission & Income Limits 
Small families 
less than three minors 



'$49. 00 admission 
$51.00 continued occupancy 
$54. 00 continued occupancy 
$58. 00 continued occupancy (maximum) 
$70. 00 ineligible (over) 



$3500. 00 



3700. 
3900. 
4000. 



00 
00 
00 



4000. 00 



Large families 
3 or more minors 
3800. 00 
4000. 00 
4200. 00 
4300. 00 
4300. 00 



79 



JURY LIST 
Revised - August 4, 1958 



Name 


Residence 


Occupation 


Andersen, David E. 


Park Street 


Livestock Farmer 


Anderson, William A. 


Westdale Avenue 


Supervisor 


Babine, Wilfred M. 


56 High Street 


Stationary Engineer 


*Backman, Hazel E, 


151 Chestnut Street 


Housewife 


Barton, Joseph J. 


104 West Street 


Maintenance 


Bate s, Donald A. 


2 Hawthorne Road 


Design Draftsman 


Beers, William A. 


3 Truman Road 


Electrical Engineer 


Bennett, Richard E. 


44 Columbia Street 


Offset Feeder 


Berry, William 


97 Nichols Street 


Aircraft Maintenance Mechan 


Biggar, Ralph H. 


272 Middle sex Avenue 


Security Analyst 


Billings, Weyman H. 


21 Strout Avenue 


Technical Engineer 


Bischoff, Otto F. 


56 Burlington Avenue 


Manager 


*Braman, Marion V. 


4 Fairmeadow Road 


Electrician 


*Butt, Rose V. 


1 Dayton Road 


Housewife 


Cantrell, Cecil W. Jr. 


42 Andover Street 


Fiscal Officer -Accountant 


Case, Edgar 


2 Glenview Road 


Carpenter 


*Case, Mary G. 


2 Glenview Road 


Housewife 


Gates, Howard L. 


3 Sheridan Road 


Safety Engineer 


Ghamberlin, Austin E. 


2 Glendale Circle 


Factory Worker 


Childs, William G. 


8 Linda Road 


Central Office Switchman 


*Growley, Agnes C. 


Longview Road 


Housewife 


♦ Gurtin, Pauline A. 


261 Glen Road 


Housewife 


Goursey, Charles H. 


Wing Road 


Asst. Section Head -GontracI 


Cox, David M. 


216 Wildwood Street 


T.V, Writer & Teacher 


*Creelman, Alice M. 


571 Woburn Street 


Housewife 


Gutter, Harry J. 


17 Belmont Avenue 


Carpenter 


Cyrus, George S. 


McDonald Road 


Chef 


*Deming, Christine M. 


56 Federal Street 


Housewife 


*Delaronde, Edith 


99 Shawsheen Avenue 


Housewife 


Denault, Noah F. 


5 Glendale Circle 


Shipper 


DeVita, Francis L. 


10 Lockwood Road 


Machinist 


Dowling, Laurence H. 


4 Hawthorne Road 


Operations Analyst 


*Drover, Dorothy E. 


4 Hilltop Road 


Nurse's Aid 


*Dyas, Marjorie L. 


8 Fairmeadow Road 


Production Clerk 


Eisener, Warren R. 


11 Jere Road 


Manufacturing Engineering 


Elliott, John E. 


102 Lake Street 


Maintenance 


Elwell, Russell T. 


Shady Lane Drive 


Yard Foreman 


Erickson, Hartley G. 


580 Woburn Street 


Machinist 


Evans, Royal H. Jr. 


707 Woburn Street 


General Manager 


Fossey, Reginald L. 


Marion Street 


Maintenance Welder 


*Fairweather , Mary 


24 Liberty Street 


Housewife 


Fawcett, Howard W. 


259 Lowell Street 


Truck driver 


*Fay, Isabelle R. 


18 Brand Avenue 


Asst. Bookkeeper 


Foye, John E. 


73 West Street 


Shipwright 


Fritz, Ferdinand E. 


18 Fairmeadow Road 


Millman 


*Frost, Doris P. 


127 Church Street 


Housewife 


*Fuller, Mary L. 


147 Main Street 


Meat Packer 


*Gager, Virginia 


12 Powder House Circle 


Housewife 


Gardner, Thomas W. 


725 Woburn Street 


'I'ruck driver 


Gerhartz, Conrad J. 


Pleasant Road 


App. & Methods Planning 


Gillis, Alexander 


Randolph Road 


Retired 


Goldsworth, Alexander 


1 19 Church Street 


Carpenter 



80 



Name 


Residence 


Occupation 


t Gomes, Louis V. Jr. 


14 Marion Street 


Cabinet Finisher 


Gustus, Walter J. 


16 Brand Avenue 


Foreman 


Huntley, Nelson F. 


109 Burlington Avenue 


Short Order Cook 


Irwin, John R. 


17 Glendale Circle 


Piping Designer 


Irwin, William K. 


9 Glendale Circle 


Electrical Engineer 


Jamison, Ernest W. 


345 Woburn Street 


Metallurgical Engineer 


*Jepson, Mildred L. 


136 Fames Street 


Sale swoman 


Johnston, Frederick T, 


8 Fairmeadow Road 


Laborer 


Johnson, George F. Jr. 


Chase Street 


Postal Worker 


Kelleher, Robert G. 


3 Coolidge Road 


Methods Analyst 


Keller, Richard D. 


4 West Street 


Newspaper Web Pressman 


Kemp, John S. 


150 West Street 


Chief Engineer 


*Kendall, Gladys M. 


291 Woburn Street 


Housewife 


♦Kitchener, Ruth M. 


Aldrich Road 


Housewife 


Lacey, Thomas A. 


93A West Street 


Oil Burner Serviceman 


*Leavitt, Hazel M. 


9 Hathaway Road 


Housewife 


Lewis, Vinal E. 


72 Church Street 


Travel Agent 


*Low, Anna M. 


585 Woburn Street 


Customs Clerk 


Lyons, Alta 


6 Fairmeadow Road 


Sale sper son 


Malone, Albert S. 


1 35 Church Street 


Real Estate Broker 


Maloney, Robert 


Birchwood Road 


Rural Carrier 


*Mayo, Eleanor W. 


16 Suncrest Avenue 


Secretary 


McCabe, Robert W. 


403 Woburn Street 


Transmissionman 


McLean, Frank H. 


32 Salem Street 


Metal's Processing Tech. 


Moore, Arthur 


5 Ledgewood Road 


Instrument Maker 


*Murphy, Mary E. 


326 Ballardvale Street 


Housewife 


Oatley, George L. 


142 West Street 


Welder 


Oberg, Carl H. 


Perry Avenue Extension 


Clerk 


*Oberg, Florance B. 


Perry Avenue Extension 


Housewife 


O'Hara, James J. 


4 South Street 


Electrician 


O'Leary, Phyllis M, 


44 Swain Road 


Clerk 


*0'Neil, A. Josephine 


2 5 High Street 


Housewife 


Perry, Robert E. 


Taplin Avenue 


Carpenter 


*Porter, Florence V. 


Longview Road 


Registered Nurse 


Reagan, Geraldine E, 


5 Fairview Avenue 


Bank Teller 


*Reid, Josephine M. 


216 Lowell Street 


Stenographer 


Riccelli, Carmen J. 


95 Shawsheen Avenue 


Post Office Clerk 


Robinson, Frank E. 


Bates Avenue 


Supervisor of Maintenance 


1 Ross, Ethel M. 


96 Grove Avenue 


General Office Worker 


Russell, William H. 


10 Wildwood Street 


Clerk 


Sharp, Norman R, 


Larson Road 


Bakery Receiver 


Sharp, Walter E. 


Larson Road 


General Helper 


Sheehan, Frederick 


123 West Street 


Truck driver 


*Skoglund, Mary G. 


14 Suncrest Avenue 


Telephone Operator 


Solow, Harry Jr. 


Salem Street 


General Worker 


Steeves, Glenn J. 


38 Marcus Road 


Body Man and Painter 


Stevens, Rufus S. Ill 


I Glendale Circle 


Sale sman 


Stowe, Ernest B. 


3 Meadow Lane 


Campaign Organizer 


*Traer, Doris E. 


611 Woburn Street 


Housewife 


Trickett, David W, 


11 Suncrest Avenue 


Electrician 


Wagstaff, Anna 


34 Hobson Avenue 


Housewife 


Wagstaff, Bernard F. 


Pleasant Road 


Sale smanager 


Weed, John E. 


2 Essex Street 


Maint. of Electronics 


Young, Ruth M. 


430 Middlesex Ave. 


Re ceptionis t- Typist 


Zaccagnini, Lorenzo 


305 Middlesex Ave. 


Clothes Presser 



^Indicates married woman 

81 

i 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Street 
Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Auburn Avenue 
Ayotte Street 

Baker Street 
Ballardvale St. 
Bancroft Street 
Bartlett Street 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Belmont Ave. 
Birchwood Road 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Ave. 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Burnap Street 
Burt Road 
Butters Row 



From 
Middlesex Ave. 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Salem Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Westdale Ave. 

Brand Avenue 
Salem Street 
Liberty Street 
King Street 
Church Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Columbia St. 
Judith Road 
Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 
Mass. Avenue 
Woodside Ave. 
Main Street 
Norfolk St. 
Main Street 
Grove Avenue 
Cedar Street 
Main Street 



To 

Parker St, 
Billerica 
Andover Line 



Miles Feet 



4600 



Silver Lake Pk. 
Andover Line 
B & M R.R. 
Broad Street 
Belmont Ave. 
Byron Street 
State Street 
Short Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Baker Street 
Garden Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Both Ways 
Burlington Line 
Winchell Road 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Chestnut Street 



1.2 
2. 3 



2. 7 



0. 8 



0. 3 



1.6 



800 
800 

700 

400 
400 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1550 

2370 
1100 
907 

1377 

1378 
2500 



0. 6 



Date(s) Accepted 

3-02-08 
11-06-94 
1 1-06-94 

3-12-45 

3-10-47 

3-12-45 
11-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-12-45 
3-01-15 
3-10-47 
3-03-33 

3-17-52 3-10-53 
11-06-94 

3-13-33 3-08-43 

3-12-45 

6-21-38 
11-06-94 

3-13-54 
11-06-94 

3-12-45 3-10-53 

3-12-45 3-11-46 
11-06-94 



82 



street 
Carson Avenue 
Carter Lane 
Cedar Avenue 

Cedar Street 
Central Street 
Chandler Road 
Chapman Avenue 
Chase Road 
Chestnut Street 
Church Street 
Clark Street 
Cochrane Road 
Columbia Street 
Concord Street 
Cook Avenue 
Coolidge Road 
Corey Avenue 
Cottage Street 
Cross Street 
Cunningham St. 
Cypress Street 

Davis Road 
Dayton Road 
Dell Drive 
Dobson Street 
Dorchester St. 



From 
Hathaway Road 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Oakwood Road 
Harris Street 
Middlesex Ave. 
Kelley Road 
Hathaway Road 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Ave. 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Forest St. 
Church Street 
Federal Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Grand Street 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Glen Road 

Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Ave. 
Glen Road 
Billerica Line 



To 

Both Ways 

Faulkner Road 
Burt Road 
Church Street 
Adams Street 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



Woburn Line 
Middlesex Ave. 
Church Street 
Warren Road 
Talbot Ave. 
N. Reading Line 
Kensington Ave. 

Shawsheen Road 

Lowell Street 
Essex Street 



2. 1 
0. 8 
0. 8 

0. 1 

1. 1 



677 
1400 
600 
600 
574 
400 
322 
297 



800 



Cary Street 



1000 
270 
370 
920 
900 

1400 
260 

500 
170 
450 
1402 
1400 



3-10-53 3-12-55 

3-09-57 

3-05-51 

3-12-45 

10- 16-50 
3-09-57 
3-05-51 
3-10-53 

11- 06-94 
11-06-94 
11-06-94 

3-10-47 

3-02-08 3-13-33 
11-06-94 

3-11-46 

3-05-51 

3-05-51 

3-13-54 
11-06-94 

3-13-44 3-17-52 

3-05-51 

3-17-52 
3-05-51 
3-08-58 
3-13-54 
3-05-51 



n 

0'- 

H 





83 



street 
Dublin Avenue 
Dunton Road 

Fames Street 
Edwards Road 
Essex Road 

Fairfield Road 
Fairmeadow Road 
Fairview Avenue 
Faulkner Avenue 
Faulkner Road 
Fay Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Street 

Garden Court 
Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Gowing Road 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 

Harding Street 
Harnden Street 
Harris Street 



From 

Main Street 
Nassau Avenue 

Main Street 
Forest St. 
Jamaica Ave . 

Main Street 
Nichols St. 
State Street 
Glen Road 
Faulkner A^e. 
Glen Road 
Middlesex Ave. 
Main Street 
Aldrich Road 

Burt Street 
Main Street 
Glen Road 
Park Street 
Forest Road 
Federal Street 
Main Street 
West Street 

Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
Burlington Ave. 



To 

Both Ways 

Woburn St. 
Baldwin Road 
Beeching Ave. 

Nichols St. 

Faulkner Road 
Jamaica Ave. 
Gary Street 
Woburn Street 

Burlington Ave. 

Shawsheen Road 
Middlesex Ave. 
Glen Road 
Marcus Road 

B & M R.R. 

Lake Street 
Reading Line 

Lubbers Brook 
Glen Road 
Cedar Street 



Miles Feet Date( s) Accepted 
500 3-05-51 
638 3-10-56 



0. 7 



1. 1 



0. 8 



1. 3 



0. 4 
0. 5 

0. 1 



450 
920 

1300 
2 328 
650 
671 
2000 
700 

572 



1 1 -06-94 
3-10-47 
3-10-53 

3-1 1-46 
3-08-58 
3-13-33 
3-13-44 
3-10-53 
6-21-38 

11-06-94 
3-05-51 

11-06-94 



654 3-12-55 
1 1 -06-94 
1300 3-17-52 
900 3-10-56 
850 3-17-52 
780 3-08-43 
9-29-10 
11-06-94 



3-12- 



250 



700 



3-05-51 
3-04-95 
3-12-45 



84 



street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 

Hawthorne Road 
High Street 
Highland Road 
Hillside Way 
Hob son Avenue 
Hob son Street 

Hopkins Street 

Jaquith Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 

Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kiernan Ave. 
King Street 

Lake Street 
Lang Street 
(ji Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence St. 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 



From 
Main Street 
Woburn Street 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Ave. 
Salem Street 
Chestnut St. 
Bridge Lane 
Main Street 
Shaw she en Ave. 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Glen Road 
Birchwood Rd. 

Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
Glen Road 

Main Street 
Bancroft St. 
Temple St. 
Lawrence St. 
Glendale Circle 
Federal Street 
Federal Street 
High Street 
Main Street 



To 

River Street 

Tennyson Ave. 
Woburn Street 

Burlington Line 
Lubbers Brook 
Hob son Avenue 
Billerica Line 



Miles Feet 



Cedar Crest Rd. 

Blanchard Road 

Broad Street 

Shawsheen Ave. 
B & M R. R. 
Parker St. 

Shady Lane Drive 
B & M R. R. 
B & M R.R. 



0. 5 



0. 5 



0. 5 



1.0 



430 
1296 
230 

1040 

950 
800 



1250 
719 
520 

923 
1300 

693 
2000 

400 
657 
683 
3773 
740 
720 
1780 
1050 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-05-51 

3-05-51 3-10-53 
3-10-56 
11-06-94 
3-05-51 
3-02-14 

3-05-51 3-17-52 
3-12-45 
11-06-94 

3-08-48 3/49 3/51 

6-10-40 

3-10-53 

3-09-57 
3-12-45 
3-08-58 

6-10-40 3-12-45 

11-06-94 

3-17-52 
10-16-50 

3-10-56 

3-10-56 

3-08-43 

3-08-43 
10-16-50 

3-05-51 



c 3 

D ' 



85 



Street 
Lockwood Road 
Lowell Street 

Mackey Road 
Main Street 
Marcus Road 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Ave, 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 
Miller Road 
Morse Ave. 
Mystic Ave. 

Nassau Avenue 
Nichols Street 
Nickerson Ave. 
Norfolk Avenue 
North Street 

Oak Street 
Oakdale Road 
Oakridge Circle 
Oakridge Road 
Oakwood Road 
Olson Road 



From 
Ballardvale St. 
Main Street 

Federal Street 
Tewksbury Line 
Gowing Road 
Burlington Ave. 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Suncre st Ave . 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Glen Road 
Woburn St. 
Middlesex Ave. 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Shawsheen Ave. 
West Street 
Carter Lane 
Middlesex Ave. 

Salem Street 
Judith Road 
Gowing Road 
Suncre st Ave, 
Main Street 
Church Street 



To 

Reading Line 

Woburn Line 
Gowing Road 
Fenway St. 

St. Paul St. 
Tewksbury Line 

Salem Street 
Hobson Ave . 
Cedar Ave. 



Miles Feet 
990 

1.9 



Birch Road 
Shawsheen River 

Nassau Ave. 
Dadant Drive 

Short Street 
Gowing Road 

Fairfield Road 



4. 



2. 3 



0. 7 



250 

2315 
900 

1550 
800 

1424 
363 

400 
640 
1 361 
598 

2000 

900 
538 
3533 

350 
2280 
1730 
365 
850 
132 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-09-57 
11-06-94 

3-08-43 
11-06-94 

3-08-58 

3-12-45 

3-05-51 

3-12-45 

3-13-44 

3-09-57 
1 1 -06-94 

3-12-45 

3-12-45 

10- 16-39 
3-02-08 

3-1 1-46 

11- 06-94 
3-10-47 
3-13-54 

3-12-45 3-13- 

3-19-51 
10-16-50 
3-08-58 
3-10-56 
3-1 1-46 
3-09-57 



86 



Street 
Park Street 
Parker Street 
Parker St. Ext. 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pine Street 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Powder House Circle 

Railroad Avenue 
aollins Road 
tloosevelt Road 

Salem Street 
school Street 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Jhawsheen Road 
iheridan Road 
jilver Lake Ave. 
jprucewood Road 
Jtate Street 
itrout Avenue 
[iuncrest Avenue 
iwain Road 



From 
Woburn Street 
Lowell Street 
Sheldon Avenue 
Dell Drive 
Federal St, 
Wiser Street 
Main Street 
Central Street 
Birchwood Road 
Middlesex Ave. 

Clark Street 
Fenway Street 
Boutwell St. 

Tewksbury Line 
Middlesex Ave. 
Hathaway Road 
Middlesex Ave. 
Main Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Hathaway Road 
Lake Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Belmont Ave. 
Lowell Street 
West Street 
Fore st Street 



To 

N. Reading Line 
Sheldon Avenue 
Blackstone St. 
Dell Drive 
B & M R. R. 
Wild Avenue 
Hob son Ave . 
Adelman Road 
Shady Lane Drive 

Chase Street 
Marion Street 
Burlington Ave. 

N. Reading Line 
High School Lot 

Lawrence St. 
Billerica Line 
Corey Avenue 

Carter Street 
Short Street 
Fairview Ave. 



Burlington Ave. 
87 



Miles Feet 
0. 9 
0. 33 
0. 3 

595 
720 

1800 
400 
450 

1 332 
730 

0.2 

200 
2000 

2. 7 

616 
380 
2676 

2.2 

857 
487 
455 
600 
275 
686 
1246 

0. 4 



Date(s) Accepted 
11 06-94 
3-04-07 
3-03-19 
3-08-58 
3-08-43 

3-11-46 3-13-54 

3-12-45 

3-10-53 

3-13-54 

3-13-54 

3-01-09 
3-13-54 
3-1.1-46 

11-06-94 3-05-06 

3-01-15 

3-12-55 

3-08-58 
1 1 -06-94 
10-16-39 

3-05-51 

3-1 3-54 

3-17-52 

3-03-33 

3-17-55 

3-1 3-54 

3-20-22 10-16-39 



on' 
c 



I 



Street 
Swain Road West 

Taft Road 
Taplin Ave. 
Temple Street 
Thurston Ave. 
Truman Road 

Upton Court 

Veranda Ave. 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Ave, 
Washington Street 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
Winchell Road 
Wing Road 
Wiser Street 
Woburn Street 
Woodlawn Avenue 



From 
Forest Street 

Burlington Ave. 
Hobson Avenue 
Church Street 
Church Street 
Hathaway Road 

Andover Street 

Main Street 

N. Reading Line 

Main Street 
Lake St. Tewk. 
Clark Street 
Mass. Ave. 
Woburn Street 
West Street 
Warren Road 
Grove Avenue 
Middlesex Ave. 
Main Street 
Federal Street 
Grove Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Main Street 
Andover Street 
Main Street 



To 

Burlington Line 

Boutwell St. 
Lubbers Brook 



Ballardvale St. 



Lubbers Brook 



Chase Street 

Reading Line 
B & M R.R. 
Albert Street 
B & M R. R. 
Woburn St. 

B & M R. R. 

Burnap Street 

Taplin Ave. 
Woburn Line 
Kensington Ave, 

88 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 
965 10-16-39 

3237 6-21-38 
900 3-11-46 
274 6-06-11 
3-04-07 
300 3-10-53 

11-06-94 

1076 3-06-16 
1200 3-13-54 



0, 2 



0, 1 



0. 3 



1. 7 



0. 2 

1. 1 



42 3 
100 

1000 

1211 
230 



4, 2 



693 
760 
200 
746 

900 

250 



3-08-58 
3-13-54 
3-01-20 

10- 16-50 

1 1 - 06-94 
6-22-42 
3-13-54 

12- 29-10 
1 1 -06-94 

6-10-40 
3-08-43 
3-12-45 
3-08-58 

10- 16-50 

11- 06-94 
3-17-52 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING JANUARY 20, 1958 HERBERT C. BARROWS AUDITORIUM 



The Special Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 8. 12 P.M. 



Mr, Simon Cutter, Town Moderator read the introduction to the Warrant. On a motion by Mr. 
was voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. Motion adopted unanimously. 



S. Webber it 



Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken at the Special Town Meeting on Aug. 8, 1957 
under Article 16 of the Warrant for said meeting, whereby the Town voted to borrow and appropriate the sum 
of $400, 000. 00 and authorized the use of the unexpended balance of the funds or bond issue voted at the 
Annual Town Meeting held March 13, 1954 for constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an addition 
to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High School Building on Church Street, or do anything in relation 
thereto. On request of the Junior -Senior High School Building Committee. Finance Committee approved. 



The following motion was made by Mr. Ered T. Corum. 

Motion: That the action taken at the Special Town Meeting on August 8, 1957, under Article 16 of the Warrant 
for said meeting, whereby the Town voted to borrow and appropriate the sum of Eour Hundred Thousand 
Dollars ($400, 000. 00) and authorized the use of the unexpended balance of the funds or bond issue voted at the 
Annual Town Meeting held March 13, 1954, for constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an addi- 
t| tion to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High School Building on Church Street be rescinded. Motion 
adopted unanimously. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for constructing and origi- 
nally equipping and furnishing an addition to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High School Building on 
Church Street, determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from avail- 
able funds, by borrowing or otherwise, determine how the same shall be expended, or take any action rela- 
tive thereto. On request of the Junior -Senior High School Building Committee. Finance Committee approved. 

The following motion was made by Mr. Fred T. Corum: 
iji Motion: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of Four Hundred Thousand Dollars ($400, 000. 00) for 
constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an addition to or extension of the present Junior -Senior 
High School Building on Church Street, and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow up to the sum of Four Hundred Thousand Dollars 
($400,000.00) under authority of Chapter 645, Acts of 1948, as amended, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor payable in not more than twenty years. The present Junior-Senior High School Building 
Committee is authorized to enter into contracts and to do all things that are necessary for constructing, 
equipping and furnishing the said addition or extension. Motion adopted unanimously. 



(9 ■] 
i J 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer all the unexpended balance of approximately Seventy-five 
Thousand Dollars of a bond issue previously authorized by vote of the Town at the Annual Town Meeting held 
March 1 3, 1954 in the amount of One Million Three Hundred Thousand Dollars, for constructing and origin- 
ally equipping and furnishing an addition to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High School (said project 
having been completed) and appropriate said balance to be used toward constructing and originally equipping 
and furnishing a further addition to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High School or do anything in 
relation thereto. On request of the Junior -Senior High School Building Committee. Finance Committee 
approved. 

The following motion was made by Mr. Fred T. Corum: 

Motion: There is herby transferred from the proceeds of the bond issue of One Million Three Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($1, 300, 000. 00) voted by the Town at the Annual Meeting held March 1 3, 1954, for con- 
structing and originally equipping and furnishing an addition to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High 
School on Church Street, all the unexpended balance of approximately Seventy-five Thousand Dollars ($75,000) 
which balance is hereby appropriated for the purpose of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a 
further addition to or extension of the present Junior -Senior High School, and the present Junior -Senior High 



89 



School Building Committee is authorized to enter into contracts and to do all things that are necessary for 
constructing, equipping and furnishing the said addition or extension. Motion adopted unanimously. 

There being no further business the Special Town Meeting was declared adjourned at 8. 25 P. M. (Probably 
the shortest meeting on record, only thirteen minutes long. ) 

There were one hundred seventy-seven (177) voters present. (By-Law Section 18, page 8 of Chapter 2 - 
one hundred and fifty voters at a Town Meeting shall constitute a quorum). 

A true copy: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Attest Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 1, 1958 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Harry J, Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington. 

GREETINGS: - In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote it 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Cafeteria, Saturday, the first day of March, A.D. 195f 
at 9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the pools to be opened at 10. 00 A. M. , and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. for t 
election of Town Offices: 

Article 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named Offices, to wit: One 
Selectman for the term of three years; two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
One Member of the School Committee for the term of one year (to fill an unexpired term); one Moderator for 
the term of one year; one Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and Town affairs therein, to assemble subsequently and 
meet in Town Meeting at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium, Church St. , in said Town of Wilmington on 
Saturday, the 8th day of March, A. D. 1958, 

In accordance with the above the meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 9.45 A.M. The warrant a; 
above was read by the Moderator and on a motion by Mr. Charles Ellsworth it was voted to dispense with 
further reading of the warrant. 

The ballot box was examined by the Moderator, Town Clerk and Police. It was found to be empty and to 
register 0000. The checkers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties and the ballots distributl. 

The polls were declared open at 10. 00 A. M. The polls were declared closed at 8. 00 P. M. Following 
is the vote as declared by the Moderator. 

Selectmen - 3 years 

Elected Nicholas L, DeFelice, eight hundred ninety-one 
Paul Godzyk, three hundred thirty 
Edward J. Sullivan, three hundred forty-six 
All others, one 
Blanks, thirty-nine 



891 
330 
346 
1 

39 
1607 



90 



School Committee - 3 years 

Elected Dudley A. Buck, one thousand one hundred ninety-nine 1199 

Pearl H. Hersom, five hundred thirty-one 531 

M. Flora Kasabuski, four hundred two 402 

I Elected Henry Sullivan, six hundred twenty-two 622 

All others, None 

Blanks, four hundred and sixty 460 

3214 

School Committee - 1 year (to fill an unexpired term) 

Elected Edward Page, one thousand two hundred twenty-seven 1227 

All others, three 3 

Blanks, three hundred seventy-seven 377 

1607 

Moderator - 1 year 

Elected Simon Cutter, one thousand three hundred twenty-five 1325 

All others, two 2 

Blanks, two hundred eighty 2 80 

1607 

I Wilmington Housing Authority - Five years 

William R. Coulter, Three hundred seventy-nine 379 

Anna M. Low, two hundred nineteen 219 

Elected Frank H. McLean, Five hundred thirteen 513 ^ 

Marion C. Murphy, Two hundred eighty 280 f. 

All others, None " , 

J 

Blanks, Two hundred sixteen 216 1' 

1607 5 1 

QUESTION: 1 2 

"Shall the Town of Wilmington accept the provisions of Section 47 of Chapter 31 as amended of the '; ^ 

General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, (Ter. Ed. ) as they apply to the official and labor ■ , 

services of the Town of Wilmington, a fair and concise summary of which appears below: * 

Acceptance of the provisions of Section 47 of Chapter 31 as amended of the General Laws of the ^ |j 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Ter. Ed. ) as they apply to the labor service of the Town of Wilmington would I y 

place under Civil Service the positions of laborers, skilled laborers, mechanics and craftsmen in the entire : 

labor service of the Town of Wilmington and as they apply to the official service of the Town of Wilmington E 

would place under Civil Service such positions as clerks of the various boards (excepting the clerk of the > 
Board of Selectmen), building inspector, wiring inspector, school nurse, etc. , but not including heads of the 

principal departments such as highway superintendent. " Yes - 471 No - 1010 Blanks - 126 

There were 1607 persons voted. The vote was read by the Moderator at 8.45 P.M. 

A true copy: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Attest Town Clerk 



> 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING - March 8, 1 9 58 - High School Gymnasium 

At 1. 30 P.M. March 8, 1958 the Meeting was called to order by the Moderator in the Barrows Auditorium in 
accordance with the warrant. On a motion by Mr. Charles Black it was voted to adjourn to the gymnasium to 
accommodate the expected number of voters. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order in the High School Gymnasium at 1. 45 P. M. Prayer was offered 
by Reverent Edmund Croke. 

Mr. Joseph Courtney, Town Manager, spoke briefly, saying that he would like to thank all the citizens of the 
town for their cooperation and kindness during his time as Town Manager. 



91 



Article 2. To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. A report of the High School Building 
Committee was read by Mr. Fred Corum. No other reports were offered at this time. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectme 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning Jan. 1, 1' } 
and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 17, Chapter 44, 
of the General Laws. Finance Committee approved. On a motion by Nicholas DeFelice it was voted to 
adopt the article as above. 

Article 4. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries of 
the several Town Offices, and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxatic 
transfer from available funds or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. On a motion by Mr. W. Cux 
it was voted that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance Committee be raised and 
appropriated for the purpose set forth in Article 4 of the Warrant. Each item to be taken up and voted on \ 
separately. Accordingly the following amounts were voted, | 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: Taxation 

Board of Selectmen, Two Thousand Two Hundred Dollar s $ 2,200.0( 

Elections, One Thousand Three Hundred Fifty Dollars 1,350,0( 

Registrars of Voters, Two Thousand Two Hundred Twenty-five Dollars 2,225.0( 

Finance Committee, Four Hundred Dollars 400. 0( • 

Town Manager, Thirteen Thousand Dollars 1 3, 000. 0( 

Industrial Account, One Thousand Dollars 1,000.0( 

Town Accountant, Seven Thousand Ninety-five Dollars 7,095.0( 

Town Treasurer, Five Thousand Two Hundred Forty-nine Dollars 5,249.0' 

Town Collector, Five Thousand Eight Hundred Twenty Dollars 5, 820. 0( 

Town Clerk, Three Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty-four Dollars 3,954. 0( ( 

Board of Assessors, Thirteen Thousand Dollars 1 3, 000. 0( , 

Town Counsel, Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 2, 500. 0( \ 

Town Hall, Fifteen Thousand Dollars 15,000.0( j 

Planning Board, Four Thousand Dollars 4, 000. 0( I 

TOTAL: GENERAL GOVERNMENT 76, 793. 0( 

PROTECTION, PERSONS AND PROPERTY: 

Police Dept. , Salaries, Sixty-nine Thousand Forty-four Dollars 69, 044. 0( 

Police Dept., Expenses, Six Thousand Eight Hundred Dollars 6, 800. 0( 

Fire Department, Salaries, Sixty-three Thousand One Hundred Fifty-four Dollars 63, 154. 0( 

Fire Dept., Expenses, Five Thousand Seven Hundred Forty-nine Dollars 5, 749. 0( 

Fire Dept. , Outlays, Two Thousand Five Hundred Fifty Dollars 2, 550. 0( 

Fire/Police Station, Five Thousand One Hundred Fifty Dollars 5, 150.0C|| 

Ambulance Account, Nine Hundred Dollars 900. OC | 

Civil Defense, Two Thousand Dollars 2, 000. DC ^ 

Constable, One Hundred Dollar s 100. OC 

Dog Officer, One Thousand Four Hundred Sixty Dollars 1,460.0C 

Building Inspector, Seven Thousand Four Hundred Twenty Dollars 7,420.0C 

Board of Appeals, Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 250. OC 

Sealer of Weights & Measures, Five Hundred Dollars 500. OC 

Gypsy Moth Control, Five Thousand Eight Hundred Dollars 5, 800. OC 
Tree Warden, Amended to read. Tree Warden Dept. , Seven Thousand Eight 

Hundred Fifty Dollars 7, 850. OC 

Dutch Elm Control, Six Thousand Eight Hundred Dollars 6, 800. OC 

Town Forest, One Hundred Fifty Dollars L^--2.^ 

TOTAL: PROTECTION, PERSONS & PROPERTY 1857677. OC 



92 



I 



PUBLIC WORKS: 

Town Engineer and Surveying, Eleven Thousand Dollars 

Highway Department Salaries, Thirty-two Thousand Dollars 
i Highway Department Expense s, Twenty-seven Thousand Dollars 
(Road Machinery Account, Eleven Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 

Chapter 90 Construction, Six Thousand Dollars 

Chapter 90 Maintenance, One Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 

Chapter 81 Maintenance, Eleven Thousand Dollars 

Snow and Ice Control, Sixteen Thousand Dollars 
i Public Street Lights, Fifteen Thousand Dollars 
tParks, Three Thousand Eight Hundred Dollars 

Cemeteries, Amendment by Mr. William P. Curtin, voted as follows: by taxation 

from the sale of Cemetery Lots $1,715.00 

TOTAL: PUBLIC WORKS 



Taxation 
$1 1, 000. 00 
32, 000. 00 
27, 000. 00 
11, 500. 00 
6, 000. 00 
1, 500. 00 
1 1, 000. 00 
16, 000. 00 
15, 000. 00 
3, 800. 00 
14, 453. 00 

149, 253. 00 



HEALTH &i SANITATION: 

Board of Health, Fourteen Thousand Six Hundred Sixty Dollars 
Garbage Collection, Nine Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Dollars 
Public Dump, Seven Thousand Dollars 
TOTAL: HEALTH & SANITATION 



14, 660. 00 
9, 450. 00 
7, 000. 00 

31, 110. 00 



CHARITIES VETERANS BENEFITS: 

Admin. Public Welfare, Six Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 
Assistance, Public Welfare, Eighty One Thousand Dollars 

Veterans Aid and Benefits, Sixteen Thousand Two Hundred Eighteen Dollars 
TOTAL: CHARITIES & VETERANS BENEFITS 

SCHOOLS: 



Salaries, Five Hundred Eighteen Thousand Two Hundred Thirty-two Dollars and 
f ninety-five cents 

Expenses, Voted to accept an amendment by Mr. Lynch to reduce the non-salary items 

from $99, 293. 00 to $80, 893. 00 
Capital Outlay, Two Thousand Two Hundred Dollars 

^Maintenance, One Hundred Fifteen Thousand Four Hundred Twenty-two Dollars 
Vocational Training, Seven Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 

TOTAL: SCHOOLS 

Estimated Receipts: 



6, 500. 00 
81, 000. 00 
16, 218. 
103, 718. 00 



518, 232. 95 

80, 893. 00 
2, 200. 00 
115, 422. 00 
7, 5 0. 00 
724, 247. 95 
(156, 657. 21) 



■i 

c 
E 



LIBRARY & RECREATION : 

Public Library, Eight Thousand Eight Hundred Fifty-nine Dollars 
Recreation Commission, Six Thousand Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 
TOTAL: LIBRARY & RECREATION 



8, 859. 00 
6, 250. 00 
15, 109. 00 



' UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE : 
Reserve Fund, Ten Thousand Dollars 
Insurance, Eighteen Thousand Dollars 

Training Conferences and Out-of-State Travel, Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
Tax Title & Legal Assistance, One Thousand Dollars 
Town Clock, One Hundred Dollars 

Town Report, Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 
TOTAL: UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 



10, 000. 00 
18, 000. 00 
750. 00 
1, 000. 00 
100. 00 
2, 500. 00 
32, 350. 00 



MATURING DEBT AND INTEREST : 

Principal, One Hundred Seventy-four Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 



174, 500. 00 



93 



MATURING DEBT AND INTER EST: (Continued) 

Interest & Fees, On a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber to raise by taxation $ 35,857.4( 

From Water Available Surplus Account $ 5,603.60 
To be transferred from available funds 30, 910. 00 
Accrued Interest from sale of Bonds 188.00 
Above amendment adopted $36, 701. 60 



TOTAL: MATURING DEBT & INTEREST $210, 357. 4t 

TOTAL BUDGET: $1,567, 031.9 

By Taxation $1,528,615.35 
By Transfer 38, 416. 60 

$1, 567, 031. 95 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars | 
($750.00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange 
and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee Approved $75i| 
The above article was made into a motion and so adopted. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable he 
quarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Board took no action. 



Motion by Mrs. Drew - I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate by taxation the sum of Seven 
Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of tl 
General Laws as amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purposi 
of providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion. The motion w 
adopted. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United State 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. This property is not being rented for 
school purposes. 

On a motion by Mr. Hagerty it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate $750. 00 for the above purpos 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, under the authority of ■ 
Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for V 
William F. Tattersal Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Massachusetl 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Board took no action. 

On a motion by Mr. Kidder it was voted to raise by taxation Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750. 00) and 
appropriate for the above purpose. 

At this point the Moderator stated that if no one objected he would not read each article since the motion h. 
the same meaning. No one objected. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred ($100.00) the mot r 
to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in co-operation with the Middlesex 
County Extension Service, under the provisions of Section 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws of Mass., : 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 4-H Town Committee. Finance Board approved $100.00. ( 
a motion by Nicholas DeFelice it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate $100, 00 for the above purp ^ 



94 



f 



Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to install street lights in the following Streets, or do anything in 
Finance Board approved. 



Adelman Road 


1 light 


Brand Avenue 


2 lights 


Carter Lane 


2 lights 


Dorothy Avenue 


3 lights 


Dunton Road 


2 lights 


Ferguson Road 


3 lights 


Kiernan Avenue 


3 lights 



On a motion by Mr, Black it was voted to install the above lights. 

Article 11. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee approved $2, 500. 00. 

On a motion by Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds, and appropriate the sum 
of $2, 500. 00 for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize the sale or 
turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department. 

Article 12. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Tree Department and authorize the sale or 
turn-in of a truck presently used by the Tree Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $4, 500. 00 On a motion by Mr. Hagerty it, was voted to 
raise by transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $4, 500. 00 for the above purpose. ' 



Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropri- 
ate a sum of money not to exceed Five Thousand Dollars ($5, 000. 00) for the purpose of oiling specified town 
public ways in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Selectmen, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee approved $1,500.00. 

On a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 1 , 500. 00 for the 
purpose of oiling the following named streets: Border Avenue, Broad Street, Cook Avenue, Highland Street, 
Massachusetts Avenue. 



1 3 



Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropri- > i] 
ate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee approved $450. 00. On a motion by Mr. Kidder it was voted to raise by taxation and Cj 

appropriate the sum of $384.40 for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years. Unanimous vote. 0)*' 



C 



Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to re-zone from Rural District to Single Residence Area, as defined 
in the Zoning By-Laws and shown on the Zoning Map, the land of Thomas C. Daly and Mary G. Daly situated 
m that part of Wilmington, known as North Wilmington and near the Andover town line, bounded and described 
as follows: - Southwesterly by Woburn Street, about 1630 ft. Northerly about 1338 ft. , Northeasterly 49. 3 ft. 
Northerly about 647. 20 ft. and easterly 489. 80 ft. by land now or formerly of Arthur W. Fames; Northerly 
by land now or formerly of New Fngland Power 725. 27 ft. Westerly by land now or formerly of Timothy 
Upton, about 627.91 ft. Southerly about 389 ft. and Westerly about 1475 ft. by land now or formerly of 
James A. Bancroft and land now or formerly of G. S. Marvin; Southerly by land now or formerly of Charles 
Feindel, about 1405 ft. and Southeasterly by said Feindel land, about 300 ft. also another lot bounded 
Westerly by Woburn Street, about 2675 ft. Northerly by land now or formerly of Tyler A. Stevens, 740. 05 ft 
Easterly 854. 11 ft. Northerly about 375 ft. Westerly about 195 ft. Northerly 129. 8 ft. Southwesterly 1023, 70 
ft. Northeasterly 55. 20 ft. Northerly 495 ft. and Easterly 196. 70 ft. all by land now or formerly of Irving F. 
Batchelder et al, and Southerly by land now or formerly of Abiel P. Pearson, about 1684 ft. Also another 




lot Northerly by Uptons Lane and land now or formerly of Charles L. Feindel, 101. 33 ft; Easterly by land 
now or formerly of Abiel P. Pearson 132.80 ft. Southerly by said Pear son' s land 119,01ft. Southwesterly 
by land now or formerly of Alfred Bookwalter 26. 20 ft. Northwesterly by land of said Feindel, 107. 74 ft. 
and Southwesterly by land of said Feindel, 1633 ft. On petition of Thomas C. Daly and others. Finance 
Board recommends that Planning Board report be accepted. 

Mr. Eaton made a motion which read as above. A great deal of discussion followed. The Planning Board 
gave a report as follows: The Planning Board wishes to report that it is not in favor of making the change 
in the Zoning By-Laws and map as requested in Article 15. This change is not only in direct contradiction 
to the purposes of the Zoning By-Law, but would add an additional financial burden to the townspeople for 
the following reasons: 

1. Since the nearest school is only four rooms and is 2 1/2 miles distance, additional school 
facilities would be required. 

2. The present water line on Andover Street is a 6" main. This would be entirely inadequate as 
a trunk line for the development in question and would require immediate replacement. 

3. Additional fire and police protection would be necessary. 

4. Andover Street which is the primary road to this development, would require improvement 
at considerable expense to the Town. 

The Planning Board feels that a change in the Zoning as proposed under this article could be 
disasterous to the present zoning by-laws since it would form a precedent under which all individual own< 
of land in zones requiring 60,000 sq. ft. could and no doubt would, apply for a change in the requirements 
for their particular land. This report was read by Mr. Tobey, Chairman of the Planning Board. Further 
discussion followed. A motion was made to close the discussion. Vote carried. . . Yes - 473. . . No - 1. 

The moderator put the question. In favor of rezoning Yes- 163 No - 308. The moderator declare 

the motion lost. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing Zoning By-Law of the Town by adding to 
Section III-4, A, 14, the following: "Oxygen, hydrogen or acetylene plant with maximum open storage area 
two acres for lime by-product of acetylene plant", or do anything in relation thereto. On petition of Simon 
Cutter and others. Finance Committee recommends that the Planning Board report be accepted. 

Since the article was one proposed by the Moderator, he stepped down and appointed in his place a former 
Moderator of the Town, Mr. David Elfman. Mr. Cutter's motion: - I move that the Town vote to amend t^ 
existing Zoning By-Law of the Town by adding to Section III-4, A, 14, the following: Oxygen, hydrogen or 
acetylene plant with maximum open storage area of two acres for Lirneby-product of acetylene plant. 
Mr. Black said the question is in litagation and should not be acted upon. On a motion by Mr. Babcock it 

was voted to table the article, A 2/3 vote was needed For - 346. . . .Against - 67. Article was tabled. 

A Planning Board report was given on the above article by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis before the vote was taken. 

On a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to recess until 7. 30 P. M. this evening. There were 563 voters at 
the afternoon session. 

At 7. 30 P.M. the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section IIIG of Chapter 49 of the General Laws in regari 
to Annual Vacations for certain employees of certain cities and town. On petition of Fred D. Cain and othe 
Finance Committee disapproved. Adequate vacations already provided. On a motion by Mr. Black it was 
voted to pass the article. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept IIIB of Chapter 41 of the General Laws in regard to sick 
leave for foremen, laborers, workmen, and mechanics or do anything in relation thereto. On petition of 
Fred D. Cain and others. Finance Committee disapproved the article. Sick leave already adequately 
provided. On a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to pass the article. 



96 



Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase or take by eminent 
domain for the purpose of off-street public parking, the parcel of land supposed to contain a little over two 
acres situated on Middlesex Avenue at the corner of Truman Road, a private way, and adjacent to the North 
Wilmington Railroad Station, and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and 
determine how much appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds by 
borrowing or otherwise or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Board recommends further study by 
Planning Board. 

Motion made by Mr. Tobey, chairman of the Planning Board - "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain for the purpose of off-street public parking, the parcel of 
land supposed to contain about one (1) acre situated on Middlesex Avenue at the corner of Truman Road, a 
private way, and adjacent to the North Wilmington Railroad Station, and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the north side of Middlesex Avenue two hundred and thirteen and seventeen hundredths 
(213. 17) feet from a stone bound and adjacent to the North Wilmington Railroad Station; thence ninety-four 
and ninety-one hundredths (94.91) feet north I'^OS' 20" west along the easterly boundary of land now or 
formerly of the Boston and Maine Railroad; thence seventy (70) feet south 75* 09' 53" west along the northerly 
boundary of said railroad land; thence two hundred sixteen and sixty-five hundredths (216. 65) feet north 
19°29' 30" west along the easterly boundary of the Boston and Maine Railroad; thence one hundred and sixty- 
nine and ninety-three hundredths (169.93) feet north 70° 30' 30" east along the southerly boundary of land now 
or formerly of Doris Weinstein; thence two hundred and eighty-two and seventy-three hundredths (282. 73) 
feet south 1<9'29' 30" east along the we ste rly boundary of a private way known as Truman Road; thence twenty- 
eight and fifty hundredths (28. 50) feet along a curve of radius of twenty (20) feet to the intersection of Truman 
Road and Middlesex Avenue; thence eighty-four and forty-nine hundredths (84. 49) feet along the northerly 
boundary of Middlesex Avenue to the point of beginning. All said land is shown on a plan entitled "North 
Wilmington Parking Lot in Wilmington, Massachusetts, August 1957" as revised February 1958 and filed in 
the office of the Town Clerk. And to raise and appropriate by taxation the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500. 00) for said purpose . A 2/3 vote is required For -271 Against - 31 Motion carried. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of Eminent 
Domain for a highway drainage, an easement over land of Elizabeth and Joseph Gray on Fames Street in 
the location as shown on a plan filed with the Town Clerk, and appropriate any sum of money therefor, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $50. 00. A motion was made by Mr. Black to 
pass over article 20 since the Gray family has given the Town permission for the easement. 

It was voted to take up Articles 33 through 38 at this time. 

Article 33. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of landscaping and otherwise improving the Town Common, and do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee approved $2,000.00. 

Mr. Tobey read a report from the Planning Board. On a motion by Mr. Hagerty it was voted to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 for the purpose of landscaping and otherwise improving the 
Town Common. It was so voted unanimsouly. 

Article 34 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriate a sum of money not to exceed Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) for the purpose of purchasing 
and installing on the Town Common a permanent Veterans Memorial and all appurtenances necessary thereto 
or do anything in relation thereto. The Finance Committee disapproved this article. 

Motion by Nicholas DeFelice - "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation the sum of Twenty-five 
Hundred Dollars ($2500.00) for the purpose of purchasing and installing on the Town Common a permanent 
Veterans Memorial. The motion was lost by a voice vote. 



97 



Article 35. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available fundi 
and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department, or do anything in relatioiij 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $4, 500. 00 from Road Machinery Funi 
On a motion by Mr. Kidder it was voted to transfer from the Road Machinery Fund Account for the above j 
purpose, and authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, the amount j 
of $4, 500. 00. J 

Article 36, To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available fund' 
and appropriate for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Town Engineer's Department, or do anything I 
in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $2, 100. 00. On a motion 
by Mrs. Drew it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $2, 100. 00 i 
for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Town Engineer's Department. Moderator asked for a voice 

vote. Seven people stood because they doubted the vote. A rising vote was taken Yes - 233. . . . No - 7 

The motion was adopted. 

Article 37. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funa 
and appropriate for the purchase of a rescue truck for the Civil Defense, or do anything in relation thereto. 1 
Request of the Civil Defense Director. Finance Committee approved $3, 000. 00. On a motion by 
Mrs. LaRivee it was voted to raise by transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 
for the purchase of a rescue truck for Civil Defense. i 

Article 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropria 
a sum of money not to exceed Thirty-eight Hundred Dollars ($3, 800. 00) for the purpose of purchasing and 
installing a control board for the town fire alarm signal telegraph system or take any action in relation ther 
Request of the Fire Chief. Finance Committee approved $ 3, 800. 00. On a motion by Mr. Boudreau it was 
voted to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $3,800.00 for the purpose as stated in the 

article. Mr. Sell's motion to reconsider Article 34 was lost. A standing vote was taken. . . . Yes - 93 

No - 236. 



The meeting now returned to Articles 21 through 32. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept the relocation of a portion of Roman Way as a Public Wa 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the 
office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of Eminent Domain such I 
land, slope and drainage and other easements as maybe necessary to effect said acceptance and relocation, | 
and to see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, or oth ■ 
wise or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $50.00. j 

On a motion by Nicholas DeFelice it was voted to accept the relocation of Roman Way as a Public Town Way 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the 
office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of Eminent Domain such 1; 
slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect said acceptance and relocation, and f 
this purpose the sum of $50.00 is hereby raised by taxation and appropriated. The vote was unanimously in 
favor of this article. j 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept the relocation of a portion of West Street as a Public Toil 
Way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed withl 
the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of Eminent Domain su( | 
land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect said acceptance and relocation 
and to see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, or otl 
wise, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved $50.00. On a motion by Mrs. Drev 
it was unanimously voted to accept the relocation of West Street as a Public Town Way as stated in the artic 
above and for this purpose the svim of $50.00 is hereby raised and appropriated. 



98 



Lrticle 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
'ater mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified streets in accordance 

ith the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 332, 
f the Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer 

cm available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the 
card of Water Commissioners. Finance Committee approved a Bond Issue. • 

in a motion made by Mr. Melzar that the Town vote to appropriate and raise by borrowing the sum of Fifty 
housand Dollars ($50, 000. 00) for the purpose of laying water mains of not less than six inches, but less 
an sixteen inches in diameter under the provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955 for certain distances 
n the following streets: 

Shawsheen Avenue Clifton Street 

Nichols Street Chestnut Street 

ud/or in such other street as may be decided by the Board of Water Commissioners, and to meet such 
ppropriation that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in not more than fifteen years. 

fter much discussion an amendment was offered which read "To delete Nichols Street from those streets 
'ider consideration for the laying of water mains under the provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955. 

his amendment was voted unanimously. The moderator put the Main Motion, striking out Nichols Street 
lat leaving the same amount of money to be raised by borrowing. The main motion was so voted unanimously. 



rticle 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Wing Road as approved by 
e Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
etterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned, 
hereby referred to for more particular description; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
nether by taxation, or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
)nstructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease- 
ents therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee - Bond Issue. 

n a motion by Nicholas DeFelice it was voted unanimously to raise and hereby appropriate the sum of 
5,000.00 as follows: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
le sum of $5, 000. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within ten years, as stated in 
e above article, for which this money is raised. 



ft? 
:;i 



rticle s 2 5, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of the 



llowing: - Kiernan Avenue, Oakridge Circle, Marcus Road, Walker Street, Shady Lane Drive, Dell Drive, 
atricia Circle as approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under provisions of law re - 

ting to the assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk; and which, 
lith plans therein mentioned, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to determine how 

appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
iherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the 
king of land and slope easements and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto, 
•tides 25 through 31 approved by the Finance Board - Bond Issue. 



he moderator would not permit a motion that included all the streets in question in one motion. Fach street 
IS taken up with a single motion and voted upon separately. On a motion by Nicholas DeFelice it was voted 
animously on Articles 2 5 through and including 31 to raise and hereby appropriate the sum of $4500 for 
Lernan Avenue, the sum of $18, 000 for Oakridge Circle, the sum of $18, 000 for Marcus Road, the sum of 
,500 for Walker Street, the sum of $5,000 for Shady Lane Drive, and the sum of $4,000 for Dell Drive, 
d the sum of $3,000 for Patricia Circle, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within 
1 years, for the streets named in the above article. 



rticle 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct Fairmeadow Road as a Public Town Way 



laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office 



99 



of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the Right of Eminent Domain such lane 
slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the article and to see h' 
much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how such appropriation shall be rais 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relat 
thereto. Finance Committee approved $ 18, 000. 00. 

On a motion made by Mr. Black it was voted unanimously that the Town accept and construct as a public wa 
Fairmeadow Road as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning 
Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and authorize the Board of Selectmen to ta 
bythe right of eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as maybe necessary to 
effect said purpose and for said purposes that there be raised by taxation and appropriated the sum of 
$18, 000. 00. 



Mr. Nicholas DeFelice read two resolves: 



To Mr. Herbert C, Barrows, Chairman of the Finance Committee - 
This is the first Annual Town Meeting ever missed by Mr. Herbert C. Barrows, 
Chairman of our Finance Committee, in sixty-three (63) years of continuous 
service as a faithful servant of our Town. We miss him and his sincere counsel - 
We resolve that the Town Clerk write him of our feelings. 

To Mr. Joseph F. Courtney, Town Manager - 

As you know our Town Manager Mr. Joseph F. Courtney has resigned - this 
will be his last Town Meeting as our Town Manager; therefore be it resolved 
that we wish him Godspeed and express our appreciation of his leadership 

during these past years of service. f |i 

Mr. Nicholas DeFelice read a letter from Edward C. Wilson, Department of Corporations and Taxation. 
The letter outlines the improvements in Wilmington during Mr. Courtney's term of office. This letter is o 
file in the Town Clerk's office. 



Article 39. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available func 
and appropriate for the purchase of a 75 -foot Aerial Ladder Truck and all necessary equipment for the use 
of the Fire Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Fire Chief. Finance Committe' 
disapproved this article. 



Motion by Mr. Boudreau, Fire Chief - I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the 
sum of $38,000.00 for the purchase of a 75-foot aerial ladder truck and all necessary equipment for the us 
of the Fire Department. The moderator asked for a voice vote. The vote was questioned by seven voters 
A standing vote was taken In Favor - 222 Opposed - 129. The motion was adopted. 

Article 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation by transfer from available funds, by borrow 
or otherwise, the sum of Seventy-five Thousand Dollars ($75,000.00) and appropriate same for the purposi 
of acquiring a site and constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a New Police Station, or do any, 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Chief of Police. Referred to Permanent Building Committee b" 
the Finance Committee. 

Motion by Mr. Paul J. Lynch, Chief of Police - I move that the Town vote to raise by borrowing, the sum I 
Seventy-five Thousand Dollars ($75,000.00) and appropriate same for the purpose of acquiring a site and 
constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a New Police Station. After much discussion 
Mr. Tautges moved that Article 41 be taken up first before any action was taken on Article 40 since any ne 
building would be referred to a Permanent Building Committee; which committee article 41 describes. 
Voted unanimously. 



100 



Article 41, To see if the Town will vote to establish a permanent building committee to have charge of all 
lew building construction for the Town, including schools, determine how the members of such committee 
shall be selected or appointed and their powers and terms of office or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee approved. 

Vlotion by Mr. Kidder - "I move that there is hereby established a permanent building committee to have 
:harge of all new building construction for the Town, including schools; such committee to consist of five 
nembers to be appointed by the Selectmen and Town Manager in the first instance for three years or shorter 
arms but eventually for three year terms in such manner that the terms of not more than two members will 
|!xpire in any one year, and all vacancies through death, resignation or otherwise as well as by expiration 
Df term to be filled in like manner by the Selectmen and Town Manager. " 

[n addition to the regular members of the committee, the following official agencies of the Town; namely, 
:he Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board and Town Manager shall each have the right to designate 
rom time to time an advisory, non-voting member who shall have the right to participate in all meetings and 
)btain copies of all records, and the School Committee and Superintendent of Schools shall likewise have the 
right to designate one advisory non-voting member, each with like powers whenever school building con- 
struction is involved. A voice vote was unanimously in favor of the motion. 

Returning to Article 40 - The Selectmen offered to make another motion for a lesser amount for the Police 
Station if the first motion was withdrawn. Mr. Lynch withdrew his motion. MOTION by Mr. DeFelice - >^ 
Moved that the Town for the purpose of acquiring the site hereinafter described and of constructing thereon S 
tnd originally equipping and furnishing a new Police Station, there is hereby appropriated the sum, not to J 
jxceed $65, 000. 00 - $5, 000. 00 of said amount to be raised by taxation, to meet the balance of said approp- -I ( 

riation, that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow the j| 
■.um of $60, 000. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable in not more than ten years, ' j 

3ursuant to authority granted by the Emergency Finance Board under the provisions of General Law, Chap. ; < 

14, Section 10 as amended; the site to be acquired comprising lots numbered 1, 2, 7-13 inclusive, and Ij 
|ll45-147 inclusive on the Hiller Plan, so called, now assessed to Mabel Holt, and the acquisition of the site, 
:he making of the necessary contracts, and the expenditure of said appropriation to be in charge of the new :;| 
Permanent Building Committee. A lengthy discussion followed. A motion was made to close discussion. : J 

'^oted unanimously. The moderator put the question. The above motion was voted unanimously in favor and ; 
30 adopted. : 

Article 42. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the Permanent Building Committee, when appointed, ' 
ill powers duties and functions previously delegated to the elementary school building committee with respect 
o the proposed elementary school off Glen Road and all powers, duties and functions previously delegated to 
he committee on additional school accommodations or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
.pproved. The Moderator received a letter of resignation from the Elementary School Building Committee. 
At. Hagerty moved the adoption of the above article. Motion was voted unanimously. 

\rticle 43. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Permanent Building Committee to provide for not 
nore than twelve classrooms in the proposed elementary school off Glen Road and 1 imit the total amount 
o be expended therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. 

VIOTION - Mr. Nicholas DeFelice - I move that the Town instruct the Permanent Building Committee to 
irovide for not more than twelve classrooms in the proposed elementary school off Glen Road, and that the 
otal amount to be expended therefor, including architect's fees and all other costs shall not exceed Four 
lundred Thousand Dollars ($400, 000. 00). Motion voted unanimously in favor. 

vlr. Kane moved that the meeting reconsider Article 15. This was lost by a voice vote. 

\rticle 44. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 136, Section 4-B of the General Laws, or do 
nything in relation thereto. On petition of Constance Magee and others. Finance Committee disapproved 
he article. Do not want to commercialize Sunday any further. 



101 



MOTION made by Mr. Wesley H. Baker, 1 move that the Town vote to accept Chapter 136, Section 4-B o: 
the General Laws. Since this motion r efers to Sunday Bowling, Reverend Harding spoke against it. Thj 
Moderator put the question, and the vote was unanimously in favor of the motion. 



3 



A motion was made to adjourn. Meeting adjourned at 10.40 P.M. 
evening meeting. 



Total voted: 



By Taxation 
By Transfer 
By Bond 



$1, 597, 199. 75 
58, 816. 60 
170, OOP. 00 
$1, 826, 016. 35 



There were 457 voters present at the 



A true copy: 
Atte st: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - June 9, 1958 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Harry J. Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by lav 
to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium, Church Street, on 
Monday the Ninth Day of June next at 8. 00 P.M. , to consider and act on the following Articles - 

The meeting was called to order at 8.24 P.M. by the Moderator. Mr. Cutter began the reading of the 
Warrant. On a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town by adding a new Section 33A ir 

Chapter 5, reading as follows: 

The owners of land which has been excavated are hereby required to erect barriers or take oth< 
suitable measures within five (5) days after such owners have been notified in writing by the 
Selectmen that in their opinion such excavation constitutes a hazard to public safety. 
The penalty for violation of this Section shall be $20. 00 for each day such violation continues, 
but not to exceed a total of $200. 00 or do anything in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee approved article. 

MOTION: by Mr. Donald C. Kidder - Moved that the town vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town by addi' 
a new section, following Section 33 of Chapter 5, to be known as Section 33A of Chapter 5, reading as foil 
The owners of land which has been excavated are hereby required to erect barriers or take othi 
suitable measures within five (5) days after such owners have been notified in writing by the 
Selectmen that in their opinion such excavation constitutes a hazard to public safety. 

The penalty for violation of this section shall be $20. 00 for each day such violation continues, 
but shall not exceed a total of $200. 00. Motion was so voted unanimously. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 427, Acts of 1957 or do anythi 
in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved article. 

MOTION: by Mrs. Drew - I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 427, Acts of 195' 
Motion was so voted unanimously. 



102 



article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to purchase 
the use of the Department, using the receipts of the Department to the extent necessary for such 
r do anything in relation thereto. Finance Board approved article. 



a truck 
payment, 



lOTION:. by Nicholas L. DeFelice - Moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners 
D purchase a truck for the use of the Department, in an amount not to exceed $2700. and that the receipts of 
le Department be used therefor. After some discussion a motion was made to table the article. This 

equired a standing vote Yes - 10 No - 161 Motion was' lost. The main motion was voted 

lanimously. 

.rticle 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to lay water mains 

not less than six inches, but less than sixteen inches in diameter on Nichols Street in addition to the streets 
jecified for such installations in the vote of the Town taken under Article 23 of the Warrant at the Annual 
own Meeting in March, 1958 and to use such portion of the appropriation made under said Article as may be 
ecessary for such purpose, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved article. 



lOTION: by Mr. Francis J. Hagerty - Moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Water Commiss- 
ners to lay water mains on Nichols Street in addition to the streets specified for such installation in the vote 
nder Article 23 of the Annual Town Meeting in March 1958. There was more than an hour given to discuss - 

n. The question was called for which closed further arguments Yes - 203 No - 0. . . . declared 

lanimous. The main motion was put Yes - 104 No - 97 motion declared passed. 



lotion to adjourn. Adjourned at 9. 50 P.M. There were 237 registered voters present. 



] true copy: 
ttest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



STATE PRIMARY ELECTION September 9, 1958 HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 

CHURCH STREET, WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



if 

-'J 



O: Harry J Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington 

REETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby required to notify and warn 
e' inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Cafeteria, 
hurch Street, Tuesday the ninth day of September, 1958 at 3.45 o'clock P.M. for the following purposes: 

o bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
)llowing offices: 



Senator in Congress 
Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 
Secretary of the Commonwealth 
Treasurer and Receiver -General 
Auditor of the Commonwealth 
Attorney General 
Representative in Congress 
Councillor 
Senator 

2 - Representatives in General Court 
District Attorney 



for this Commonwealth 

for this Commonwealth 

for this Commonwealth 

for this Commonwealth 

for this Commonwealth 

for this Commonwealth 

for this Commonwealth 

for 5th Congressional District 

for 6th Councillor District 

for 7th Senatorial District 

for 18th Representative District 

for Northern District 



103 



Clerk of Courts 

Register of Deeds 

County Commissioner 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

The polls will be open from 4. 00 P. M. to 8. 00 P. M. 



for Middlesex County 
for Northern District 
for Middlesex County 
for Middlesex County 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this Day of August, A. D. 1958. 

(Signed) 



Francis J. Hagerty 
Charles H. Black 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Wavie M. Drew 
Donald C. Kidder 



Board of 
Sele ctmen 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



Constable 



Middlesex S S August 26, 1958 

I this day posted copies of the within Warrant in accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington. 

(Signed) Harry J. Ainsworth 

Constable of Wilmington 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



In accordance with the foregoing warrant the meeting was called to order by the Warden, Francis Hagerty 
at 3. 50 P. M. On a motion by Robert H. Peters it was voted to dispense with further reading of the War n 
The polls were declared open at 4. 00 P. M. The ballot box was examined by the Warden, Town Clerk anc 
Police Officer. It was found to be empty and registered 0000. The keys were delivered to the Police 
Officer and all Election Officers were sworn in to the faithful performance of their duty, and the ballot s 
were delivered to the clerks. 



The polls were declared closed at 
box and caused it to register 795. 
as announced by the Warden, 



. 00 P. M. The ballot box registered 795. One ballot jammed the ball 
There were 794 ballots cast. Following is the result of the election 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Senator in Congress: 
Vincent J. Celeste, 
Alan E. Fenton 
Blanks, 

Gove rnor 
George Fingold 
Charles Gibbons 
Joseph P. McKay 
Alan E. Fenton 
John A. Volpe 
Blanks 
All others 



289 
1 

86 
376 

12 
320 
1 
1 
3 
38 
1 

T76 



Senator in Congress: 
John F. Kennedy 
Blanks 



Governor 
Foster Furcolo 
Charles Gibbons 
Blanks 



364 
54 

418 

374 
6 
38 
418 



104 



Lieutenant Governor: 
Elmer C. Nelson 
Alan E. Fenton 
Charles Gibbons 
Blanks 

Secretary: 

Marion Curran Boch 
Charles Gibbons 
Blanks 

Treasurer : 



Lieutenant Governor: 



John E. Yerxa 
Blanks 



Auditor: 

Thomas H. Adams 
Blanks 

Attorney General: 
Christian A. Herter, Jr. 
Blanks 



Congre s sman 

Edith Nourse Rogers 

Blanks 



Councillor 

O. Edward Dutile 

John P. Forte 

H. Bradford Green, Jr. 

T. Peter Russo 

William A. Warren 

Blanks 

Senator : 

Charles Gibbons 
Alan E. Fenton 
Edward D. Conway 
Blanks 
All others 

Representatives in General Court: 
Frank D. Tanner 
Lester W. Bowen 
Arthur James West, II 
Alan E. Fenton 
Blanks 



336 
2 
1 

37 
376 

330 
1 

45 
376 

325 
51 
376 



32 3 
53 
376 

347 
29 
376 



349 
27 
376 



72 
142 
45 
16 
40 
61 
376 

226 
15 
5 

129 

l_ 

376 

298 
1 12 
256 
2 
84 
752 



Robert F. 
Blanks 



Murphy 



Secretary: 
Edward J. Cronin 
Blanks 



Treasurer: 



William G. Shaughnessy 
John F. Kennedy 
Blanks 



Auditor: 
Thomas J. 
Blanks 



Buckley 



Attorney General: 

Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 

Endicott Peabody 

Charles Gibbons 

Blanks 

Congre ssman 
William H. Sullivan 
Blanks 



Councillor 

Joseph Ray Crimmins 
Michael Luongo 
Blanks 



Senator: 

Vincent B. Lantagne 
William C. Madden 
Arthur E. McGlinchey 
Blanks 
All others 

Representatives in General Court: 
Thomas F. Donohue 
Malcolm MacRae 
Blanks 



390 
28 
418 



377 
41 
418 



286 
119 
13 
418 

376 
42 

418 

185 
221 
1 
11 
418 

369 
49 
418 



297 
81 
40 

418 



72 
218 
98 
29 

1^ 

418 

362 
250 
224 
836 



j 

H 

_ 5 
i)5 



105 



District Attorney: 
William G. Andrew 
James F. Mahan 
Alan E. Fenton 
Blanks 



275 
47 
1 

53 
376 



District Attorney: 
James L, O'Dea, Jr. 
Andrew T. Trodden 
Blanks 



303 
106 

9 

418 



Clerk of Courts: 

Charles T, Hughes 322 
Alan E. Fenton 1 
Blanks 53 

376 



Clerk of Courts: 

Thomas F. August 4 

Edward T. Brady 26 

T. Edward Corbett 15 

William T. Desmond 34 

Philip P. Dever 24 

John J. Fitzpatrick 39 • 

Angus M. MacNeil 9 

Harold W. McKelvey 192 

Edward J. Sullivan 43 

Charles Gibbons 1 

Blanks 26 

All others 5 



418 



Register of Deeds: 

John Janas 313 
Blanks 63 

376 



Register of Deeds: 

Frederick J. Finnegan 375 
Blanks 43 

418 



County Commissioner: County Commissioner: 

John F. Cahill 83 Thomas B. Brennan 138 

Frederick Lowe 134 John D. Buckley 34 

Jesse A, Rogers 94 Lawrence A. Buckley 5 

Blanks 65 John Joseph Burke 23 

376 Edmund R. Campbell 5 

Gilbert E. Cardoso 14 

Raymond E. Ennis 10 

Arthur G. Gendreau 18 

Lawrence P. Masterson 6 

Joseph Sarcia 3 

John L. Sullivan 18 

Armand R. Valentino 10 

David I. Walsh 83 

Blanks 51 



418 



Register of Probate and Insolvency: 




Register of Probate and Insolvency: 




Winston W. Bell 


145 


John V. Harvey 


147 


Warren J. Fitzgerald 


176 


Lawrence H. Avery 


20 


Blanks 


55 


George H. Bailey 


6 




376 


Vincent J. Brown 


9 






C. Michael Bradley 


9 






Patrick J, Brennan 


29 






John Fred Buckley 


17 






John B. Carr 


17 






Timothy J. Cosgrove 


12 






Edward J. Crane 


5 



106 



Due to the untimely death of Attorney General, 
George Fingold; pasters had to be used. 



Register of Probate and Insolvency (continued) 
TinnothyF. O'Connor 23 
Francis J. O'Dea 36 
John L. Sullivan 30 
Blanks 58 

418 



Total: Republican voters, Three Hundred Seventy-six 
Total votes - 794 



Total: Democratic voters, Four Hundred Eighteen 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - Sept. 15, 1958 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Harry J. Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Monday, the Fifteenth Day 
of September next at 8. 00 P.M. to consider and act on the following Article: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to set the total expenditures under the vote passed August 8, 1957 
under Article 17 providing for a new elementary school off Glen Road, and to approve the issue of bonds 
thereunder, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a Certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this 3d day of September, A. D. One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Fifty-eight. 



Middlesex SS 



(Signed) Francis J. Hagerty ) 

Charles H. Black ) 

Wavie M, Drew ) 

Donald C. Kidder ) 

September 5, 1958 



Board of 
Selectmen 



I this day posted attested copies of the above Warrant in accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of 
Wilmington. 

(Signed) John Imbimbo 

Constable of Wilmington 

Proceedings of the above Special Town Meeting. 

In accordance with the foregoing Warrant, the voters assembled at the Herbert Barrows Auditorium on the 
above date. The meeting was called to order by Mr, Simon Cutter, Moderator at 8,20 P.M. Mr. Cutter 
stated that since it was his Religious holiday he appeared only for the express purpose of appointing a 
Moderator for this meeting. Mr. Philip B. Buzzell was appointed Moderator and immediately took the chair. 



3 

ii' 

: > 

5 5 
i d 

5 

: :i 

»5! 



107 



Mr. Buzzell read the Warrant, and called for a motion on the Article. 

MOTION: Made by Mr. Hanke, Chairman of the Permanent Building Committee, I move the limit of $400,00 
imposed by vote of the Town at the annual meeting in March, 1958 under Article 43 of the warrant for said 
meeting upon the total amount to be expended for the proposed elementary school off Glen Road be and the 
same is hereby increased to $450, 000; and the issue of bonds therefor under authority of the vote passed at 
the special meeting held August 8, 1957 under Article 17 of the Warrant for said meeting and the appropriati 
of the proceeds therefor for said purpose be and the same are hereby ratified, approved and confirmed. 

The Finance Committee recommends the sum of $450,000.00 for the purpose set forth in the article by 

bond issue. 

MOTION TO AMEND: Made by Mr. Joha J. Collins, Superintendent of Schools, - "That the motion before 
the house be amended by substituting the amount of $472, 000. in lieu of $450, 000. 00, and that the in- 
structions imposed by vote of the Town under said Article 43 of the Annual Town Meeting of March, 1958 be 
clarified by thr; statement that said school be of conventional design." 

The Permanent Building Committee reports were allowed by the Moderator in the course of discussion on the 
amendment. Each member of this committee gave a report on a different phase of the construction of the 
proposed school. Nearly two hours of discussion followed. 

s 

f The Moderator called for a voice vote on the amendment. Seven people rose and questioned the vote. A 
'■ standing vote was taken. In Favor of Amendment - 107 Opposed - 116. The amendment was lost. 

The Main Motion was then put before the voters. A standing vote was taken Yes - 193 No - 1. 

The Motion was adopted. j 

A motion to adjourn was called for. Meeting adjourned at 10. 15 P.M. 
There were Z37 voters present at the meeting. 

A true copy: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR STATE ELECTION - November 4, 1958 
TO: Harry J. Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to 
vote, to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the Fourth Day of November next at 
5. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be open at 6. 00 A. M. , and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. for the 
election of the following: Senator in Congress, Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, 
Auditor, Attorney General, Congressman, Councillor, Senator, two Representatives in General Court, 
District Attorney, Clerk of Courts, Register of Deeds, County Commissioners, Register of Probate and In- 
solvency and vote YES or NO on the following Questions: 



QUESTION NO. 1 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below which was disapproved in the House of Representatives by a vote 
of 73 in the affirmative and 132 in the negative and was approved in the Senate by a vote of 2 1 in the affirm- 
ative and 17 in the negative? YES 

NO 



108 



SUMMARY: The proposed measure provides that every former public employee, other than a judge, who is 
pensioned or retired for disability, shall report to his retirement authority, annually, his earnings from 
gainful occupation during the preceding year; and that, if such earnings, plus the pension, exceed the regular 
compensation of the position formerly held, the pensioner shall refund that portion of his pension equal to 
such excess or the entire pension if such excess is greater than the pension. A refund, if required, shall 
not include any part of a pension represented by salary deductions from or a special purchase by the former 
employee. The requirement of a refund is not applicable to income received in or prior to 1958. 

QUESTION NO. 2 

A. Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whiskey, rum, gin, 
malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? YES NO 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages (wines and beer, 
ale and all other malt beverages)? YES NO 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this Town for the sale therein all alcoholic beverages in packages, so called, 
not to be drunk on the premises? YES NO 

QUESTION NO. 3 

A. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed horse races be permitted in this county? YES NO 

B. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed dog races be permitted in this county? YES NO 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant; or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon to 
the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this day of October, A. D. One Thousand Nine Hundred and 

Fifty-eight. 

(Signed) Francis J. Hagerty ) 

Charles H. Black ) 
Nicholas L. DeFelice ) Board of 

Wavie M. Drew ) Selectmen 

Donald C. Kidder ) 

Middlesex SS October 24, 1958 

I this day posted attested copies of the within Warrant in accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of 
Wilmington. 

(Signed) Harry J. Ainsworth 

Constable of Wilmington 

In accordance with the foregoing Warrant the meeting was called to order by the Warden, Francis J. Hagerty, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, at 5.45 A.M. Mr. Hagerty begain the reading of the Warrant at which 
time Mr. Biggar moved to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. The ballot box was opened in the 
presence of the Warden, Town Clerk and Police Officer and found to be empty, the register indicated OOOO. 
The ballot box was then locked and the keys given to the police officer. 

The election officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the Town Clerk. The ballots 
were delivered to the tellers and a receipt for all ballots was signed by Mr. Hagerty and given to the Town 
Clerk. 

The Polls were declared open at 6.00 A.M. All of the ballots cast were sorted, counted, recorded and 
declaration thereof made, as by law is directed, and were for the following, namely: 

109 



Senator in Congress: 

John F, Kennedy, Two Thousand Four Hundred Seventy-four 2474 

Vincent J. Celeste, One Thousand Sixty-seven 1067 

Lawrence Gilfedder, Nine 9 

Mark R. Shaw, Thirteen 13 

Blanks, Sixty-nine 69 

36T2 

Governor: 

Foster Furcolo, One Thousand Fight Hundred Forty-five 1845 

Charles Gibbons, One Thousand Seven Hundred Seventeen 1717 

Henning A. Blomen, Fourteen 14 

Guy S. Williams, Eleven 11 

Blanks, Forty-four 44 

Others 1_ 

3632 

Lieutenant Governor: 

Robert F. Murphy, One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-nine 1999 

Elmer C. Nelson, One Thousand Five Hundred Fifty 1550 

Harold E. Bassett, Eighteen 18 

Francis A. Votano, Seventeen 17 

Blanks, Forty-eight 48 

3632 



2070 
1464 
10 
11 

77 

3632 
Treasurer: 



John F. Kennedy, Two Thousand Sixty-two 2062 
John E. Yerxa, One Thousand Four Hundred Eighty-two 1482 
Warren C. Carberg, Fourteen 14 
John Erlandsson, Eight 8 
Blanks, Sixty-six 66 

3632 

Auditor: 

Thomas J. Buckley, Two Thousand One Hundred forty-three 2143 
Thomas H. Adams, One Thousand Three Hundred Eighty-nine 1389 
John B. Lauder, Eleven 11 
Arne A. Sortell, Nine 9 

Blanks, Eighty 80 

3632 

Attorney General: 

Christian A. Herter, Jr. , One Thousand Eight Hundred Forty-eight 1848 
Edward J, McCormack, Jr. , One Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty-nine 1729 
Charles A. Couper, Seven 7 
Gustaf B. Nissen, Four 4 
Blanks, Forty-four 44 

3632 

Congre ssman: 

Edith Nourse Rogers, Two Thousand Five Hundred Fourteen 2514 
William H. Sullivan, One Thousand Seventy-seven 1077 
Blanks, Forty-one 41 

3632 



Secretary: 

Edward J. Cronin, Two Thousand Seventy 

Marion Curran Boch, One Thousand Four Hundred Sixty-four 
Fred M. IngersoU, Ten 
Julia B. Kohler, Eleven 
Blanks, Seventy-seven 



110 



Councillor: 



Joseph Ray Crimmins, One Thousand Nine Hundred Eighty-One 


1981 


John P. Forte, One Thousand Five Hundred Forty-four 


1544 


Blanks, One Hundred Seven 


107 




3632 


Senator : 




William C. Madden, One Thousand Nine Hundred Twenty-nine 


1929 


William E. Maloney, One Thousand Five Hundred Ninety 


1590 


Blanks, One Hundred Thirteen 


113 




3632 


Representatives in General Court: 




Thomas F. Donohue, One Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty-two 


1952 


Frank D Tanner, One Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty-five 


1725 


Malcolj^n MacRae, One Thousand One Hundred Ninety-eight 


1198 


Arthur James West, One Thousand Three Hundred Eighty-one 


1381 


Blanks, One Thousand Eight 


1008 




7264 


District Attorney: 




James L. O'Dea, Jr., Two Thousand Twenty-nine 


2029 


William G. Andrew, One Thousand Five Hundred Thirteen 


1513 


Blanks, Ninety 


90 




3632 


Clerk of Courts: 




Charles T. Hughes, One Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty- seven 


1727 


Edward J. Sullivan, One Thousand Eight Hundred Eleven 


1811 


Blanks, Ninety-four 


94 




3632 


Register of Deeds: 




Frederick J, Finnegan, Two Thousand Sixty-nine 


2069 


John Janas, One Thousand Four Hundred Fifty-five 


1455 


Blanks, One Hundred Eight 


108 




3632 


County Commissioner: 




Thomas B. Brennan, One Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty-eight 


1968 


John F. Cahill, One Thousand Five Hundred Thirty-nine 


15 39 


Blanks, One Hundred Twenty-five 


125 




3632 


Register of Probate and Insolvency: 




Warren J. Fitzgerald, One Thousand Seven Hundred Nineteen 


1719 


John V. Harvey, One Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty-four 


1764 


Blanks, One Hundred Forty-nine 


149 




3632 


Question No. 1 




Law Proposed by Initiative Petition: 




Do you approve a law siimmarized below which was disapproved in 


the House of Representatives by a vote 



of 73 in the affirmative and 132 in the negative and was approved in the Senate by a vote of 2 1 in the affirma- 
tive and 17 in the negative. 



Yes, Two Thousand Ninety-nine 2099 

I No, Nine Hundred Ninety-two 992 

Blanks, Five Hundred Forty-one 541 

I 3632 



111 



Question No. 2 

A. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whiskey, 
rum, gin, malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? 



Yes, Eight Hundred Forty-four 844 
No, Two Thousand Three Hundred Sixty-seven 2 367 

Blanks, Four Hundred Twenty-One 421 

36 32 

Question No. 2 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages (wines 
and beer, ale and all other malt beverages) ? 

Yes, Eight Hundred Three 803 
No, Two Thousand Two Hundred Eighty-one 2281 
Blanks, Five Hundred Forty-eight 548 

3632 

Question No. 2 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages 
so called, not to be drunk on the premises? 

Yes, Two Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-two 2652 
No, Six Hundred Ninety-seven 697 
Blanks, Two Hundred Eighty-three 283 



3632 



Question No. 3 

A. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed horse races be permitted in this county? 



Yes, One Thousand Five Hundred Thirty-seven 1537 
No, One Thousand Eight Hundred Nine 1809 
Blanks, Two Hundred Eighty-six 286 

3632 

B. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed dog races be permitted in this county? 

Yes, One Thousand Four Hundred Twenty-two 1422 
No, One Thousand Eight Hundred Twenty-nine 1829 
Blanks, Three Hundred Eighty-one 381 

3632 

There were twenty-seven (27) Absentee Ballots cast. There were Three Thousand Six Hundred Thirty-two 
names checked on the voting list. The ballot box read Three Thousand Six Hundred Thirty-three (3633). 
One ballot jammed the box and the bell rang twice. 

After the declaration of the vote the meeting was dissolved at 3. 30 A.M. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



1 12 






WARRANT - ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



TO: Harry J, Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington. 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the - 



at 9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 A, M. , and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. , for 
the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named Offices, to wit: Two 
Selectmen for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
one Moderator for the term of one year; one Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of 
three years (to fill an unexpired term) and vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION 1. Shall the acceptance by the Town of Wilmington of the act passed by the General Court in the 
year nineteen hundred and fifty, entitled "An Act establishing a Town Manager form of government for the 
Town of Wilmington" be revoked? YES NO 

QUESTION 2. Shall the Town of Wilmington accept the provisions of Chapter Thirty-two B of the General 
Laws, authorizing any county, city, town or district to provide a plan of group life insurance, group acciden- 
tal death and dismemberment insurance, and group general or blanket hospital, surgical and medical insur- 
ance for certain persons in the service of such county, city, town or district and their dependents, a fair, 
concise sximmary and purpose of which appears below? 

This chapter authorizes the provision by any town which accepts the same by vote of a majority of the 
voters voting on the question, of group life insurance, group accidental death and dismemberment in- 
surance, and group general or blanket hospital, surgical and medical insurance, for certain persons in 
the service of the town and their dependents. The employees to be covered include those employed, 
appointed, or elected by popular vote provided a substantial part of the person's total time is devoted to 
' the service of the town during the regular work week. 

If the chapter is accepted, it will become mandatory upon the selectmen to arrange for such insurance, 
half the premiums therefor to be paid for by the town and the other half by withholding from the salary 
or wages of the employees. The amount of life insurance and accidental death and dismemberment in- 
surance on each employee would be two thousand dollars. YES NO 

QUESTION 3. Shall the fluoridation of the water supply of the Town of Wilmington be continued? 

If a majority of the votes in answer to said question is in the affirmative, the fluoridation of the water 
supply of said Town shall be continued, otherwise it shall be discontinued. YES NO 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of Wil- 
mington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assenible subsequently and meet in 
Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington. 



HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 
Saturday, the 7th Day of March, A.D. 1959 



on 



Saturday, the 14th Day of March, A.D. 1959 



at 1. 30 P. M. , then and there to act on the following articles: 



t 



113 



ARTICLE 2, To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

ARTICLE 3, To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1959 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 17 
Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 4. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries 
of the several Town Offices, and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750.00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange 
and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
the re to. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 8, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, under the authority of 
Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in co-operation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Section 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws of 
Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Wilmington 4-H Town Committee. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to install street lights in the following streets; Auburn Avenue - 
3 lights, Catherine Avenue - 2 lights, Christine Drive - 1 light, Concord Street - 1 light, Dell Drive - 2 
lights, Deming Way - 5 lights, Dobson Street - 4 lights, Drury Lane - 2 lights, Glen Road - 3 lights, Gowing 
Road - 2 lights, Gunderson Road - 2 lights, Hathaway Road - 3 lights, Kendall Street - 1 light, Longview 
Road - 2 lights, Lowell Street - 1 light, Main Street - 6 lights, Marie Drive - 3 lights, Marcus Road - 5 
lights, Nichols Street - 2 lights, Oakdale Road - 3 lights, Oakridge Circle - 4 lights, Patricia Circle - 1 
light. Pilling Road - 2 lights, Roosevelt Road - 2 lights, and Salem Street - 1 light, or do anything in relatio 
thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 11. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 12. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. 



114 



ARTICLE 13. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purpose of completing an inventory of town owned property, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and approp- 
riate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrow- 
ing or otherwise the sum of Seventy Five Thousand ($75, 000.00) Dollars and appropriate the same for the 
purpose of acquiring a site and constructing a Municipal Garage or Public Works Building, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum not 
to exceed Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($2, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for installing a catch 
basin at or near the receiving tomb on Main Avenue in Wildwood Cemetery and that the part of such amount 
not used for catch basin be used for hot topping Main Avanue as far as the money will permit, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and approp- 
riate a sum of money not to exceed Fifteen Hundred Dollars ($1, 500.00) for the purpose of extending the town 
fire alarm signal telegraph line and purchasing and connecting fire alarm signal boxes and other necessary 
appurtenances thereto, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds the svim of 
Four Hundred Dollars ($400. 00) to pay for balance due for engineering services in preparing plans for town 
sewerage system not covered by grant from the U. S. Government, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws by inserting therein a new chapter 
numbered, entitled and reading as follows, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Chapter 5a. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE OPERATION OF MOTOR-DRIVEN BOATS 
IN THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON. 

Section 1. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat unless he shall have first registered the same 
with the Chief of Police and obtained a certificate of registration together with a registration number 
for the boat which shall be displayed on both sides of the bow in numerals at least six inches high. Said 
numerals maybe painted on removal boards. The Chief of Police may revoke the registration of any 
boat, the operator of which has been convicted of violating any of the rules or regulations contained in 
this chapter. 

Section 2. No motor-driven boat shall be operated unless the motor has an underwater exhaust or is 
equipped with a muffler which complies with the standards set up by the Department of Public Safety. 

Section 3. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- 
mington at such a speed or in such a manner as to endanger the lives and safety of others or the property 
of others or in such a manner as to cause danger of collision with other watercraft or in such a manner 
as to create excessive wash or wake so as to interfere with the operation and safety of other watercraft, 
endanger bathers or damage property. 

Section 4. The operation of a motor -driven boat on any lake pond or river in the Town of Wilmington 
under conditions and/or in places or areas as hereinafter indicated at speeds greater than as so indicated 
shall be considered to be in violation of these rules and regulations. 



115 



(a) When approaching or leaving the shore or a pier or when passing wiihin one hundred feel of a bather 
or a bathing area or another boat or when passing within one hundred feet of the shore except in a loca- 
tion where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, three miles 
per hour. 

(b) When passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from a bather or bathing 
area or another boat or when passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from 
the shore except in a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no 
dwellings exist, seven miles per hour. 

(c) When passing within five hundred feet of but over two hundred feet distant from the shore except in 
a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, ten 
miles per hour. 

(d) In any location during the hours from one -half hour after sunset to one -half hour before sunrise, 
seven miles per hour. 

Section 5. During the period commencing one -half hour after sunset and ending one -half hour before 
sunrise every motor -driven boat shall display a fully visible white light. 

Section 6. No person shall operate a motor -driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- 
mington within fifty feet of a bather or bathing area at any time except for life-saving purposes. 

Section 7. No person shall operate a motor -driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- 
mington while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. 

Section 8. Row boats, canoes and sailing boats shall have the right of way at all times. 

Section 9. The above rules and regulations are to be enforced by authorized police officials of the Town 
of Wilmington, and the violation of the above rules and regulations shall for each offense be punished by 
a fine of not more than Twenty Dollars ($20, 00). 



Request of the Board of Selectmen. 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and/or the Board of Water Commiss- 
ioners and/or the Town Manager to execute and deliver on behalf of the Town a deed of release running to 
Harry E. Wood of said Wilmington to all rights in a certain portion of his land lying on the northerly side of 
Hillside Way in saic Wilmington which was taken by the Board of Water Commissioners by eminent domain 
through inadvertence in excess of the area actually intended to be taken; the area to be released being that 
portion of the area so taken lying outside or beyond the boundaries set forth in the following description: 

Beginning at a point on the North Side of Hillside Way, 457. 57 feet from the Wilmington-Burlington Towi 
line, thence Northerly 400 feet along the land now or formerly of William F and Barbara E. Roberts, 
thence Easterly 200 feet more or less to the land now or formerly of Dante L. and Del C. Gattoni, thenc 
South along said land 268 feet, to Hillside Way, thence by the line of Hillside Way 225 feet to the point o) 
beginning. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 268 of the Acts and Resolves of 1952. 

An Act providing that Police Officers of certain Cities and Towns shall be given an additional day off 
duty or, under certain circumstances, an additional day's pay when they are required to work on certair 
legal holidays. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of George S. Gushing and others. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 57A of Chapter 48 of the General Laws, which 
reads as follows: 

S 57A. Additional Day Off, or Pay, for Certain Fire Fighters, etc. , Required to work on Certain Lega 
Holidays; Acceptance of Section Regulated - If any permanent member of the fire fighting force or fire 
alarm division of a fire department of a city or town is required to serve a tour of duty during the 



116 



twenty-four hour period commencing at eight o'clock in the morning of January first, February twenty-sec- 
ond, April nineteenth. May thirtieth, July fourth, the first Monday of September, October twelfth, November 
eleventh, Thanksgiving Day or Christmas Day, or the day following when any of the five days first mentioned, 
or October twelfth, November eleventh or Christmas occurs on Sunday, he shall be given an additional day 
off, or, if such additional day off cannot be given because of personnel shortage or other cause, he shall be 
entitled to an additional day's pay; provided, that any such member who through a rotation of shifts, works 
different days in successive weeks shall be granted, in each year in which the number of holidays falling on 
his regular days off is in excess of the nximber of holidays in such year falling on Saturday, additional days 
off equal to the excess, and, if any such additional day off cannot be given because of personnel shortage or 
other cause, an additional day's pay shall be allowed in lieu thereof. This section shall take effect in a city 
having a Plan Z charter when accepted by the affirmative vote of a majority of the city council, and in the 
case of other cities by vote of the city council, subject to the provisions of its charter, and in a town by a 
majority vote at an annual town meeting, but not otherwise, (1953, 640, appvd. July 2, 1953; effective 90 days 
thereafter). Request of George S. Cushing and others. 

ARTICLE 2 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 47E of Chapter 31 of the General Laws in regards 
to annual compensation of each permanent employee of the Welfare Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of Andrew P. Ring and others. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 108D of Chapter 41 of General Laws in regard 
to minimum annual compensation of each permanent fire fighter in the Fire Department, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of Frederick M. Kleynen and others. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain 
for the purpose of a police station site, that parcel of land situated on Church Street substantially in the 
location of the private way known as Olson Road and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for 
said purpose and determine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds in the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of 
Sale ctmen. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken under Article 40 of the warrant for 
I the annual meeting held in March, 1958, providing for the acquisition of a site, the erection and equipment 
of a police station thereon and the appropriation of $65,000.00 to cover the cost thereof, $5000. 00 of which 
amount was to be raised by taxation and the balance by borrowing, or do anything in relation thereto. Request 
of the Board of Selectmen. 

I ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $75, 000. 00 or any lesser amount for the purpose 
of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a new police station upon land already owned by the 
Town, and to determine how said appropriation is to be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer or by 
borrowing, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept Hathaway Road Extension, Pilling Road, Gunderson 
Road and Draper Drive as public town ways as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Plann - 
ing Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary 
to effect the purpose of the article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and 
determine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in 
the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct Longview Road, Ledgewood Road, Glen- 
view Road and Hilltop Road as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board accord- 
ing to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the 
.Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easement as may be necessary to effect the 
jl purpose of the article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine 
how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, 
or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 



117 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Beeching Avenue as appro- 
ved by the Planning Board and nnade by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment 
of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease- 
ments and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to extend the present Industrial area located on the southerly side 
of Burlington Avenue, Wilmington, Massachusetts, as follows: Westerly by Floradale Avenue, Two Hundred 
twenty-six and 72/100 feet (226. 72); Southerly by land now or formerly of Hamilton, Two Hundred fifty-two 
and 37/100 feet (252. 37); Northeasterly by land owned by Roderick Wm. Hoag on a line parallel with the rail- 
road line, Two Hundred Seventy and 53/100 feet (270. 53); and Northwesterly by said Burlington Avenue One 
Hundred sixty-five and 87/100 feet (165.87). The above described area containing 49,263.70 feet. On re- 
quest of William E. Rogers and others. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence B to Neighborhood Business District the following described parcel of land: Lots 171 through 173 
inclusive and 179 and 180 all as shown on a plan of Land known as Silver Lake Pines Addition, a copy of whic 
is on record at the Assessors Office and more particularly described as follows: Northeasterly by Lot 170 
one hundred twenty -one and 33/100 feet (121.3 3); Northwe sterly by Maple Road twenty- nine and 84/ 1 00 (29.8' 
feet. Southwesterly by Lots 174 through 178 one hundred twenty-eight and 57/100 (128.57) feet, Northwesterl 
by Lot 178 one hundred (100) feet, Southwesterly by Main Street one hundred ten and 03/ 100 (1 10. 03) feet. 
Southeasterly by Oakwood Road two hundred forty-four and 07/100 (244.07) feet, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of Frances M. Corneliussen and others. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A District to Industrial District the following described parcel of land: A certain parcel of land 
off Lowell Street bounded Westerly by West Street, 440 feet. Northerly by land of various owners, 1207 feet, 
Easterly by land of the Boston and Maine Railroad and State Route #93, Southerly by land of Minot and Ruth 
Anderson and John C. Elia or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Michael J. Elia and others. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A to Industrial Zone an area on the north side of Lowell Street, bounded as follows: Starting at a 
County Bound on the north side of Lowell Street, thence northerly to the prc^perty formerly of Carter 
(approximately 460'), thence easterly 327' along said property line to Interstate Highway #93; thence souther 
along said Highway 517' to Lowell Street; thence westerly along the north side of Lowell Street by three 
courses of 182', 30' and 115' to point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of James R. 
Anderson and others. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A to General Business District the following sections of land. The land in the southern section of 
Wilmington, bounded as follows: Being all that land now owned by grantee and used as a Real Estate Office, 
said triangular lot of land, bounded as follows: Five Hundred Twelve feet (512) on New Main Street, Six 
Hi'.ndred Forty-nine feet (649) on Old South Main Street, consisting of One and Forty-four Acres (1.44) as 
shown on Plan, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Mary Quigley and others. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing zoning regulations as established by a 
Special Town Meeting dated November 28, 1955 are amended so that the premises located at 306 Main Street 
Wilmington, Massachusetts now zoned as suburban rural area be changed to that for general business use, 
and that said premises are more particularly described as follows: Being numbered 306 on the Easterly 
side thereof on Lot 1 on a plan dated November 3, 1926 recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds, Book 
of Plans 49, Plan 73 and bounded and described as follows: Beginning on the Southwest corner of Main Stret 
as Lot 7 on said plan thence running Northwesterly on Main Street nineteen and 54/100 (19. 54) feet to a ston« 
bound, thence still by Main Street Thirty-six and 96/100 (36.96) feet to angle, thence Northerly and North- 



118 



easterly on a curbed line Fifteen (15) feet more or less to a stone bound, thence Easterly on Clark Street 
One Hundred Forty-five and 96/100 (145. 96) feet to Lot 2 on said plan, thence Southerly on Lot 2 Sixty-six 
and 75/100 (66. 75) feet to Lot 7 on said plan, thence Westerly by Lot 7 One Hundred Thirty-nine and 32/100 
(139. 32) feet to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Edward J. Curtis and 
others. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds the sum 
of Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000.00) and appropriate the same for the purpose of constructing a municipal 
Dog Pound, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 41, Section llOA of the General Laws that any 
public office in a town may remain closed on any or all Saturdays as may be determined by vote of the Town 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this day of February, A. D. One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and Fifty -nine. 



el 

f 

)k 
el 
ml 



Francis J. Hagerty 
Charles H. Black 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Wavie M. Drew 
Donald G. Kidder 



Board of 
Selec tmen 



119 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



ANALYSIS OF THE CASH ACCOUNT - for the year ending December 31, 1958 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1958 

Balance as at January 1, 1958 

Add: Cash Receipts January 1 through December 31, 1958 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures during year 1958 

Returned Check, reported as uncollectible during year 1958 
Balance on Hand as at December 31, 1958 - Carried forward to 1959 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



$ 438, 179. 9f 
4,432, 613.0- 
4, 870, 793. Oi 
4, 081, 643. 9 ^ 
789, 149. l' 
334. 0( 



788, 815. i; 



Tax Collections: 
Prior years' levy 

Current year's levy 



TAXES 

Poll 38.00 

Personal Property 3,514.65 

Real Estate 69, 523. 82 

Poll 5,112,00 

Personal Property 55,299.89 

Real Estate 1,084,974.26 

Farm Excise 210.28 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 

Unapportioned Street Betterments 

Street Assessments Added to Tax Bills 

Water Assessments Added to Tax Bills 

Apportioned Street Betterments Paid in Advance 



73, 076. 47 



1, 145, 596. 43 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Grants: 
Charitie s 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 13,029.04 

Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 1,254.81 

Old Age Assistance, Assistance 44,303.00 

Old Age Assistance, Admin, 3, 1 72, 84 

Disability Assistance , Assist. 3,609.24 

Disability Assistance, Admin. 715,08 
Schools 

Smith-Hughes & George Barden Account 
Public Law 874 
Public Grants 



Construction Grants -in -Aid (Highways) 
Comm, of Mass. Chapter 81 & 90 
Middlesex County Treas., Chapter 90 



14, 284. 75 

47, 475. 84 

4, 324. 32 

150. 00 
1 1, 473. 04 



33, 110. 96 
6, 713. 55 



66, 084. 91 
11, 623. 04 

39, 824. 51 



1,218, 672. 91 

3, 635.9' 
528. 2' 

4, 275. 
566.4 
845.9' 

1, 016. 1 , 

2, 133. 6 -, 



1 17, 532. 4 



RECEIPTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION - BUT NOT APPROPRIATED 



Repayments, Middlesex County Dog Officer 
Accrued Interest - Sale of Bonds 
Premium on sale of Bonds 



2,231. 30 
5,998. 51 
5,403. 13 



120 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Refunds from Appropriations 
Elecoveries O. A, A. Lein Law 
Reimbursement from Carter Lecture Fund 
Reimbursement from Sears, Cook, Walker Library Fund 
Water Department: 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Water Betterments 

Committed Interest on Water Betterments 



22, 145, 97 
1,460. 19 
2, 271. 24 
865. 50 
150. 61 

76,809.93 
2, 608. 89 
4,445. 87 
594. 54 



124,985. 68 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



Short Term: 

To pay Expenditures of Town Depts. until 
taxes are collected 

To carry on Chapter 81 &90 work until State 
and County reimbursements are received 
Temp. Loans in Anticipation of Serial Issues 
ong Term: 
Proceeds from Sale of Bonds 

Additions & Alterations Jr/Sr High School 

Glen Road School 

Erecting New Water Standpipe 

Water Betterments 

Public Sewer Mains 

Street Construction Bonn's 



698, 000. 00 

39, 975.00 
156, 000.00 



525, 000. 00 
450, 000.00 
152, 000. 00 

85, 000. 00 
106, 000. 00 

60, 000. 00 



893, 975. 00 



1, 378, 000. 00 



2, 271, 975. 00 



AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 



Withholding Taxes Deducted 
jletirement System Deductions 
ilue Cross /Shield Deductions 
iroup Life Insurance Deductions 

)og Licenses, Collected for Middlesex County Dog Officer 
rish & Game, Collected for Dept. of Conservation 
Zemetery Trust Funds 



116,021. 67 
21, 123. 58 
7, 687. 50 
1, 654. 68 
2, 188. 50 
1, 594. 50 
250. 00 



150, 520. 43 



RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION - RESTRICTED USES 



Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Selectmen's Land Sales 

Lcfunds from Previous Years' Appropriations 



3, 190. 00 
5, 271. 60 
465. 41 



8, 927. 01 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



>chool Lunch Program 

iigh School Athletic Association 

idult Evening School - Tuition Fees 

load Machinery Fund 

'etty Cash Fund 



68,437. 05 
5, 529. 57 
417. 60 
1, 676. 50 



76, 060. 72 
87. 45 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



ncome Taxes 
lorporation Taxes 



1 37, 324. 23 
18, 090. 00 



121 



Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Collections: 

Prior Years' Levy 

Current Year's Levy 
Licenses, Liquor 
Interest and Costs: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Collections 

Committed Interest on As se s sments /Street Betterments 
Interest on Deferred and Prepaid Assessments 
General Government: 
Selectmen's Receipts 

Town Collector's Receipts, Miscellaneous 
Town Clerk's Receipts 
Protection of Persons and Property 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 1,572.00 
Plumbing Permits 1,304.00 
Wire Permits 2, 276. 75 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Tree Department 
Police Department 
Public Works: 
Town Engineer 
Snow & Ice Removal /State 
Cemetery Department 
Board of Health: 

Sanitarian's Licenses & Permits 

Public Health Nurse's Receipts 

Div. of Tuberculosis - State Reimb. 

Dept. of Contagious Disease s /State Reimb. 

Clinics 

Charities & Soldiers Benefits: 

General Relief 2,094.52 

Disability Assistance 7,153.92 

Old Age Assistance 37, 581. 84 

Aid to Dependent Children 10, 073. 99 

Veterans Benefits 

Welfare Dept. /Office Space Rent 

Disability Assist. Admin/State Treas. Reimb. 
Schools and Libraries: 

School Construction Reimbursements 
School Transportation Reimbursements 
Vocational Training Reimbursements/State 

English Speaking Classes 

Miscellaneous High School Receipts 

Adult Evening School Tuition 

Public Library Receipts 
Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Meal Tax/State Treasurer 
4th District Court Fines 

Accrued Interest/Tax Antic. Notes 
Insurance Dividends & Reimbursements 

Various Miscellaneous Receipts 

Sewer Rentals 



122 



ANALYSIS OF FEDERAL GRANTS 



Charitie s: 


B alances 
as at 
1/1/58 


Grants 
Received 
in 1958 


Expenditures 
during 
1958 


Balances 

as at 
12/31/58 


Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin, 


1, 938. 81 
1, 631. 24 
3, 570.05 


11,983. 69 
1, 254, 81 
13.238. 50 


13,202. 39 
2, 221. 76 
15,424. 15 


720. 11 
664. 29 
1, 384. 40 


Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Administration 


1, 144. 55 
5, 381. 91 


43, 856, 40 
3, 172. 84 


43,223. 62 
2, 337. 21 


1, 777. 33 
6, 217. 54 




6, 526.46 


47,029. 24 


45, 560. 83 


7,994. 87 


Disability Assistance, Assistance 
Disability Assistance, Administration 


123.03 
220. 21 


3, 509. 49 
715. 08 


3, 591. 77 
763. 40 


40. 75 
171. 89 


Schools : 


343. 24 
10, 439. 75 


4, 224. 57 
64,492. 31 


4, 355. 17 
65, 340. 15 


212. 64 
9,591.91 


.Smith -Hughes, George Barden Fund 535.09 
Special School Account/Public Law 874 10, 017. 88 


150. 00 
1 1, 473. 04 


456. 00 

21 4Q0 Q2 


229. 09 




10, 552. 97 


11, 623. 04 


21, 946. 92 


229. 09 












ANALYSIS OF BORROWING CAPACITY 
Town of Wilmington, Mass - Year 1959 






BORROWING CAPACITY (Chapter 


44 Sec. 10 G/L) 










Valuations 


Abatements 


Net 
Valuations 


1958 Property Valuations 
1958 Motor Vehicle Excise 
1-957 Property Valuations 
1957 Motor Vehicle Excise 
1956 Property Valuations 
1956 Motor Vehicle Excise 




19,246,445 
2, 160, 291 

16, 774, 982 
2,218, 761 

15, 368, 020 
1,906,438 


777, 347 

C lij, 1 30 

678, 295 
228, 778 
550,900 
214, 311 




TOTALS 




57, 674, 937 


2, o59, 787 


55, 015, 150 


Average Valuation 

5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 


FUNDED DEBT 




18, 338, 416 
916, 920 




General, Inside Debt Limit 
General, Outside Debt Limit 
Enterprise, Water, G/L 

TOTAL: Funded Debt 1 / 1 / 59 






743, 000 

2, 165, 000 
418, 000 

3, 326, 000 




AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY 1/1/59 




173, 920 




Requirement Chapter 44, Sec 7 (25^ - 


$1, 000 Valuation) $4, 811. 61 







123 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



INSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 

High School Loan, Act 321/47 

$265, 000. 00 
Elementary School Loan, Wildwood 

School GL Sec 10 Chp 44 

$512,000.00 
Fire/Police Station Loan, GL Sec 10 

Chp 44 $60,000.00 

TOTALS 
OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 



High School Loan, Act 321/47 

$200, 000. 00 
Additions & Alter. Jr/Sr High 

School Act 645/48 $1,375,000,00 
Additions & Alter. Jr/Sr High 

School Act 645/48 $400,000.00 
Glen Road School Acts 645/48 

$450, 000. 00 
Water Bonds, Act 276/1926 

$350, 000.00 
First Water Extension Notes GL 

Sec 8 Chap 44 $75, 000.00 
Water Bonds/New Well Fields GL 

Sec 8 Chap 44 $60,000.00 
Water Meters -Betterments & Improv. 

to Existing System GL Sec 8 

Chap 44 $145, 000. 00 
Water Standpipe, Gl Sec 8 Chap 44 

$152, 000. 00 
Water Betterments 1957, GL Sec 8 

Chap 44 $35,000.00 
Water Betterments 1958, GL Sec 8 

Chap 44 $50, 000. 00 
Public Sewer Mains, GL Sec 10 

Chap 44 $106, 000. 00 
Street Betterments 1956, GL Sec 10 

Chap 44 $30,000.00 
Street Betterments 1958, GL Sec 10 

Chap 44 $60, 000.00 

TOTALS 

COMBINED TOTALS 



Balances 
as at 
1/1/58 



160, 000. 00 

400,000.00 
40, 000. 00 
600. 000. 00 

130, 000. 00 
1, 140, 000. 00 



12, 500.00 
20, 000. 00 
45, 000. 00 

145, 000. 00 





30, 000. 00 



1, 522, 500. 00 
2, 122, 500. 00 



Added 
during 
1958 



125,000. 00 
400, 000. 00 
450, 000. 00 









152, 000. 00 
35, 000. 00 
50, 000. 00 

106, 000, 00 


60, OOP, 00 
1, 378, OOP, 00 
1, 378, 000, OP 



Paid off 
during 
1958 



15, POO, PO 

25, POO, 00 
5, OOP. 00 
45, POO. 00 

10, 000. 00 
70, 000. 00 





12, 5PP. PO 
5, PPO. 00 
5, 000. 00 

19, 000.00 





8, 000. 00 



129. 500. 00 
174, 500. 00 



Balances 

as at 
12/31/58 



145, OPP. PO 

375, 000. 00 
35, 000. 00 
555, 000. OP 

12P, PPP. PP 
1, 195, POO, OP 
4PP, OOP, PP 
45P, 000, 00 


15, 000. 00 
40, 000. 00 

126, 000. 00 
152, 000. 00 
35, 000. 00 
50, OOO. 00 
106, 000. 00 
22, OOP, PP 
6P, 000. PO 
2. 771, 000, OP 
3, 326, PPP, 00 



124 



SCHEDULE OF SHORT TERM LOANS 



Balance Added Paid Off Balance 

as of during during as of 

1/1/58 1958 1958 12/31/58 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation 

of Tax Collections 200, 000.00 698, 000. 00 898, 000.00 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation 

of Reimbursement (Highway) 21,700.00 39,975.00 -21,700.00 39,975.00 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation 

of Serial Is sues /Bonds 235,000.00 156,000.00 391,000.00 



TOTALS 456, 700.00 893,975.00 1,310, 700.00 39,975.00 



LOANS AUTHORIZED BUT NOT YET ISSUED 

Unissued 

Authorized 12/31/. 58 

New Police Building 60,000.00 60,000.00 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1958 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF YEAR ENDING 12/31/58 



Used by the 
Assessors on 
1958 Tax Rate 



Actual 
1958 
Receipts 



Receipts 
more than 
Estimated 



Receipts 
less than 
Estimated 



Income Tax 

Corporation Tax 

Reimb. Public owned Land 

Old Age Tax (Meals) 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

License s 

Special Assessment 
General Government 
Protection Persons & Property 
Health & Sanitation 

Charities (other than Federal Grants) 
Old Age Assistance other than Federal) 
Veterans Services 

Schools (Income Tax not to be included) 
Librarie s 
Ceme teries 
Interests 

State As sistance /School Construction 
Farm Animal Excise 
Unclassified 
Sewer Rental 



128, 
15. 

1. 
108, 
4. 
5, 
6, 
5, 
2, 

21. 

34, 
8. 

35. 

3. 
4. 
57, 

1, 



408. 95 
405. 79 
60. 25 
867. 20 
000. 00 
000. 00 
500. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
400. 00 
700. 00 
800. 00 
700. 00 
000. 00 
400. 00 
000. 00 
200. 00 
347. 00 
240. 00 
900. 00 



137, 
18, 

2, 
1 32, 
4. 
4, 
5, 
5, 
2. 

19. 

37, 
6, 

28, 

3. 
4. 
26, 

6. 
4, 



324. 23 
090, 00 
60. 25 
791. 3' 
616. 62 
000. 00 
171.51 
512. 27 
846. 50 
723. 25 
612. 94 
581. 84 
660, 14 
799. 80 
517. 83 
916. 50 
496. 19 
472. 89 
210. 28 
797. 11 
000. 00 



8,915. 28 
2, 684. 21 

924. 1 1 
24, 616. 62 



846. 50 
323. 25 

2, 781. 84 



117. 83 
916, 50 
296. 19 



4, 807. 11 
4, 000. 00 



1, 328. 49 
487. 73 



2, 087. 06 

2, 039. 86 
6, 200. 20 



30, 874. 11 
29. 72 



443, 929. 19 



452, 1 1 1. 46 



51, 229. 44 



43, 047. 17 



125 



a o- 

■< X m 

^. fcg o 

CQ o 

■a * otj 

> O 

O 5 



3 



0) 



U4 PQ 



c 

4) 00 

> in 



C 

^ ctj Zh 



&0 



c 

lU ^ 

a s 



^ (U C 

e ^ i> 

o m X- 

5 «> I. 

< 5 s 



o d ^ 

0* H 



o 
o 



ino--t^OsDooinr-vOin 



00 



(M in 

00 rf) 



o in sO 

-H rO 



^ CO in 
(SI M 
^ m 00 rg 



ina^t^ooooinr-NOin 
f\jo^^Mininin^rO'<}< 



00 



in nO 

r- 

^ o 



00 o 
a- rg 

rO 00 (M 



ooin-*in-HfOO'*rginrOTtiin 
-^vo<*ir~oinoo'l"-*'*ooNom 



00 — -o-oinTfoooo 
in — -"tt^rgooo---* 

— (M^O0000^O(^J 



— I 00 o o 
O O 1^ o 

— < (M in 



— (VJ — 



vOininrooTj<m(\i 



oo^^ooooooooooo 

OOt'lOOOOOOOOOOO 



oosOoooino^-^Tfoooo 
oin'<i<oooo^-*'^inoooo 
rgrnroc^ooorMooo^ooinin 



(^-Hr-ininrofoinTj<M 



■* o o o 

ro o o o 



— o ^ o 



oooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooo 



oomoooincj^o-^oooo 
o>n(Njoooa>'<*"(Minoooo 

rgrOrjTfooOfMOOO^OOOin 



ro — r-inint*if«iin^<vj 



o 



0>' 



00 

in 
o 



00 
(M 



o in 00 — vO 
00 o >o nO 



o — m 

— (VJ 00 — 1 



o in 00 — 

00 O nD sD 



o — in 

-.O — <M 00 — 
rg (Nj 



o •-" in fvj •<}< 
rsj in in 



o o 

CO oo 

(M a- 



1^ (Nl (M nO 

r- a- 00 (M <^ 
in rsj — in in 



r- sD <M ■<»< fvj 



o o o o 
o o o o 



•<t O O vO o 

■<!< o o in — in 
o 00 in — 00 in 



(7^ nD rg in (Nj 



Tj< o O ^ CT^ o 

o o in ■<i< in 
o CO in -H r- in 



o o 
o o 
00 o 



o (M in (vj 





in 








o 


IN) 


r- 


CO 




00 


o 


rg 




-1 


•— < 


o 








o 


in 


00 






in 




o 




















CO 














ro 




<M 


in 










r- 




If 


vO 








r- 
























rg 






•<i' 






























in 




in 








o 


rg 


r~ 


00 




00 


o 


rg 




in 




o 


ro in 






o 


in 


ro 






in 




o 




o- 




(VJ 


— nD 


o 


o 


rg 




-O 




CO 


•* 








00 




(M 


in 














■<r 










in 
























rg 






ty- 






























ro 


































in 


sO in 


o 


o 


o 


00 


m 


rg 




rg 


o 


00 












o 


o 


o 




sO 


in 


rg 


•<r 






rg 






r~ 


00 ■<1< 


o 


o 


ro 


in 


m 


00 




in 


o 


00 




>o 




rg 


rg 


o 


o 


rri 


o 


r~ 


a- 


o 




in 










in 


r~ — 


o 




00 








r- 




in 












































ro 












r~ 




in 




































































in 


o 


o o- 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


a- 


00 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


in 




o 


o — 


o 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


in 




in 


in rg 


o 


o 




rg 


in 


o 


in 


O 


o 


in 


o 


rg 




in 




o 




00 




rg 


in 


00 


CO 


00 




in 


-o 




































m rg 














t-* 


o" 


in 






o 






























rg 


in 


o 








o 


















a~ 


00 


o 


or 






o 


















in 




o 


(*io' 






in 


















X 


CO 


in 








r~ 
























vO 






m 
















































■o 






u< 






^ 






















o 


o o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o < 


3 




o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o < 






o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 1 






o 


in o 


o 


o 




rg 


in 


o 


in 


o 


o 


in 


O I 






cr- 


o 


o 






•<(< 


rg 


in 


00 


CO 


00 




in - 


■J* 



CO 00 



m rg CO 



O 




H H CQ H a< H 



4) CQ 

C 

0) 

a 
w Ui ■ 



n 0) 



n) 



B 

a z; 

X 3 



R) 
O 

n 

t- O 
(4 ^ 



2 



a 
Q 



u 


g 










stei 


3 


em 


unt 




>- 


<u 


m 





su 


w 


< 


cc 


»— ( 


e 


in 




<: 




Ian 


r- 


6 


(U 




(U 


Liar; 


o 


as 


< 


as 


c 
rt 


J3 


(U 






-1 


urc 


Fir 


urc 


ire 


mbi 


P. 




Pi tn < 



u 

S ^ 
<: ^ 

.2 S 
jS 4) 

ID 2 1^ 



2 - 



O 



2 <«! 



3 O 
Oh U 



4J £ •< 

BO ^ rt 
O 3 O 



T3 d D 



u 
H 

V 
V 

^^ 
H 

(U 

2 



Q CQ pa W H 



Q. ^ 
>- O 

O H 



00 

o 

in 
p- 
« 

I 



o 




p* 






o 




o 




CO 


p* 


(M 




o 






CO 








CO 


CO 


o 






-X3 


p- 


O 








00 






CO 


r- 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 




CO 


o 


(NJ 








(VJ 


00 






CO 






00 








in 


00 










(M 












rg 










CO 


CO 








O 










o 




o 












o 




(VJ 


CO 




r- 




00 


00 


o 




o 




p^ 


o 






o 


CO 


m 








00 


CO 






CO 


CO 


Q 










(VJ 


00 






00 






00 


r- 


in 




in 


00 










(M 






(M 










p- 




-t 


CO 


CO 
























vo" 












o" 




















1 
















O 


in 






(M 


CO 




o 


00 


fVJ 




00 






in 


r- 


(M 


CO 


r- 


vO 




CO 




CO 


o 


CO 




C3^ 


in 




o 








o 


M 




t~ 






CO 


vO 


o 


<M 


00 


o 










in 




o 


CO 






in 






O- 


in 




o- 


00 


r- 






r- 




vO 


(M 




p- 






in 


r- 








o 




in 










CO 


M 






o- 






vO 










r<-i 


(M 






(VJ 














(VJ 




o 


o 




O 




CO 


O 


O 


O 


o 


p- 


o 


sO 


o 


o 


<Jv 


o 


o 


in 


o 


in 




O 


(VJ 


o 


o 


p- 


o 


o 


vO 


o 




o 


o 




o 


m 




O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


in 


CO 




o 


r- 


o 


o 




o 


(M 


in 


O 


M 


o 


o 


in 


p- 


00 




o 




o 




(VJ 


o 




sO 


in 


in 


o 


in 


■* 


a- 


o 




o 






<M 


in 


(M 


p- 




■<f 


CO 




•<»• 




















CO 


PsI 














Pvl 




















CO 




ooo 




o 


p- 


o 




o 




<jv 






in 




in 






OSD 




o 


p- 


o 


o 


vO 














CO 






oco 




o 


o 


in 


CO 






P-' 






o 






in 




cr-m 




o 


m 


p- 


00 






ov 






r- 














o 




(T- 


o 






















































ao'in 




CO 




00 














fl) 




It 


u 








(U 




T3 










o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 






o 




o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 






o 




o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 






o 





o o 
o o 



o 
o 



o o o 



o o o o 
ooo 



in 




o 




in 


















-O 




o 




o 


















P-" 




o' 




P-' 


















'-' 




o 
















































Ov 








Ov 


























CO 








1 






































































in 


























r- 


























• 




















































1 




























o 






O 


o 






o 












o 






o 


in 






in 












in 






in 




















(M 






fvJ 


CO 






CO 




CO 






CO 


(VI 








1 

00 






rg 




'-^ 




00 


(VJ 




o 






(VJ 






p- 




CO 




in 


o 










vO" 






(VJ* 




CO 




OV 


00 












p- 




(VJ 




(VJ 




in 


CO 


fvJ 






(VJ 




(VI 




Qs 




1—4 






•* 


















in 


CO 


o 


•<}• 


in 


(VJ 






-o 


00 






(VJ 


-o 




o 


CO 


(VJ 




o 






p- 






(VJ 












(^ 




o 




r 




o 






CO 


o 




in 








CO 




P- 




in 


_t 


(VJ 




in 




fVl 






fvl 


vD 


(M 




(T- 


Ov 








CO 

' 


















in 


p~ 


o 




(M 


CO 


vC 


o 




rj 


sO 


Ov 


p- 


CO 


CO 


o 


' — * 


in 


00 


a- 


o 


CO 


CVJ 


in 




(M 


fvl 


nO 


{ — i 


(VJ 


Q\ 


sO 




Q 


nO 


(VJ 


CO 




CO 


00 




o 


p- 


CJV 


sO 




in 




(VJ 


(M 


o 


in 


CO 


in 


OV 


in 


vO 


CO 






CO 


CO 


P- 


00 


CO 


00 


(VI 


- 


in 




in 


(7- 






in 




00 












CO 


1— t 






■-0 




p- 




o 










(VI 


















o 


o 


o 


o 


r~ 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




OV 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(VJ 


o 


O 


°1 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


00 


in 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 




p- 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 




in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


o 




o 




o 


■\ 


o 


in 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


(VJ 






in 


o 




in 






00 


%o 










CO 








CO 




« 














(VI 
















•—* 










1^ 


























(M 


o 


o 




o 






•* 












• 


• 






• 












































CO 




o 




Ov 






in 


in 














CO 




CO 






(VJ 


(VJ 










in 




J2 










J3 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


o 






sO 


o 


m 




o 


o 






o 


00 


o 






vO 


o 






in 


o 


(VJ 


> 


00 


CO 


(VJ 


sO 






p- 










o 


CO 










p- 








CO 




00 




o 





























o o o o 
o o in in 
o in 



o 
o o 



-H CM -< (VJ r~ -H 

^ CO (VI 



o o 
o in 



o 
o 



o o o o 
o o in in 
o in 



> 



J2 a H 



u 1 °o f~ °° 
d in in in 

^ a- (f 



V to 



lU 130 

lU C 

.S w 

ao (u 

C n 

O 3 



4^ 1; 

VM Q. 

CO ^ 

TO 

.s ^ 

O X 



8 ^ 

^ i. 



(fl a 

•O u 

<« u 

O 3 



c c 
o o 



U (J U b 



c 
o 

ao 
c 



C/l 01 ^ 



Ki >H lU 4) 4) 5 
rt\ fn ri rt r» I*^ X 



u 

(U f 

o O O - -H W g 

cr- (3D QO <+H ^ 

h h ^1 h ® 

4) 4> 4} , C 

4-* ■*-» W 4-1 -w OJ 



a O. 
(fl (fl 

U U 



a o. 
(fl (fl 

u u 



a 

It c u 
U U O 



(fl 

£ d 

(U (fl 
g 

° s 

c ffl 

CO J 



X 00 

00 c 



c 
(fl 

E " 



e 
o 

B 

B 

o 
O 
c 

o 
H 

00 

c 

> 
o 

h 

(9 

C 00 
o "= ™ 

o -a. s 

a (0 m J, 
(J c c 

U (fl (fl (U 

u 



o 

T3 

(fl 

g 



CO „ 



4> 
B 
9) 



^1 

< < 



il It 

a. 3 

X T3 



< > 



C 

a 

X 



m ^ 

CO <u V 
VH ^ 



° S 
PU H 



O 60 " 

H c 



rt (1) 
3 0) 

c 

< 



a 
o 
^1 
a 
a 
< 



Z 

o 

H 
Oh 

o 

ei 

Oh 

tn 
O 

H 
H 



in 
o 



r- 00 



rg o O 
— I ^ 00 
00 (M 



O 

r- -H 



^ Pvl CO ^ ro nO 

(M cr> o in -< vo 



(\j in o 

^ '-t r- 

00 rg o o r- -H 



•>f >0 (VJ o 

o in 



O -H 00 vO 

<M o O 
r- vO in 



O 00 00 



r~ CO f\j 

^ CO 



o 





o 


00 


O 




o 


m 


■* 




O 




o 


in 


IT- 




oo" 


in 






O 


(M 












<M 









o in 
in 



o o 
o ^ in 



o (M 



o in 00 o 



in 



•^OOfMOIT-OOvOOOO 
^OOrooOO'^'^OOO 



tJ* rn nO O ^ 

r~ (Nj o 
(sj in in r~- 



(SJ o o 

00 00 in in o 

CO v£> (M 



o rg Tf 



in 




O (M 




o 


o' 


in 


1 ° 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(SI 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




a- 




O O 




o 


o 




o 


(SI 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(SI 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


(VI 


(M 


in -o 


in 


o 


a- 




o 




o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


sO 




o 




in 


m 




(M 


■* 


o 


in 


in 


in 


00 


in 


o 




o 


00 


o 


in 


in 


o 


in 




o 




in 


o 


in 




(M 


O- 


vO in 


o 


in 


00 


00 


(SI 


in 


r- 


in 






CO 


o 


r~ 


(SJ 








o 


(SI 


in 


in 


o 


CO 


oo" 


ro 


(SI in 






oo" 










(SJ 








o" 




(SI 








in 


<T 


(SI 


■*" 




■*" 




00 














































■<*" 


(SI 


in 












r~ 




































(SI 


r- 






OISJO 








o 




CO 






o 














o 


ISJ 




o 








(T 






ooo 








(SI 




(SI 




















o 


(SJ 


















in'^o 


in 










c^* 




















o 


r-' 












(T 






(Sl^vO 












00 




















in 


(*1 




vO 








<T 




o 




o 






r- 




in 


































t~ 












































(SJ 








CO 




<t 




It 










^ 




















<« 


(fl 












sD 


in 


o 


o o 




o 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


in 


(T- 


o 


o o 




o 


o 


a- 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 






o 




o 


o 


o 


rO 


(M 


CO 


O (M 




o 


a- 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 






o 






o 




sO 






O (VJ 




o 


in 


o 


in 


o 


vn 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


in 


in 


o 






o 


CO 


in 


o 


in 




(M 


00 


(M Tf 




in 


CO 




(SI 


o 


r- 


in 


o 




(*1 


o 


r- 


(SJ 








o 


o 


in 


in 


o 


o 


00 


o 


(M in 




r- 


CO 


ro 


-.o 


CO 




(SI 








o 




IM 








in 


r-" 


(SJ 




r~ 






00 










ro 






























•<i< 








in 


in 












r- 





























































































00 



o o 
Tj< in 



IM 



o 



S J2 

(fl X ^ 
u) ^ O 



e 

o 
O 

(0 (J 

£ < 



<L> 

a 
O 

"o 
o 

X 

u 

CO 



T3 O 3 

<! > .0h 




0) u 

Q 

60 

c 



(1) 



CO 
(SJ 



T3 OS 



01 It 
- M 

a 

o 



(0 



(4 ^^ 



m 
c 

3 5 



C 
V 

E 

CO 

u 
3 

g 

<u 
oi 



c 

< 

(0 

c 
(If 
o 

J 

>< 

(« 
M 
O 

a 



(. S 
Ctf W H 



(« J u -O d) 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/58 



REFUNDS : 
Taxe s 
Prior Years 
Current Levy 
Poll Tax 

Personal Property 

Real Estate _8 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 

Prior Years 1 
Current Levy 3 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Water Liens 1957 

Street Assessments Added to Taxes 
Committed Street Interest Added to Taxes 
Water Rates 

Unappor tioned Water Assessments 
Overpayments Tax Collectors Office 
Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Selectmen's Land Sales 

Interest & Costs-Tax Collections & Tax Titled Redeemed 
Building Inspector Fees 
Sanitary Inspection Fee 

Total Refunds Paid 
Petty Cash Advances 
Legal Settlements Paid 
State & County Assessments: 
County Hospital Assessment 
County Tax Assessment 
County Retirement Assessment 
State Parks Assessment 
State Audit Assessment 
Agency & Trust Funds: 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Blue Cross /Shield 
Withholding Deductions 
Retirement System Deductions 
Group Insurance Deductions 
Dog Licenses Collected for County 
Fish & Game Licenses Due Dept. Conservation 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
Premium Sale of Bonds /Fees 
Town Functions (Not appropriated) 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Adult Evening School 

Water Department Maintenance & Operation 
Water Betterments - 1958 
Barrows Well Field 
Construction of New Standpipe 

West Street Extension - 1955 Water Extensions 
Public Sewer Mains 



129 



1, 584. 48 

6. 00 
45. 68 
8, 292. 94 



006. 10 
780, 26 



7, 
16. 
15, 



460. 96 
298. 67 
127. 85 



3, 



707. 78 
78. 47 



7. 

116, 
21. 
2, 
2. 
1. 



687, 50 
021. 67 
123, 58 
967. 98 
210. 50 
621, 50 
250, 00 



9,929. 10 



4, 786, 36 
25. 10 
15. 00 
5. 00 
4. 05 
130. 22 
48. 20 



38, 887. 48 
3, 786, 25 
346, 00 



151, 882. 73 



79,977, 79 
4, 770. 76 
438, 34 
112, 576, 66 
39, 859. 83 
1, 267, 80 
93, 756. 19 
2, 255, 15 
104, 196. 12 



14, 764. 61 

178. 42 
1,06 
2, 838. 59 
5, 00 
42, 53 
143. 50 
5. 00 
17, 974. 99 
115. 00 
1, 310. 00 



42, 673. 73 



152, 228. 73 
4, 325. 00 




Town Functions (Not appropriated) contd. 



Street Betterments - 1958 




54, 082. 87 


Additions & Alterations Jr/Sr High School 




316, 009. 74 


Construction of Athletic Field 




520. 64 


Construction of Glen Road School 




2,015. 49 


Federal Grants & Aid 






George Barden Fund - Schools 


456.00 




Public Law 874 - Federal Aid to Schools 


21, 490, 92 


21,946.92 


Aid to Dependent Children Aid 


1 3, 202. 39 




Aid to Dependent Children Administration 


2, 205. 80 


15,408. 19 


Old Age Assistance - Assistance 


43, 223. 62 




Old Age Assistance - Administration 


2,113. 05 


45, 336. 67 


Disability As sis tance. Aid 


3, 591. 77 




Disability Assistance, Administration 


763.40 


4, 355. 17 


Temporary Loans: 






Anticipation of Revenue /Taxe s 




898, 000. 00 


Anticipation of Serial Issue Loans 




391, 000. 00 


Anticipation of Reimbursement/Highway 




21, 700. 00 



811, 727. 38 



Land Court Entry Fee - Tax Title Takings 



87, 046. 95 



1, 310, 700. 00 
72.25 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 2, 428, 177. 75 



130 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1958 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 




Town Accountant (contd. ) 




Selectmen, Board of: 




Due s 


5. 00 


Salary, Clerk 


600. 00 


Travel Allowance 


50, 15 


Rental, Town Meeting Costs 


363. 02 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


2, 20 


Dues & Subscriptions 


50. 00 


Supplies, Office 


139, 17 


Printing & Advertising 


124. 18 




6, 698. 80 


Le gal Fees 


3. 00 


Town Treasurer: 




Travel Expenses 


238. 96 


Salary, Administrative 


3, 900. 00 


Supplies, Office 


79. 02 


Salary, Admin. (Temp.) 


294. 00 




1, 458. 18 


Dues 


2. 00 


Election Expenses: 




Legal Fees, Tax Title Work 


3. 70 


Wages, Temp. Tellers, Etc. 


949. 75 


Recording Fees 


47, 03 


Printing, Ballots, Ads, Etc, 


93.44 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


62. 60 


Meals, Workers 


68. 46 


Special Services, Bank Charges 


300. 00 




1,111.65 


Supplies, Office 


484. 1 1 


Registrar of Voters: 




Outlay, Office Equipment 


155. 00 


Salaries, Administrative 


450. 00 




5,248. 44 


Salaries, Office 


155, 00 


Town Collector: 




Salaries, Clerical 


58, 50 


Salary, Administrative 


4. 264. 00 


Printing 


424, 85 


Services, Deputy Collector 


100. 00 


Services, Census 


1, 125, 00 


Due s 


4. 00 


Supplies, Office 


32. 99 


Advertising 


125. 00 




2, 246. 34 


Recording Fees 


279, 00 


Finance Committee: 




Repairs, Office Equipment 


82. 85 


Services, Clerical 


368. 75 


Supplies, Office 


690. 57 


Dues & Subscriptions 


25. 00 


Equipment, Office 


165. 00 


Printing 


190. 00 




5, 710. 42 


Advertising 


20. 00 


Town Clerk: 




Postage 


69. 00 


Salary, Administrative 


3, 432. 00 


Supplies, Office 


4. 00 


Due s 


7. 50 




676. 75 


Binding 


29. 50 


Town Manager: 




Postage 


1. 62 


Salary, Administrative 


8, 201. 74 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


20. 00 


Salary, Secretary 


2, 547. 60 


Supplies, Oliice 


107. 63 


Salaries, Clerical 


53. 25 


Outlay, Office Equipment 


351. 20 


Dues 


57. 50 




3, 949, 45 


Printing & Advertising 


2. 34 


Assessors, Board of: 




Mileage Allowance 


195. 00 


Salaries, Administrative 


4, 462. 04 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


39, 50 


Salaries, Office 


4, 085. 00 


Supplies, Office 


632, 13 


Salaries, Office (Temp.) 


1, 097. 87 


Supplies, Library 


95,95 


Due s 


60. 50 




11, 825. 01 


Printing 


15. 00 


Industrial Account: 




Binding 


94. 00 


Dues 


27, 00 


Recording Fees 


21. 57 


Printing 


285. 17 


Mileage Allowances- 


325, 63 


Advertising 


13, 00 


Supplies, Office 


440. 22 


Travel Allowances 


368, 45 




10, 601. 83 


Supplies, Office 


190. 91 


Town Counsel: 






884, 53 


Salary, Administrative 


1, 000. 00 


Town Accountant: 




Legal Fees 


1, 500. 00 


Salary, Administrative 


5,460. 00 




2, 500. 00 


Salaries, Office 


1, 042. 28 







131 



Town Hall: 






Outlay, Cruisers 


2, 289. 55 


Salaries, Office 


6, 032. 


00 






Salary, Janitor 


1, 704. 


00 


Fire Department: 




Postage 


1, 379. 


77 


Salary, Administrative 


5, 980. 00 


Electricity- 


681. 


77 


Salaries, Office 


13,728. 00 


Telephone 


1.795. 


88 


Salaries, Firemen 


35, 762. 82 


Water 


21. 


00 


Salaries, Vacation 


2, 361. 96 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


781. 


56 


Call Fire Rolls 


5, 299. 54 


Repairs, Building 


199. 


48 




63, 132. 32 


Supplies, Office 


314. 24 


Due s 


8. 00 


Supplies, Fuel Oil 


515. 


75 


Postage 


6. 27 


Supplies, Plant 


224. 


84 


Mileage Allowance 


600. 00 


Outlay, Office Equipment 


276. 


18 


Meals 


16. 75 


Outlay, Plant Equipment 


182. 


17 


Repairs, Radios 


117, 09 




14, 108. 64 


Repairs, Dept. Equipment 


69. 14 


Planning Board: 






Maintenance, Fire Alarm System 


724. 14 


Services, Clerical Special 


246. 


50 


Repairs, Vehicles 


588. 52: 


Dues 


30, 


00 


Supplies, Office 


30. 96- 


Printing 


101. 


00 


Uniforms 


341. 00- 


Advertising 


52. 


00 


Supplies, Rubberwear 


224, 70 


Recording Fees 


11. 


50 


Small Tools & Equipment 


123. 07 


Experts & Consultant 


2, 820. 


00 


Firefighting Supplies 


534, 21 


Supplies, Office 


9. 


55 


Gasolines & Oils 


902, 67 




3, 270. 


55 


Batteries 


23, 42' 








Flashlights & Batteries 


149. 45 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 




Medical Payments 


67. 25, 










4, 526. 64r 


Police Department: 










Salaries, Administrative 


5, 980, 


00 


Outlay, Firefighting 


2, 5 34. 541; 


Salaries, Office 


18, 318, 


00 






Salaries, Patrolmen 


34, 031. 


00 


Extending System 


1,434. 66 


Salaries, Vacation Help 


1,665, 


20 






Traffic Supervisors 


3, 600, 


00 


Ambulance Account: 




Salaries, Extra Detail 


2, 652. 


00 


Wage s 


944. 95 


Salaries, Matrons 


31. 


00 


Laundry & Cleaning 


61. 90 


Salary, Clerk 


1, 300. 


00 


Repairs, Vehicles 


246. 05 




67, 577. 


20 


Supplies, Bedding 


26. 42 


Dues 


5, 


00 


Gasoline & Oils 


248. 63 


Postage 


22. 


25 




1, 527. 99 


Telephone 


796. 


71 


Fire/Police Station: 




Mileage Allowance 


600, 


00 


Electricity 


665, 94 


Meals 


6. 


37 


Telephone 


457, 09 


Repairs, Radios 


191. 


18 


W^ater Charges 


25, 28 


Repairs, Vehicles 


964. 10 


Gas, Bottled 


26, 00 


Supplies, Office 


110. 17 


Repairs, Radio Base Station 


24. 69 


Supplies, Library 


50. 


00 


Repairs, Bldg. Emergency 


266, 12 


Supplies, Uniforms 


1,262. 60 


Supplies, Janitor 


78, 29 


Supplies, Rubberwear 


68. 00 


Supplies, Fuel, Heat 


1, 541, 42 


Supplies, Small Equipment 


472. 


92 


Plant Supplie s 


480, 71 


Gasoline & Oils 


1,952. 


04 


Major Repairs 


233. 18 


Supplies, Tires & Tubes 


199. 


97 




3, 798. 66 


Supplies, Batteries 


15. 00 


Constable: 




Supplies, Accessories 


29, 14 


Services, Administrative 


100. OC 


Supplies, Ammunition 


4. 


40 






Supplies, Flashlights & Batteries 


43, 06 








6,792. 


91 







132 



Civil Defense: 
Utilitie s 

Communications 
Transportation 
Repairs, Equipment 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Miscellaneous 
Supplies, Departmental 



Purchase of New C. D. Truck 

Dog Officer: 
Salary, Administrative 
Mileage Allowances 
Lease of Quarters 
Disposal of Dogs 

Building Inspector: 
Salary, Administrative 
Plumbing Fees 
Electrical Fees 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing 

Mileage Allowance 
Supplies, Office 

Board of Appeals: 
Services, Clerical 
Advertising 

Sealer of Weights & Measures: 
Salary, Administrative 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Small Tools 

Tree Warden: 



Salary, Administrative 

Dues 

Lights 

Telephone 

Mileage Allowances 
Repairs, Equipment 
Repairs, Vehicles 
Supplie s 

Supplies, Care of Grounds 

Gasoline & Oils 

Outlay, Mech. Equipment 



Outlay, Purchase New Truck 
Dutch Elm: 

Salaries, Tree Workers 
Repairs, Departmental Equip. 



239. 68 
31. 20 
262. 01 
254. 32 
40. 49 
281. 00 
1,016. 25 
2, 124. 95 

3, 000. 00 



400. 00 
360. 00 
675. 00 
398. 00 
1, 833. 00 

4,414. 00 
1, 028, 00 
1, 328. 60 
45, 00 
24. 00 
450. 51 
115. 37 
7,405. 48 

139. 50 
34. 13 
173. 63 

352. 15 
58. 25 
88. 12 

498. 52 

4,992. 00 
15. 00 
13. 26 
100. 28 
449. 24 
1 13. 37 
38. 75 
665. 34 
48. 40 
162. 83 
354. 15 
6, 952. 62 

4,496. 24 



5,452. 05 
59. 35 



Dutch Elm (contd. ) 

Supplies, Small Tools & Equip. 

Supplies, Chemicals 

Gypsy Moth Control: 
Salaries & Wages 
Lights 

Repairs, Equipment 
Supplies, Chemicals 

Town Forest: 



Wages 

Mosquito Control: 
Supplies, Chemicals 

Town Engineer: 

Salary, Administrative 

Wages, Assistant Engineer 

Recording Fees 

Mileage Allowances 

Repairs, Equipment 

Supplies, Office 

Supplies, Library 

Supplies, Small Tools & Equip. 



PUBLIC WORKS: 

Oiling Spec. Streets: 
Supplies, Sand, Gravel, Stone 
Supplies, Tar & Road Oils 

Street Betterments: 
Salary & Wages 
Rent, Equipment 
Contractual Services 
Supplies, Construction 

Highway Department: 
Salaries & Wages 
Rent, Building 
Trucks, Rent 
Rent, Equipment 
Lights 
Telephone 
Water 

Repairs, Maint. of Garage 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Garage & Maint. 
Supplies, Rubberwear 
Fuel, Heating 

Supplies, Small Tools & Equip. 

Supplies, Lumber 

Supplies, Paint, Kerosene, etc. 



424. 02 
500. 00 
6,435. 42 



5, 121. 65 
11. 32 
19. 13 
398. 60 

5, 550. 70 

148. 98 



748. 67 



6, 240. 00 
3, 609. 00 
27. 35 
291. 18 
55. 00 
255. 45 
16. 00 
222. 22 
10, 716. 20 



1, 844. 69 
3, 306. 05 
5, 150. 74 



9, 049. 86 
30, 039. 75 
191. 74 
14, 753. 26 
54, 034. 61 

31,712. 69 
330. 00 
9, 301. 50 
5,404. 75 
35. 08 
174. 94 
19. 50 
127. 00 
161. 34 
14. 51 
59. 84 
543. 75 
2, 014. 84 
11, 78 
148. 55 



133 



Highway Dept. (contd, ) 




Supplies, Glass & Putty 


2. 02 


Supplies, Fixtures & Bulbs 


11. 82 


Supplies, Hardware 


26.45 


Supplies, Sand, Stone, Gravel 


2, 137. 93 


Supplies, Patch 


1, 644. 86 


Supplies, Curbing 


1, 151. 47 


Supplies, Tar & Road Oils 


317. 17 


Supplies, Catch Basins, Culverts 


2, 423. 20 


Supplies, Signs 


1,0 30. 92 


Supplies, Flashlights & Batteries 


11. 40 




58,817. 31 


Road Machinery: 




Repairs, Road Machinery 


5,069. 15 


Gasoline & Oils 


5,033. 34 


Tires & Tubes 


1, 181.26 


Winterizing 


130. 20 


Batteries 


94. 69 


Fuel, Diesel 


36. 95 


Supplies, Vehicles 


91. 74 




11, 637. 33 


Chapter 90 Construction 1957: 




Salaries 8t Wages 


3, 876, 38 


Rent, Equipment 


14,481. 75 


Supplies, Operating 


357, 00 


Supplies, Construction 


4, 734, 17 




23,449, 30 


Chapter 90 Construction 1958: 




Salaries & Wages 


1, 697, 66 


Rent, Equipment 


4, 006. 00 


Supplies, Construction 


7, 049. 42 




12,753, 08 


Chapter 90 Maintenance: 




Salaries & Wages 


931, 02 


Supplies, Sand, Gravel, Stone 


1,409. 11 


Supplies, Tar & Road Oil 


1,946. 19 




4, 286. 32 


1^ ri 3 t" I* R 1 n.A a infr^na t\ r* ^ • 

y^xLcLlJLKZl O i. IVld Xll L C;? lid 11 ^ c . 




Salaries & Wages 


9, 124. 74 


Xv C [It y J— U U. J. LIIXl C 11 1. 


1 1 ^i? 50 


Supplies, Sand, Gravel & Stone 


5, 680. 22 


Supplies, Patch 




Supplies, Tar & Road Oils 


10,675.99 


Supplies, Culverts & Catch Basins 


1, 467. 38 


Signs & Fences 


1, 118. 50 




29, 802. 98 


Construction of Specified Streets: 




Supplies, Sand, Gravel & Stone 


758. 57 


Public Street Lights: 


14,534.75 


Land Reclamation: 


184. 67 


Public Sewer Mains: 


104, 196. 12 



Snow & Ice Removal: 




Salaries & Wages 


9, 700. 95 


Rent, Equipment 


7, 544. 20 


Meals, Emergency 


249. 95 


Repairs, Equipment 


2, 835, 79 


Supplies, Small Tools 8t Equip. 


171, 10 


Supplies, Salt & Sand 


4, 514, 41 


Supplies, Gasoline & Oil 


1, 125, 12 


Supplies, Tires & Tubes 


857, 53 




26,999. 05 


Parks: 




Wages, Maint. of Grounds 


108. 75 


Wages, Police Details 


562. 00 


Ele ctr icity 


10, 00 


Water 


13, 00 


Repairs, Fence & Maint. Boat 


97, 00 


Supplies, Equipment 


90,93 


Supplies, Sand 


5. 00 


Beach Extension 


1, 680. 19 




2, 566, 87 


Cemeteries: 




Wage s 


13,495. 60 


Postage 


4. 96 


Electricity 


13, 98 


Telephone 


175, 26 


Water 


21, 00 


nA^le^^nt^ All /"WT T-\ ^ 

iviiicagc x\iiow<xncc 


_> J , U V 


Repairs, Equipment 


129. 44 


Repairs, Vehicles 


66. 94 


Fuel, Heating 


155. 20 


Supplies, Department 


102, 32 


Flowers, Shrubs & Bulbs 


120, 50 


Gasoline & Oils 


96, 96 


Supplies, Liners 


1, 156, 40 




15, 572, 16 


Water Department: 




Water Betterments 1958 


39, 833, 83 


Improvements 


1, 267, 80 


Tools & Equipment 


13, 784. 95 


Operating Expense 


1,815, 94 


Pipes & Fittings 


10, 939. 10 


Brass Goods 


1, 963. 34 


Maintenance 


5, 545. 00 


Equipment & Supplies 


1, 707, 91 


Development 


7, 698, 29 


Office Supplies & Equipment 


1,513, 24 


Meters & Meter Parts 


7, 182, 08 


Superintendent Expenses 


605. 27 


System Maintenance 


59, 813. 83 




113, 836. 75 


Construction of Standpipe 




Hillside Way 


93, 756. 19 



134 



Purchase of Land, . , Off -Street 




V^rTrVXVX X 1 r o <x ^KJi-txJUi. xVO OJC INJl J; 1 X O* 






500. 00 










AAA ^Ifai*** AH TY\ ini cfrt'at'irtn' 

TV CXXax C- .TTLIII 1 XllX a L X cllxvjii. 




Landscciping & Improving Town Common 


1, 900. 00 


la T" 1 ^ c 

OClLciX XC D 








Rent, Quarters 


■37c nn 


Purchase, Highway Truck 


4,219.99 


Dues & Subscriptions 


27. 00 






Printing 


5. 39 


Purchase Vehicle, Engineer 


1,967. 85 


Postage 


77. 36 






Telephone 


226. 70 


Purchase & Install Control Board 




Legal Fee s 


12. 59 


Fire Alarm System: 


3, 570. 00 


Travel Allowances 


2. 00 






O 3 1 c 
IVIC cL L a 


14 7"^ 


^ LIU Oc Vi« LI LI 9 U • f CL XX XXI C CL U,U W Xv U 


8 882 


Supplies & Repairs, Vehicles 


1 yl TJ 

77 






Supplies, Office 


7 1 A 77 


X^Ux C rid ot^i *XfZ^ It. .n. C X XCL J. J^jdUUC ± 




Supplies, Department 


15. 90 


X X ^ X X c a x trX l a l • 


14. 00 


C* Q 9 7 7 7 


Const* New Police Building 


124. 50 


weiiare aiq: 


A n A7 7 1 


HEALTH & SANITATION- 




Aid to Dependent Children: 


IK 1 7 A HQ 
15,1 ^S'i . UO 


Health & Sanitation: 




1 A A ■ 

Old Age Assistance, Asst. : 


A Q Q 7 K 1 


Salary, Administration 


5, 720. 00 






Services, Clerical 


499. 75 


Disability Assistance; 


Q An7 7A 


Salarv PiiHlif Niit'^p 


3 640 00 




Salary "^iiVi s ti hi 1-p 


1 '^n on 

1 D\J , \}\J 


Veterans Aid: 




Salary, \ledical 


500. 00 


Salary 


1 , U4U . UU 


Salary, Animal Inspector 


250. 00 


Po s tage 


. UU 


i^ent, I_iaboratory 


200. 00 


Te lephone 


77 AC 


Due s 


41 . 65 


Travel Allowance s 


110. OD 


Printing 


432. 25 




1 n 74 


Advertising 


238. 00 


Veterans Aid 


1 7 An7 /li; 


Po stage 


6. 63 




1 Q Q n 7 Q 
1 0, oU ( . 47 


Recording Fees 


10. 10 


Cr^U/^/^T FMr TD A "D XAT "NTT 

OV_.rHJUlj JJr. i-^Art i JVLh. IN 1 




Mileage Allowances 


1, 178. 26 


■pnTTr* A T TOM A T 8. T TRP A R V 




Admin, of Housing Act 


208. 44 






Disposal of Animals 


144. 00 


Schools, Fducational: 




Supplies, Office 


262. 56 


iDdxcLry, ocnool ooiiixii. v^ierK 


-J\J\J . UU 


Supplies, Chemicals 


20. 93 


Expenses, School Comm , 




Supplies, First Aid 


9. 84 


Od-io. ry , oup t • vJii ic e 


1 A 7Ai^ R7 


Supplies, Medical 


43. 26 


Supplie s , Supt, Office 


1 7n 1 7 1 


Hospitalization 


943. 25 


odidxy, v^ensus ot /vttena, kjli ice r 


1 snn nn 

I , OUU . UU 


Immunization Clinic 


173. 00 


Salaries, Direc to r s & Supe r vi s o r s 




A.nti -Rabies Clinic 


326. 96 


odidixcby xiign ocnooi 


7n8 1 An ■^n 


Polio Clinic 


338. 00 


Texts Hicrh School 


7 676 02 




15, 316. 88 


Stationery & Supplies, H. S. 


10, 790. 56 






Salaries, Flementary 


241, 323. 50 


Garbage Collection 


9, 450. 00 


Texts & Instructional Aids Flem. 


8, 423. 04 


Town Dump 




Stationery & Supplies, Flem. 


6,911. 04 


9,999. 96 


Salaries, Substitute Teachers 


6,951.95 






Salaries, Fvening School 


5, 647. 58 






Physicians 


1, 500. 00 






School Nurse s 


7, 317. 37 






Health & Medical Supplies 


399. 85 






Mental Health Clinic 


750. 00 



135 



Schools, Educational {contd. ) 




Public Library: 




High School Utilities 


4, 989. 94 


Salary, Librarian 


2, 700, 0(4 


Elem. School Utilities 


6, 043. 46 


Wages, Asst. Librarian 


786, 2:' 


Bus Transportation 


19, 804. 12 


Wages, Janitor 


420, 0( 


Taxi Transportation 


1 , 061 . 00 


Services, Clerical 


288, 4: , 


Athletics, Transportation 


1, 399. 58 


Binding 


6 1 , 3' ' 


Out of State Travel 


451. 00 


Ele ctr icity 


166. s; 


School Libraries 


2, 728. 79 


Telephone 


93. 3.' 


Physical Education & Athletics 


5, 344. 98 


Water 


16, 5( 


Salary, Cafeteria Supervisor 


3, 120. 00 


Repairs, Building 


99, 0' 


Cafeteria Subsidy 


3, 075. 97 


Supplies, Office 


389. 5] 


Special Education 


544. 55 


Supplies, Books & Periodicals 


3,510, 3] 


Educational TV 


670. 00 


Fuel Oil 


167, OS ' 


New Equipment 


2, 608. 92 




8, 698, 34! 




603, 730. 72 


Re creation: 








Salary, Director 


850, 0( \ 


Additional & Alterations, 




Wages, Supervisors 


4, 929. OC 


Jr. /Sr. High School 


31 5, 859. 74 


Ele ctr icity 


101.7' 






Repairs, Bldgs. 


25, 95 


Construction of Athletic Field: 


520. 64 


Supplies, Office 


18,4: 






Supplies, First Aid 


46. \i 


Construction of Glen Road School: 


1, 715. 49 


Supplies, Playground & Beach 


198. 3: 






Supplies, Prize Awards 


75. OC 


Schools, Operating: 






6, 244, 64 


Salaries, H. S. Janitors 


14, 552, 00 


BONDS & INSURANCE: 


1 


Wages, H. S. Extra Help 


1 , 226. 00 


Bonds 


514. 35 


Repairs, H. S. Building 


1 , 940, 64 


Workmen's Comp. & P/L 


7 , 1 5 1 . 40 


Janitors Supplies, H. S. 


19. 20 


Public Liability, Vehicle 


6, 382. Taj 


Fuel, Heating H. S. 


6, 929. 03 


Fire & Theft, Vehicle 


293. OC 


Plant Supplie s, H. S. 


3, 057. 84 


Property Floater, Eng. Equip. 


39. 72 


Major Repairs, H. S. 


964. 85 


Accident, Vol. Fire Dept. 


152. IC 


Salaries, Elem. Janitors 


29, 725, 00 


Boiler Insurance 


297. 7^1 


Wages, Elem. Extra Help 


1 , 783. 63 


Fire & Ext. Coverage, Bldgs. 


4, 3 34. 94 


Rent, Elem. Classrooms 


1,991. 93 


Monies & Securities 


241. 87 


Elementary Repairs 


1, 603. 74 


Schedule Property Floater Camera 




Elem. Janitors Supplies 


362. 94 


Equip. , High School 


38. Ott 


Fuel, Heating Elem. 


1 1, 448. 35 


Schedule Property Floater Musical 




Plant Supplies, Elem 


4, 636. 24 


Equip, , High School 


27.9^ 


Major Repairs, Elem. Bldgs. 


4, 792. 77 




19, 473. %\ 


Salaries, Administrative 


5,460. 00 






Salaries, Maintenance Help 


10, 629. 00 


INTEREST: 




Telephone, Shop 


106. 20 


Water Bond Interest 


9,996,25 


Repairs, Shop Equipment 


505. 35 


Anticipation Notes Interest 


8, 914, Ot 


Repairs, Vehicles 


4Z, 4U 


Serial Issue Interest 




Small Tools & Equip. Shop 


98, 46 


Fire/Police Bldg. Interest 


1,031.^ 


Supplies, Repairs 


1, 188. 93 


School Loans Interest 


50, 153.7! 


Gasoline & Oils 


173. 33 


Street Const. Bonds Interest 


728. oi 


Wages, Maint. of School Grounds 


5, 178. 80 


Authentication & Prep, of Bonds 


2, 350. 0( 


School Grounds, Maint. 


1, 099. 87 




77, 753. i: 




109, 516. 50 


MATURING DEBT: 


•< 


Vocational Training: 




Water Bonds 


41, 500. 00| 


Tuition Fees 


4, 170. 02 


Fire/Police Bldg, 


5, 000, 00 


Travel Reimbursements 


598. 25 


School Bonds 


120, 000.00 




4, 768. 27 


Street Const. Bonds 


8, 000, OOl 



174, 500, 00 



136 



526.32 Reserve Fund 9,954.36 

,500.00 Memorial Day 639.00 

776. 09 Lease of Quarters, American Legion, 

V.F. W. & D.A.V." 2,250.00 

82. 00 

4-H Town Committee 100.00 

384. 40 

Urban Renewal in Wilmington 32. 11 



137 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1958 



ASSETS 



Cash 

Petty Cash Advances 
Returned Checks 



$ 788, 815. 1 1 
362. 55 
334. 00 



Accounts Receivable: 
Uncollected Taxes: 
Prior Years' Levy 

Poll Taxes 44. 00 

Personal Property Taxes 748.89 
Real Estate Taxes 10, 655. 54 

Current Levy 

Poll Taxes 200. 00 

Personal Property Taxes 4,945.05 
Real Estate Taxes 76, 044. 16 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 

Prior Years' Levy 2,680.05 
Current Year's Levy 19, 859. 98 

Farm Excise Tax, Current Levy 
Apportioned Water Assessments -Added to Teixes 
Apportioned St. Assessments -Adder" to Taxes 
Committed Interest Added to Taxes - ^Vater 
Committed Interest Added to Taxes - Street 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 
General Relief 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Old Age Assistance 
Water Department: 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Water Liens 

1956 Levy 20. 27 

1957 Levy 107. 00 

1958 Levy 1, 005. 73 
Unapportioned Water Betterments 
Unapportioned Street Betterments 

Aid to Highways -State & County: 
County Aid-Chapter 90 
State Aid-Chapter 81 & Chapter 90 
Due from Water Department Receipts 
Due from Chap. 90 Const. /Accts. Rec. 

Unprovided/Overdrawn Accounts: 
Overlay Deficit: 

Levy 1937, 1938, 1939 

Levy 1940, 1941, 1942 

Levy 1943, 1944, 1945 

Levy 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949 

Levy 1950 

Levy 1951 

Levy 1952 

Levy 1953 

Levy 1955 

Levy 1956 

Levy 1957 

Levy 1958 

Legal Settlements Paid 
Overdrafts, Appropriations 

Underestimates/State & County Asse ssments: 

County Hospital Assessments 

County Tax Assessments 
Due from Trust Funds 

Carter Lecture Fund 
Due from School Lunch Program 
Loans Authorized 



11, 448. 43 



81, 189.21 



22, 540. 03 
37.45 



310. 
422. 



94 

32 



293. 24 
326. 27 
30, 873. 99 
1 1, 331. 06 

2, 375. 93 

3, 196. 70 
870. 44 



12, 744, 
2, 326. 



16 
17 



1, 133. 00 
43, 679. 21 
20, 551. 97 



7, 500. 00 
29, 994. 03 



12. 36 
12. 30 
12. 28 
89.00 
63. 00 
60.75 
76. 16 
44.85 
189. 86 
291. 27 
1, 876. 61 
7, 960. 69 



3, 612. 94 
33. 57 



1 15, 215. 12 
733. 26 
619.51 
42,205.05 

6, 443. 07 



16, 203. 33 
64,231. 18 

37,494.03 



10, 689. 13 
1, 310.00 
15, 065. 69 



3, 646. 51 

346. 00 
1, 609. 32 



283. 144. 55 
10, 486. 89 
6, 753. 08 



32,666. 65 
260, 000. 00 
$1, 382, 562. 83 



138 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1958 



LIABILITIES &t RESERVES 

Temporary Loans/Anticipation Reimbursement 39,975. 00 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 1, 127. 26 

Selectmen's Land Sales 5,266.60 

Dog LiitEnses Due County 50.00 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 3, 190. 00 

Premium - Sale of Bonds 1,078. 13 

Accrued Interest - Sale of Bonds 5, 998. 51 

Road Machinery Fund Account 1,680.25 

Overestimated/State Park As se ssments 42.07 

High School Athletic Association 1, 742. 85 

Tax Possession - Duplicate Sales 201.74 

Redemption of Assigned Tax Titles 51.81 

Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 179.91 

Recoveries - Old Age Assistance 2,271.24 
Federal Grants: 

Aid to Dependent Children - Aid 720. 11 

Aid to Dependent Children - Adminis-ration 664. 29 1, 384.40 
Old Age Assistance - Assistance 1, 777. 33 

Old Age Assistance - Administration 6,217.54 7,994.87 
Disability Assistance - Assistance 40.75 

Disability Assistance - Administration 171. 89 212.64 

George Barden Fund 229. 09 9,821.00 
Agency Accounts; 

Blue Cross /Shield Deductions 8. 30 

Group Life Insurance Account 1, 172. 95 1,181.25 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 362.55 
Revenue Reserved until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 22, 540. 03 

Tax Title & Possession Revenue 42,205.05 

Departmental Revenue 6,443.07 

Water Revenue 16,203.33 

Special Assessments Revenue 65, 583. 95 

Farm Animal Excise Revenue 37. 45 153,012.88 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 6. 37 

Overlay - Levy 1954 25.64 
Appropriation Accounts: 
Revenue General: 

Town Manager Account 4. 50 

Town Hall Account 16. 00 

Civil Defense 496. 54 

Board of Appeals 2. 50 

Improving Town Common 100. 00 

Construct Fairmeadow Road 9,062. 17 

Purchase New Aerial Ladder Truck 37,986.00 

Construct New Police Station 4,875.50 

Health & Sanitation 25.00 

Welfare Administration 31. 50 

Addit. School Accom. Committee 1,045.19 

School Operating Plants 98. 72 

Tax Title b Legal Assistance 592.01 

Non Revenue: Public Sewer Mains 5, 778. 88 

Street Betterments 1958 5, 965. 39 

Water Betterments 1958 10, 166. 17 

Water Betterments 1957 7, 535.29 

West Street Extension 1955 8. 35 

Water Improvements /Barrows Wellfield 3,326. 82 

Construct New Water Standpipe 59,743.81 

Addit. & Alter. Jr/Sr High School 157, 239.64 

Construct Athletic Field 4,036.61 

Construct Glen Road School 405,004.49 

Construct Wildwood School 5,299.55 

Construct Fire /Police Building 300.18 718,740.84 

Water Available Surplus 7,618.71 

Loans Authorized & Unissued 260,000.00 

Surplus Revenue 168,938.22 

$1, 382. 562. 83 



139 



MEN 



WORKING 



Miiiiiciiial Snapshots 



Building By-Law Committee: left to 
right. Garnet S. Mills, E. Hayward Bliss, 
Roland I. Wood, Raymond F, Fitzmaurice 





Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
in joint meeting: left to right, Selectmen 
Donald Kidder and Frank Hagerty, Finance 
Committee members, Robert Michelson, 
John Brooks, William Curtin, Neil Joyce, 
Frank Stevens, Select. Mrs. Wavie Drew. 



Planning Board Holds A Hearing: left to 
right, William Irwin, Howard Woolaver, 
Mrs. S. Stanley, Daniel Gillis Chairman, 
Robert Evans, John Tobey, William Beers 



140 



o 

Municipal Snapsliots 





SUMMER AND WINTER WORK GOES ON 

142 




a[nuin of OTilmington, MaBaacljuscttfi 

FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



Main and Church Su. 
Main St and Middlesex 
Ave. 

Main and Clark SU. 
Waihington Ave. 
Clark St and Railroad 
Ave. 

Main St and Bridge 
Lane 

Brand Ave. and Wiier St 
Baker St and Taplin 
Ave. 

Philip* Ave. and Wild 

St 

Main St and 
Ma«s'achusett« Ave. 
Main and Hamden SU. 
Hamden St and Glen Rd. 
Glen and Miller Rd*. 
Glen Rd. and Jone» Ave. 
Main St and Grove Ave. 
Grove Ave. and 
CotUge St 

Mildred Roger* School 
Grove Ave. and Winchell 
Rd. 

I Grove Ave. and Lake St 
Main and Lake SU. 

I Fitz Terr. 

I Warren Rd. 

1 Main St and Fairfield 
Rd. 

I Fairfield and Faulkner 
Rd*. 

I Main St Tewksbury 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Shawfheen Rd. 
Shawsheen Ave.- and 
Grand St 

Grand and Birch St*. 
Shawsheen and Nas*au 
Ave*. 

Nassau Ave. and Dutton 
Rd. 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Carter Lane 
Shawsheen Ave. and 
Aldrich Rd. 

Aldrich Rd. and HarcUn 
St 

Aldrich Rd. and Boutwell 

St 

Aldrich Rd. and Forest 

St 

Aldrich Rd. and Win*ton 
St 

Aldrich Rd. Billerica 
Line 

Shawtheen Ave. 
Cranberry Bog. 
Shawsheen Ave. and 
Bond St 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Hopkins St 

Hopkins St Billerica 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Nichols St 



1385 Nichols St Billerica 
Line 

139 Shawsheen Ave. 
Billerica Line 

211 Burlington Ave. and 
Harris St 

2112 Cedar St and Burt Rd. 
2114 Ceder St and Oak Ct 

212 Burlington Ave. and 
Chestnut St 

2122 Chestnut St and Butters 
Row 

2124 Chestnut St and Mill Rd. 

2125 Mill Rd. Burlington Line 

2127 Chestnut St and Hillside 
Way 

2128 Hillside Way Burlington 
Line 

2129 Chestnut St Wobum 
Line 

2133 Marion and Clifton Sts. 
2136 Marion St (Between 

Clifton and Chestnut 

Sts.) 

214 Burlington Ave. and 
Boutwell St 

2141 Boutwell St. and Taft Rd. 

2142 Boutwell St and 
Roosevelt Rd. 

215 Burlington Ave. and 
Swain Rd. 

2151 Swain and Taft Rds. 

216 Burlington Ave. and 

Beach St 

217 Burlington Ave. and 
Forest St 

2171 Forest St and Swain Rd. 
2173 Forest St and Pershing 
Rd. 

311 Main and Lowell Sts. 

312 Main St and Butters 
Row. 

3121 Butters Row (Between 
Chestnut St. and Main 
St) 

313 Memorial Park 

314 Greer Company 

315 Main and Eames Sts. 

3151 Eames St R.R. Crossing 

3152 Raffi & Swanson Co. 

316 Main St and Cook Avt. 

317 Main St Woburn Line 
32 Lowell and Parker Sto. 

3212 Parker and Blackstone 

Su. 

321 Lowell and Cross Sts. 

322 Lowell and Bay Sts. 

3231 Wobum and Elm Sts. 

3232 Woburn St and 
Brentwood Ave. 

3233 Woburn St and Morse 
Ave. 

3234 Wobxmn and Eames Sts. 

3235 Wobum St Wobum 
Line 

324 Lowell and West Sts. 

3241 West St. and Westdale 
Ave. 

3242 West and Grove SU. 



3243 Grove St. Reading Line 

3244 West St and Suncrest 
Ave. 

3245 West St Reading Line 
325 Lowell St Reading Line 

41 Church St Fire House 

42 Church and Columbia 

Sts. 

43 Church and Beacon Sts. 

431 Walker School 

432 Beacon St and Fairview 
Ave. 

433 Fairview Ave. and 
Adams St. Ext. 

44 ChXirch and Clark SU. 
441 Clark St and Middlesex 

Ave. 

45 Church St and Thurston 
Ave. 

46 Church and Adams Sts. 

461 Middlesex Ave. and 
Adams St 

462 Adams St. and Adams 
St Ext 

47 Senior High School 

48 Church St and 
Middlesex Ave. 

481 School St. and Junior 
High School 

482 Buzzell School 

483 Center School 

51 Middlesex Ave. and 
Wildwood St 
511 Wildwood St (Near 
A. S. Hudson) 

512 Wildwood St (Near Vet*. 
Housing) 

513 Wildwood and Woburn 
Sts. 

521 Glendale Circle 

522 Glen Rd. R. R. Crossing 

525 Glen Rd. and King St 
5253 King and Bartlett Sts. 

526 Glen Rd. and St Paul St 

53 Middlesex Ave. Town 
Hall 

54 Middlesex Ave. and 
Federal St 

541 Federal and Concord 
Sts. 

5412 Concord and Woburn 
Sts. 

5413 Woburn St (Near 
A. S. Eames) 

5414 Concord St No. Reading 
Line 

542 Federal and Grant Sts. 
544 Federal and Lincoln St*. 

546 Federal and Liberty SU. 

547 Wobum and Federal 
Sts. 

548 Woburn and West Sto. 

55 Middlesex and Mystic 
Aves. 

56 C. S. Harriman Tannery 

57 Whitefield School 

571 Shady Lane Drive and 
Oakdale Rd. 



572 Shady Lane Drive and 
Lawrence St. 

58 Middlesex Ave. and 
North St 

581 North St (Between 
Middlesex Ave. and 
Dadant Drive) 

59 Middlesex Ave. and 
High St 

591 High and Wobum Su. 

592 Woburn and Park SU. 

593 Park and Gowing Sts. 

594 Park St No. Reading 
Line 

61 Middlesex Ave. and 
Salem St 

62 Salem St R. R. 
Crossing (Portland) 

63 Salem St R. R. 
Crossing (Lawrence) 

64 Salem and Cunningham 
Sts. 

65 Salem St and Silver 
Lake Rd. 

651 McDonald Rd. 

67 Salem St. Tewksbury 
Line 

68 Salem and Ballardvale 
Sto. 

681 Ballardvale St. (Near 
R. R. Bridge) 

682 Ballardvale St (Near 
Friends Farm) 

683 Ballardvale St. (Near 
Thomas Merely) 

684 Ballardvale St. Andover 
Line 

69 Salem and Andover Sts. 

691 Andover and Wobum 
St*. 

692 Andover St. and Upton 
Ct 

693 Andover St (Near 
T. C Daley) 

694 Andover St Andover 
Line 

71 Salem and Wobum Sts. 
711 Woburn St and 

Hathaway Rd. 
714 Hathaway and Sheridan 
Rd*. 

72 Salem St Town Dump 

73 Salem St. No. Reading 
Line 

2 All Out 

22 No School (7:00 & 7:15 
AM.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Special Call 

7 Police Call 

8 Boy Scout* 
10 Out of Town 

666 Civil Defense 

EMERGENCY FIRE 8-3200 
BUSINESS TEL. 8-3346 



FIRE 



K.""^ 8-3331 





at 



your 



service 



FOR INFORMATION ON: 


CA LL 


DFPARTMENT- 


Aid to Dependent Children 


8 -22 1 1 


We If a. re Depa.r tment 


Asses sme nts 


8-3314 


B oa.rd of Assessors 


Hills and Accounts 


8-3313 


Town Accountant 


Birth Certificates 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Board of Selectmen 


8-3314 


Clerk of Board 


— T .a \Jl/ c 
u y l^dW B 


8-3312 


' I " /-\ 11/ 1 ^ T* If 


Ce me te r y 


8 - 390 1 


Ceme te r y De par tme nt 


Civilian Defense 


8-3556 


Director of Civil IDeferise 


Civilian Defense 


8-807 1 


He adc^ua r te r s 


Complaints (general) 


8-3311 


Town Nlanage r 




O - J J 1 o 






ft ^ 1 




Dead Animal Removal 


8 - 3770 


Dog Officer 


Death Certificates 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Fngineering 


8-3311 


Fngineer 


Flections 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


T*^ 1^ 1 r»Arm *i n f Town 
iLiiiuiuyiiiciitj xvjwLi 


ft 1 1 


T" \A a n 3 fj f> T" 


F n te r tainm e n t Permits 


8-3314 


Board of Selectmen 




8 - 3200 


Fire Depar tme nt 




ft ^ 1 ^ 




Fuel Oil Storage 


ft ^ 'lAk 
o - J j'tD 


F ire De par tm e n t 


Garbage Collection 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Health (general) 


8-3313 


Board of Health 


Immunization Clinics 


8-331 3 


Board of Health 


Legal Matters 


8-2026 


, Town Counsel 


Library 


8-2967 


Public Library 


Licenses and Permits 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Maps (official) 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Milk Inspection 


8-331 3 


Health Department 


Old Age Assistance 


8-221 1 


Welfare Department 


Parks and Playgrounds 


8-3901 


Cemetery Department 


Planning Board 


8-331 1 


Agent (Town Fngineer) 


Police 


8-3331 


Police Department 


Property (Town Owned) 


8-3314 


Board of Selectmen 


Property (Tax Title) 


8-331 3 


Town Treasurer 


Purchasing 


8-3313 


^ Purchasing Clerk 


Recreation Program 


8-2052 


Director of Recreation 


Schools 


8-2052 


Superintendent of Schools 


Sewage Permits 


8-331 3 


Board of Health 


Street Lights 


8-3311 


Town Manager 


Street Maintenance 


8-4481 


Highway Department 


Taxes 


8-3314 


Board of Assessors 


Tax Collection 


8-3312 


Tax CoUactor 


Tree s 


8-2809 


Tree Warden 


Veterans' Benefits 


8-2994 


Veterans' Agent 


Veterans' Housing 


8-3313 


Housing Authority 


Veterans' Services 


8-2994 


Veterans' Agent 


Vital Statistics 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Voting, Registration, etc. 


8-3312 


Registrars of Voters 


Water 


8-4711 


Water Department 1 


Welfare, Public 


8-2211 


Welfare Department 1 


Wire Inspection 


8-3313 


Building Inspector 1 


Zoning 


8-3313 


Building Inspector 1 



Annual Re 





TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
Massachusetts 



HOW WILMINGTON'S TAX RATE COMPARES WITH OTHER TOWNS 


TOWN 


1950 


1959 


INCREASE IN TAX RATES 1950-1959 


\A/II hJI 1 Klt^TDhl 


DO. Uiy 


OH.yJU 


ma. uum 


NORTH AN DOVER 


43.00 


54.00 


NATICK 


45.60 


60.00 


■■ I4.40~H^H 


READING 


43.00 


60.00 


Hi 17.00 MHH 


STONEHAM 


50.00 


67. 00 


^■IJT^OO^^^H 


BEDFORD 


50.00 


68.00 


18.00 


NEEDHAM 


38.00 


56.00 


18.00 


DANVERS 


49.00 


68.00 


HBHl 19.00 


LEXINGTON 


43.00 


63.00 


■^^^B ZO.OO^^HI 


BRAINTREE 


44.00 


65.60 


^^^^H 21.60 HiB 


WAYLAND 


49.00 


71.00 


^^^^^H 22.00 


CHELMSFORD 


53.00 


78.00 


^^^HIH 25.00 


SAUGUS 


41.00 


71.60 


^^^^^BV 30.60 ^^^^^H 


CONCORD 


53.00 


86.80 


^Hi^^HH 33.80 ^^H^HB 


TEWKSBURY 


40.00 


89.00 




BILLERICA 


34.00 


93.40 













TAX RATE ANALYSIS 



195 1935 1956 1957 1958 1959 

Assessed Valuation 7,865,913.00 13,248,383.00 15,341,686.00 16,774,982.00 19,228,670.00 23,855,002.25 

Tax Levy 440,491.13 741,909.45 895,593.73 1,059,522.87 1,275,344.22 1,533,156.14 

Ta.K Rate 56.00 56.00 58.00 62.80 66.00 64.00 

Net Cost from Taxes: 



Schools 135,293.70 355,530.99 469,616.09 585,822.89 650,71 1.00 804,669.00. 

Town Government 275,723.43 367,005.03 405,782.67 447,569.02 599,247.66 692,625.92 

State, County Agencies 2 8, 474. 00 19, 373. 43 20, 194. 98 26, 130. 96 2 5, 385. 56 35, 931. 61 

TOTAL TAX LEVY 440,491.13 741,909.45 895,593.73 1,059,522.87 1,275,344.22 1,533,226.53 



School Tax Rate 

Town Tax Rate 

State, County Tax Rate 

TOTAL TAX RATE 



17. 20 (30. 7%) 26. 83 

35. 20 (63. 0%) 27. 72 

3. 60 ( 6. 3%) 1. 45 

$56.00 $56.00 



(47. 9%) 30. 61 (52. 3%) 
(49. 5%) 26. 07 (45. 9%) 
( 2. 6%) 1. 32 ( 2. 3%) 

$58. 00 



34. 75 (55. 0%) 33. 68 

26. 50 (42. 6%) 31.01 

1. 55 ( 2. 4%) 1.31 

$62.80 $66.00 



(51. 02%) 33. 59 (52. 49%) 
(46. 99%) 28. 91 (45. 17%) 
( 1. 99%) 1. 50 ( 2. 34%) 

$64. 00 



INDEX 



Page 



Letter of Transmittal 2 

Board of Selectmen - 1959 3 

Progress - 1959 4 

The Job Ahead 5 

Directory of Officials 6 

Boards, Committees, and Commissions 8 

Town Manager 9 

Board of Selectmen 10 

Board of Assessors IZ 

Town Treasurer 15 

Town Collector 16 

Town Clerk 18 

Registrars of Voters 19 

Building By-Law Committee 19 

Town Counsel 20 

Planning Board 24 

Town Engineer 27 

Board of Appeals 28 

Building Inspector 32 

Veterans Agent 33 

Police Department 34 

Tree Department 37 

Fire Department 38 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 39 

Water Department 40 

Constable 41 

Permanent Building Committee 42 

Highway Department 47 

Board of Health 50 

Board of Public Welfare 56 

School Maintenance Department 59 

Board of Library Trustees 62 

Recreation Commission 63 

Jury List 64 

Dog Officer 66 

Animal Inspector 66 

Board of Cemetery Commissioners 67 

Accepted Streets 68 

Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund 75 

Housing Authority 76 

Annual Town Meeting - March 1959 79 

Special Town Meeting - July 1959 92 

Special Town Meeting - August 1959 96 

Warrant, Annual Town Meeting - I960 97 

Town Accountant 105 

Summary Report - Capital Budget Program 125 

Future Requirements for Schools & Recreation 134 



Town of Wilmington 

Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The Board of Selectmen submit the following report for the year ending December 31, 1959. 

We have been operating nine years under the Selectmen-Town Manager form of government. 
However, there still seems to be misunderstanding on the part of many citizens relative to the 
respective responsibilities of the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager. 

The Town itself can be likened to a large private corporation with the registered voters being 
the shareholders of the corporation. The registered voters, as shareholders of the corporation, 
elect the Board of Selectmen who act in the nature of a Board of Directors of the corporation. 

This IJ/oard in turn appoints a General Manager - in this case called a Town Manager. The 
Selectmen are the policy-making group, and the Town Manager is the administrative official 
who carries out the policies and who is responsible to the Selectmen. The Selectmen can in- 
form the Town Manager of the services which the people should have, but they cannot tell him 
how to carry out the functions, because by law the administration of services is the sole re- 
sponsibility of the Town Manager. 

It is hoped the foregoing explanation will help to clarify the respective functions and respon- 
sibilities of the Board of Selectmen in relation to the Town Manager. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Board of Selectmen 

Donald C. Kidder, Chairman 
Charles H. Black 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Wavie M. Drew 
Francis J. Hagerty 



2 




3 



progress 



construction of new Public Works Garage, 
construction of Glen Road Elementary School, 
construction of new Police Station. 

Town Meeting voted overwhelmingly to retain Town Manager form of government. 
Planning Board completed program of renaming streets. 

industrial expansion continues with completion of Avco, Terrell Corporation and Dragon Cement. 

construction of new Wilmington Plaza Shopping Center, Professional Building on Main Street, 
North Wilmington Post Office and North Wilmington Drug Store. 

constructed Longview Road, Hilltop Road, Ledgewood Road, Fairmeadow Road and Shady Lane Drive 

drainage on Shaw sheen Road, Burlington Avenue ,' Lockwood Road and Oakdale Road. 

resurfaced fifteen miles of streets. 

completed Park Street. 

personnel committee appointed. 

over $1, 000, 000 of new assessed valuation. 

elderly project completed with forty individual apartments. 

initiated sanitary landfill operation for disposal of rubbish. 

completed landscaping of the Town Common. 



4 



the job ahead 



WHAT W K WJLJ^M F'®ffi TT HE K ff" W T HIT M K 



.continue efforts to attract new industry. 

.initiate program for our police officers to receive proper training at State Police Academy. 

. set-up our own public health laboratory. 

. develop sidewalk program. 

. initiate tree planting program. 

. reconstruct and widen Ballardvale Street. 

.initiate and develop municipal owned and operated sanitary landfill operation for disposal of rubbish. 

. develop program for proper street lighting. 

. continue our expanded street program. 

. complete Boutwell Street School by September I960. 

.continue procedure to correct street drainage problems. 

.mechanize town bookkeeping system. 

. develop wells at new wellfield site. 

.increase facilities at Silver Lake. 

. continue with personnel by-law study. 

.improve facilities at Town Park. 

. adopt revised building code. 

.provide new Town Hall facilities. 



5 



ED II ffi K C T © ffi "W ©F" 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Donald C. Kidder, Chairman 
Charles H. Black 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Wavie M. Drew 
Francis J. Hagerty 
Olive M. Sheldon, Clerk 



Term 
Expire s 

1960 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1962 



TOWN MANAGER 



Cecil O. Lancaster 



TOWN MODERATOR 



Simon Cutter 



(annually) 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Edward F. Page, Chairman 
Arthur V. Lynch, Secretary 
Ernest M. Crispo 
John F. Hartnett 
Frederic P. Melzar 
Henry Sullivan 



1962 
1962 
I960 
I960 
1960 
1961 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



John J. Collins 



U. S. SENATORS: 



Leverett Saltonstall of Dover 
John Kennedy of Boston 



U. S. REPRESENTATIVE: 



Edith Nourse Rogers of Lowell 



STATE SENATOR: 



James Madden of Lexington 

7th Middlesex District 

20 Pemberton Square, Boston 



STATE REPRESENTATIVES: 



Frank Tanner 

18th Middlesex District 

26 Mineral Street, Reading 



Thomas Donahue 

18 Middlesex District 

75 Pine Street, Woburn 



6 



Accountant 


Robert H. Peters 


Animal Inspector 


Leo E. LeBlanc 


Building Inspector 


Minot J. Anderson 


Cemetery Superintendent 


Francis Downs 


Civil Defense Director 


Rene J. LaRivee 


Constable 


A. John Imbimbo 


Director of Public Welfare 


Andrew P. Ring 


Dog Officer 


Leo E. LeBlanc 


Engineer 


Alphonse Savignac 


Fire Chief 


Arthur J. Boudreau 


Health Agent &j Sanitarian 


Patrick A. Thibeau 


Highway Superintendent 


James H. White 


Librarian 


Clara P. Chipman 


Medical Agent, Board of Health 


Gerald A. Fagan, M. D 


Milk Inspector 


Patrick A. Thibeau 


Moth Superintendent 


John W. Babine 


Nurse, Public Health 


Ann Butters, R. N. 


Nurse, School 


Arline Halpin, R. N. 


Nurse, School (Assistant) 


Sylvia Levine, R. N. 


Physician, Schools 


Ernest C. MacDougall, M. D. 


Plvunbing Inspector 


Herbert W. Pickering 


Police Chief 


Paul J. Lynch 


Public Weigher 


Joseph F. Lyons 


Public Weigher 


A. Osterman 


Public Weigher 


W. Staveley 


Public Weigher 


L. Cutcliff 


Sealer Weights & Measures 


Daniel P. Pike 


Slaughtering Inspector 


Leo E. LeBlanc 


Town Clerk 


Esther L. Russell 


Town Clerk (Assistant) 


Sylvia Stanley 


Town Collector 


Miriam H. Ware 


Town Counsel 


Philip B. Buzzell 


Town Treasurer 


Grace H. Tilley 


Tree Warden 


John W. Babine 


Veterans Agent 


Arthur Harper 


Veterans Grave Officer 


Guy E. Nichols 


Water Superintendent 


Edmund H. Sargent 


Wire Inspector 


Charles Webster 



AlOWISOMT C dDM M II T T K E S T© THE T © W ISI M A. M A. €S E ffi 



BUILDING BY-LAW 

Roland Woods, Chairman 
E. Hayward Bliss 
Ray Fitzmaurice 
Garnet Mills 



INSURANCE ADVISORY 

Augustus T. Norton 
Joseph J. Slater 
Howard A. Woolaver 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY 

John Brooks, Chairman 
Albert Blackburn, Jr. 
Paul Duggan 
Carl Gubellini 
Frank Stevens 



7 






Term 




Term 


APPEAL-, BOARD OF 


Expir e s 


LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


Expire 


Walter A. Lawler 


1960 


Frankline E. Allen, Chairman 


1961 


Louis E. Gage 


1961 


Philip B. Buzzell 


1960 


AlmericoT. DiCampo 


1962 


Elizabeth N. Neilson 


I960 


Anthony Joannides (Associate) 


1960 


Evelyn Norton 


1961 


Henry R. Hesse (Associate) 


1960 


May Hadley 


1962 


Bruce MacDonald (Associate) 


I960 


Esther B. Hall 


1962 


Walter L. Hale, Jr. (Resigned) 








A. Lloyd Laffin (Resigned) 




PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
ErwinHanke, Chairman 
Paul H. Niles, Secretary 


1960 
1960 


ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 




Raymond G. McClure 


1961 


Stanley Webber, Principal Assessor 




Vincent R. McLain 


1961 


Olive M. Sheldon 




Joseph F. Courtney 


1962 


Minot J. Anderson 




PLANNING BOARD 

A. Daniel Gillis, Chairman 


1964 


CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 




William A. Beers, Secretary 


1963 


Alice M. Allen 


1960 


John R. Evans 


1960 


Guy E. Nichols 


1961 


Joseph Slater 


1961 


Mildred E. Neilson 


1962 


Howard C. Woolaver 


1962 


Helen P. Hayward 


1963 


Raymond Fitzmaurice 


1962 


Madelon C. Slater 


1964 


Herbert Nickerson 

John P. Tobey (Resigned) 


1964 


CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 








Guy E. Nichols, Chairman 


1960 


RECREATION COMMISSION 




William F. Cavanaugh 


1961 


Maybelle A. Bliss, Chairman 




Joseph B. McMahon 


1962 


Lawrence H. Gushing, Director 
Carl A. Backman 
Donald F. Hebsch 




FINANCE COMMITTEE 




Edward M. Nichols 




Herbert C. Barrows, Honorary for Life 




Norbert L. Sell 




William P. Curtin, Chairman 


1961 


David I. Elfman (Resigned) 




Robert B. Michelson, Secretary 


1960 






Ralph M. Kelmon 


1960 


REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 




Frank P. Stevens 


I960 


Joseph P. Ring, Chairman 


1961 


Cornelius F. Joyce 


1961 


F. Talbot Emery 


1960 


William A. Stickney 


1961 


Phyllis O'Leary 


1962 


John G. Hayward 


1962 


Esther L. Russell, Clerk 




John Brooks 


1962 






Dr. John P. Silvers 


1962 


TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Philip B. Buzzell, Chairman 
Harold E. Melzar 


1960 
1961 


HEALTH, BOARD OF 




Edward M. Neilson 


1962 


Augustus C. Walker, Chairman 


1962 






Vinal E. Lewis 


1960 


WATER COMMISSIONERS, BOARD OF 




Marion C. Boylen 


1961 


Harold E. Meizar, Chairman 
Waldo A. Stevens 


I960 
1961 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 




Arnold C. Blake 


1962 


Ernest B. Rice, Chairman 


1960 






William F. Smith, Treasurer 


1961 


WELFARE, BOARD OF PUBLIC 




James P. Donahue, Asst. Treas. 


1962 


Maurice D. O'Neil, Chairman 




Frank H. McLean, Secretary 


1963 


Florence A. Balkus 




Alan E. Fenton, State Member 


1963 


Anna M. Low 


1961 


James W. Franklin, Executive Secretary 




Andrew P. Ring, Director & Secretary 





8 





TOWN MANAGER 
Cecil O. Lancaster 



Secretary, Mary E. Denault 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 



It is with sincere pleasure that I present this 1959 Annual Report of the Town of Wilmington covering the 



Although I have been in Wilmington only a few months, it is very obvious due to the foresight of your town 
officials, past and present, that Wilmington is considered to be one of the most progressive communities 



We are very fortunate indeed to have the dedicated and civic-minded citizens who serve on our various 
boards and commissions, giving freely of their time so that the town may benefit from their advice, 
knowledge, and services. 

I should like to take this opportunity to express my deep appreciation and sincere thanks to the citizens 
of Wilmington and members of the official family for the cooperation, kindness, and support they have 
given me during my first few months of office^* and to the department heads and employees of the town 
for the excellent job they are doing in performing the mission of the organization. 



ninth year of operation under the Town Manager form of government. 



in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Cecil O. Lancaster 
Town Manager 



9 



board of selectmen 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

Following the re-election of Mrs. Wavie M. Drew and Mr. Francis J. Hagerty, the Board was organized 
with Mr. Donald C. Kidder as Chairman. 

On June 29, 1959, Town Manager Alfred Calabrese submitted his resignation to be effective July 24, 1959. 
Mr. Patrick A. Thibeau and Mr. Stanley Webber both served for a short time as Temporary Town Managers 
performing the additional duties incurred as Temporary Town Managers to the complete satisfaction of the 
Board. We express our appreciation and thanks to both these men. 

Your Board of Selectmen was in complete agreement that an early appointment of a Town Manager would 
best serve the interests of the Town. Drawing heavily on the considerable time which had been spent less 
than a year previous in interviewing candidates, Mr. Cecil O. Lancaster was elected Town Manager on 
July 13, 1959 for a three-year term. 

During the past year the Board of Selectmen have met regularly and attended joint meetings with almost ever 
other board and group in the Town so that we might be better informed. 

The following actions of the Board are directed to the attention of the townspeople: 

On his appointment as Honorary Chairman of the Finance Committee for life, we 
presented Mr. Herbert C. Barrows an "Award of Merit" for his sixty-five (65) 
years of devotion and service to the Town of Wilmington. 

The discontinuance of passenger service on the North Wilmington R. R. line was 
protested by every means available to your Board. 

a. We have been successful in securing automatic gates for the Main 
Street grade crossing brought about by this change. 

b. We have petitioned for automatic gates at Glen Road and Clark Street. 

We have requested the Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway to extend their service j 
into additional sections of our Town. 

Petitioned the County Commissioners for the relocation of Glen Road, Concord 
Street and Ballardvale Street. 

Proposed to the State Department of Public Works that consideration be given •• { 

to the widening of Route 38 (Main Street). 

Supported and gave direction to safety devices and fire protection measures for 
our school buildings. 

The Board has met a number of times with the Wilmington Housing Authority regarding our Urban Renewal 
program. Our Chairman and Town Manager attended a conference in New York last October with the mem- 1 
bers of the authority. 



10 



A large amount of our time was spent in enforcing and supplementing our gravel regulations by special 
meeting and state legislation to prevent the ruining of valuable land by the removal of gravel for Inter -State 
Route 93. The Board also spent considerable time with district state engineers during the year to assure 
us that as the highway neared completion the Town's bests interests were protected. 

The dedication of AVCO in May attended by the Board, State, and National dignitaries followed by the 

building of the DeMoulas Shopping Center, the Professional Building, North Wilmington Pharmacy, Dragon 

Cement, Terrell Corporation and two additions, one to Unit Packet and the other to Charles River 

Laboratory emphasize the importance that the Board and Town Manager place on the need in a growing 

and expanding community for industry to locate in our Town and thereby help us to maintain a stabilized tax 
rate . 

We express our appreciation to the Town Manager and all Town Employees for their devotion to duty and 
continued cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald C. Kidder, Chairman 
Charles H. Black 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Wavie M. Drew 
Francis J. Hagerty 

WILMINGTONS 1959 BUDGET 



INCOME EXPENSES 




Includes - Protection of Persons ft Property, PuUic Works, 

Oeneral Govt., Heolth a Sanitation, Library 8t Recr. 

1 1 



board of assessors 



PRINCIPAL ASSESSOR 
Stanley Webber 




TOWN OWNED PROPERTY 



Equipment Total 



Water Department - 243 acres Land and Buildings 


129, 910 


15, 000 


144, 910 


Schools - Land and Buildings 


2, 672, 250 


160, 000 


2, 832, 250 


Parks and Playgrounds - 52 acres of Land 


36, 660 


1, 000 


37, 660 


Town Hall - 16, 120 sq. ft. Land and Building 


25, 540 


12, 500 


38, 040 


Library - Land and Building 


4, 860 


3, 000 


7, 860 


Cemetery - Land and Building 


46, 660 


2, 000 


48, 660 


Fire/Police Station - Land and Building 


61, 800 


31, 700 


93, 500 


Tree Warden and Moth Dept. - Land and Building 


3, 680 


5, 500 


9, 180 


Highway Department - Land and Building 


7, 280 


19, 500 


26, 780 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 




1, 300 


1, 300 


Welfare Department 




1, 100 


1 , 100 


Engineering Department 




2, 500 


2, 500 


TOTAL 


$ 2, 988, 640 


$255, 100 


$3, 243,740 



12 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES FOR WILMINGTON 
OF POLLS, PROPERTY AND TAXES, AS ASSESSED 
JANUARY 1, 1959 



Compiled from the figures entered in the Valuation List: 



Number of Persons Assessed: 



Individuals 
28 
3764 
219 



On Personal Estate Only 
On Real Estate Only 
On Both Personal and Real Estate 
Total Number of Persons Assessed 
Total Number of Polls Assessed 

Value of Assessed Peronal Estate: 
Stock in Trade 
Machinery 
Live Stock 

All Other Tangible Personal Property 
Total Value of Assessed Personal Property 

Value of Assessed Real Estate: 

Land exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings exclusive of Land 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Total Value of Assessed Estate 

Tax Rate per $1 , 000 - $64. 00 

Taxes for State , County and Town purposes, including Overlay : 
On Personal Estate 
On Real Estate 
On Polls 

Total Taxes Assessed 

Number of Livestock Estimated Under Section 36, Chapter 59: 
Horses (1 year old or over) 
Neat Cattle (1 year old or over) 

Cows (Milch) 
Bulls 1, Oxen 0, Yearlings: steers 2, heifers 5 
Swine (6 months old, or over) 
Sheep (6 months old, or over) 
Fowl 
All Other 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed: 



All 

Other 
7 
86 
17 



Total 



Number of Dwellings Assessed: 



35 
3850 
236 
4121 
3218 



96, 825. 00 
134, 785, 00 

42, 412. 25 
702, 465. 00 

976, 487. 25 



2, 959, 330. 00 
19, 919, 185. 00 

22, 878, 51 5. 00 

23,855, 002. 25 



62, 495. 18 
1 , 464, 224. 96 
6, 436. 00 

1, 533, 156. 14 



59 

21 

8 

112 
4 

925 
50, 854 

10, 340 

3, 143 



13 



RECAPITULATION - 1959 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Tax Title Foreclosures 

Amount necessary to satisfy final court judgments 
Overlay Deficits (Overdrafts) 
Total Deficits (Abatements) 
Pension Fund 

State Parks and Reservations 
State Audit 
County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 
Overlay 

Gross Amount to be Raised 



$1 , 902, 748. 80 
36. 300. 00 
144. 00 
1,310. 00 
15, 065. 69 
10, 819. 48 
16, 931. 01 
3, 914. 01 
3, 854. 24 
16, 985. 93 
11, 177. 49 
49, 961. 42 



1, 939, 048. 80 



130, 163. 27 
2, 069, 212. 07 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 
Income Tax 
Corporation Taxes 

Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 

Old Age Tax (Meals) 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Licenses 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Charitie s 

Old Age Assistance 
Veterans' Services 
Schools 
Libr ar ie s 
Cemeteries 

Interest on Taxes and Assessments 
State Assistance for School Construction 
Farm Animal Excise 
Unclas sified 
Sewer Rental 

Total Estimated Receipts 



146, 576. 39 
15, 070. 78 
64. 13 
2, 326. 09 
130, 000. 00 
4, 000. 00 

4, 000. 00 
4, 500. 00 

5, 500. 00 
2, 500. 00 

19. 000. 00 
37, 000. 00 

6, 000. 00 
28, 000. 00 

500. 00 
3, 900. 00 
4, 400. 00 
77, 176. 47 

200. 00 
5, 000. 00 
4, 000. 00 



499, 713. 86 



Overestimate of previous year (State Parks & Reservations) 
Voted from Available Funds 

Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



42. 07 

36, 300. 00 



36, 342. 07 



536, 055. 93 

1, 533, 156. 14 

2, 069, 212. 07 



Personal Property 976, 487. 25 @ $64. 00 per M 

Real Estate 22,878,515.00 ® 64. 00 per M 

Polls - 3218 2. 00 each 

Total Taxes Levied on Polls and Property 



62, 495. 18 
1, 464, 224. 96 
6, 436. 00 
1, 533, 156. 14 



14 



town treasurer 




TOWN TREASURER 
Mrs. Grace H. Tilley 



Cash in Treasury, January 1, 1959 
Total Receipts, 1959 

Less Payments by Treasury Warrant 
Cash in Treasury January 1, I960 

Department Items of Interest 

Total Personnel 

Collections - Blue Cross /Shield 
Collections - Employees Insurance 

Collections - Employees Retirement (exclusive of School Teachers) 
Collections - Federal Income Tax 
Collections - Mass. State Income Tax 



5 788, 815. 11 

3, 705, 269. 67 

4, 494, 084. 78 
4, 050, 305. 98 

443, 778. 80 



444 

14, 626. 60 
1, 494. 90 
22, 835. 54 
136, 514. 16 
10, 144. 71 



15 



town eolleetor 



TOWN COLLECTOR 
Mrs. Miriam H. Ware 





WATER 


Balance 


Commit . 


Cash 


Tax 


Abate - 




Balance 


LIENS 


12/31/58 


1959 


Collected 


Title 


ment s 


Refunds 


12/31/59 


1956 


20. 27 




20. 


27 














1957 


107.00 




107. 


00 














1958 


1 , 005. 73 




656. 


39 


67. 


54 






281. 


80 


1959 




5, 331. 05 


3, 886. 


18 


107. 


86 




56. 18 


1, 393. 


19 


Total 


1 133. 00 


5 331.05 


4, 669. 


84 


175. 


40 




56. 18 


1, 674. 


99 


BETTERMENTS 






















1958 






















Apport. Street 


422. 32 




263. 


00 


47. 


55 






111. 


77 


Apport. Street 


324. 50 




















Commit. Int. 


1. 77 




209. 


72 


37. 


96 






78. 


59 


Apport. Water 


310. 94 




211. 


68 


14. 


1 1 






85. 


15 


Apport. Water 






















Commit. Int. 


252. 08 




149. 


32 


11. 


24 






91. 


52 


Deferred Water 






















Intere st 


31. 52 




10. 


16 










21. 


36 


Unapport. Water 


24, 365. 24 




2, 426. 


20 








App. 


1959 Tax bills 


1959 






















Water 




47, 330. 49 


2, 887. 


51 










44, 442. 


98 


Apport. Water 




2, 591. 15 


2, 124. 


01 


14. 


07 


6. 03 




447. 


04 


Apport. Water 






















Commit, Int. 




2, 194. 65 


1, 666. 


91 


10. 


68 


15. 56 




501. 


50 


Apport. Street 




1, 079. 57 


810. 


09 


47. 


46 




15. 82 


237. 


84 


Apport. Street 






















Commit. Int. 




775. 88 


575. 


08 


36. 08 




12. 04 


176. 


76 


Apport. Water 






















Paid in advance 




1, 809. 75 


1, 809. 


75 














Apport. Water Int. 






















Paid in advance 




12. 39 


12. 


39 














Apport. Street 






















Paid in advance 




1, 439. 52 


1, 439. 


52 














Apport. St. Interest 




















Paid in advance 




31. 24 


31. 


24 















Total 



25,708.37 57,264.64 



14, 626. 58 219. 15 
16 



Balance not 
21.59 27.86 shown due to 

the fact that betterments are 
apportioned over a period of yrs 



COMMITMENTS IN 1958 



COMMITMENTS IN 1959 



Excise in 1958 




14, 502. 


85 


1958 


Excise in 1959 






4, 817. 


57 


Exci se 




130, 157. 


55 


1959 


Excise 






122, 373. 


59 


Real Estate 




1, 209, 252. 


00 




Real Estate 




1, 465, 194. 


56 


Personal Property 




61, 013. 


37 




Personal Property 






62, 559. 


18 


Poll 




6, 278. 


00 




Poll 






6, 470. 


00 


Farm Excise 




247. 


73 




Farm Excise 






208. 


89 


Water Liens 




4, 854. 


31 




Water Liens 






5, 331. 


05 


Apport. Water Better 




1, 387. 


34 




Apport. Water Betterments 






2, 591. 


15 


Apport. Water Better 


Int. 


827. 


61 




Apport. Water Betterments 


Int. 




2, 194. 


65 


Apport. Water Better. 


Int. (Deferrals) 41. 


16 




Water Betterments 






47, 330. 


49 


Water Betterments 




32, 955. 


01 




Apport. Street Betterments 






1, 079. 


57 


Apport. Street Better 




1, 299. 


21 




Apport. Street Betterments 


Int. 




775. 


88 


Apport. Street Better 


Int. 


965. 


86 




Apport. St. Better. Paid in 


Advance 


1, 439. 


52 


Apport. Street Better 


Paid in 








Apport. St. Better. Int. Pd. m 


Advance 


31. 


24 


Advance 




2, 133. 


67 




Apport. Water Better. Pd. in 


Advance 


1, 809. 


75 


Apport. Street Better 


Inter e st 








Apport. Water Better. Int. Po 


. m 


Adv. 


12. 


39 


Paid in Advance 




8. 


61 














Total Commitments 




1, 465, 924. 28 




Total Commitments 




1, 724, 219. 


48 



Balance Commitment Cash Tax Balance 

12/31/58 1959 Collected Title Abatements Refunds 12/3 1 /59 

1956 



Poll 


4. 00 












4. 


00 










Excise 


453. 73 






63. 


28 




280. 


95 






109. 


50 


Real Estate 


964. 15 






133. 


49 


726. 41 


523. 


45 


474. 


15 


54. 


95 


1957 


























Poll 


40. 00 






6. 


00 




14. 


00 






20. 


00 


Per sonal 


748. 89 






730. 


05 












18. 


84 


Exci se 


2, 226. 32 






439. 


83 




322. 


15 


can. 9. 


42 


1, 454. 


92 


Real Estate 


9, 691. 39 






6, 792. 


68 


2, 722. 22 


872. 


92 


678. 


84 


* 17. 


59 


1958 


























Poll 


204. 00 






52. 


00 




62. 


00 






90. 


00 


Personal 


4, 945. 05 






4, 223. 


51 




72. 


60 


6. 


60 


655. 


54 


Exci se 


19, 859. 98 


4, 817. 


57 


19, 531. 


27 




2, 402. 


51 


559. 


79 


1, 749. 


45 


# 


-1, 554. 1 1 
























Farm Excise 


37. 45 






37. 


45 
















Real Estate 


76, 044. 16 






57, 433. 


23 


2, 826. 18 


1,316. 


70 


1, 047. 


73 


15,515. 


78 


1959 


























Poll 




6, 470. 


00 


5, 358. 


00 




930. 


00 


18. 


00 


200. 


00 


Per sonal 




62, 559. 


18 


56, 318. 


38 




248. 


00 






5, 992. 


80 


Excise 




122, 373. 


59 


104, 737. 


67 




9, 945. 


61 


4, 787. 


19 


12, 477. 


50 


Farm Excise 




208. 


89 


202. 


64 




6. 


25 










Real Estate 




1, 465, 194. 


56 


1, 335, 200. 


30 


7, 790. 17 


51, 101. 


36 


6, 833. 


58 


77, 936. 


31 


TOTAL 


113, 665. 01 


1, 661, 623. 


79 


1, 591, 259. 


78 


14, 064. 98 


68, 102. 


50 


14, 396. 


46 


1 16, 258. 


00 



*Tax Title Account to be adjusted 

It Commitment Adjustment made in 1959 



17 




Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 

Final figure for 1958 Births - three hundred and thirty-seven (337). 

Births actually recorded to date in 1959 - three hundred and twenty- seven (327). 
(This figure will be increased when the final reports are in. ) 

Marriages recorded for 1959 - ninety-seven (97). 

Deaths recorded for 1959 - ninety-two (92). 

Chapter 46, Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45: 

Forty-one (41) burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as special agent for the Board of Health. 
Town Records: 

PERMITS AND CERTIFICATES OF REGISTRATION FOR THE STORAGE OF INFLAMMABLES - These 
licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in the Town 
Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 15 each year. 
If not registered as required by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority, after a public 
hearing. Fifty-nine (59) permits were filed in 1959. 



Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 


490 


Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 


95 


Dog Licenses Issued 


1 154 


Fish & Game Licenses 


605 


Business Certificates 


24 


Business Certificates (Women doing business on separate account) 


5 


Business Withdrawals 


1 



18 



registrars of voters 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars 
are held on the second Monday of each month for registration and the conduct of business. Under Chapter 
626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall. 

Women married prior to January 1 must re-register under their marriage name. Naturalized citi- 
zens must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence 
in the town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the 
Board so that your name will not be removed from the voting list in error. 

November 1959 there were four thousand seven hundred and eight registered voters in Town. 
Democrats - 753 Republicans - 845 Undeclared.- 3110. 

On January 1, 1959 the annual census showed a total population of eleven thousand seven hundred 
and twenty-five ( 1 1,725) inhabitants. 



Building By-Law Committee 



On May 1, 1957, the first meeting of the Advisory Committee on Building By-laws was held. 
Since that date, with the exception of certain vacation absences and other duly authorized cancelled meetings, 
weekly meetings have been conducted with your committee diligently pressing for a Building Code which will 
withstand both time and social change amid a growing population. 

For the first part of the past year, heavy concentration was placed on certain facets of the code 
pertaining to pliambing, electrical, and gas fitting requirements. As a result, the first complete draft of a 
prospective code was duly formulated. 

Your committee is now in the final process and operation of evaluating this first draft, making the 
necessary corrections, additions and deletions. 

Under all circumstances, it is felt that a finished product will be completed and presented for 
ippropriate action with the necessary recommendations sometime during the year of I960. 



19 



town counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town 
Counsel covering the year 1959. 

A. On January 1, 1959, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (ex- 
clusive of actions in which the Town was merely siimmoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and 
of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court): 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover the sum of $275. 96 for special vocational training of certain pupils. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $657. 77 plus interest for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City of 
Lowell to recover $721. 90 for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. A Certain Defendant, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action of contract under G. L. Chap. 117, Sec. 5. ) 

Jacob Levine & Sons v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action of contract to recover burial expense. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als. Commissioners of Department of Public Utili- 
ties and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk County. (Petition to review 
certain rulings and orders of the Department of Public Utilities in connection with protection at the Middle- 
sex Avenue Grade Crossing of the Boston and Maine Railroad. ) 



Town of Wilmington v. Julia Godzyk, Administratrix of the Estate of Andrew Klebasz, Fourth 
District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action of contract to recover amounts expended by the Town for 
support and hospital treatment of decedent. ) 

Marion J. Murphy v. Ernest Rice, Sr. , Bldg. Inspector et al, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Equity appeal to review the action by the Board of Appeal in denying a variance under the Zoning By-Law 
requested by the petitioner.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Wendell Phillips, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obliga- 
tion to support. ) 

Elizabeth F. Green v. Town of Wilmington and other defendants, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Action of tort for personal injuries alleged to have been sustained as a result of a defect in Shawsheen Ave. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Irving L. White, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obliga- 
tion to support. ) 

Robert J. Moran v. Mary E . Gilligan, Town Clerk, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
writ of mandamus to compel issuance of Kennel license. ) 



20 



Towne Land Development, Inc. v. Wilmington Planning Board, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Appeal in equity from action of Planning Board disapproving a proposed sub-division. Complaint entered 
in Court but no subpoena served on Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Percy G. Crocker, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Nathan Ribock, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
violation of building laws. ) 

Wilmington Board of Health v. Nagel Stone, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
occupancy of substandard dwelling. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph DeCota, Jr. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Pro- 
ceeding to enforce obligation to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. William Rich et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel. ) 

New England Gas Products Inc. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. (Three sepa- 
rate appeals from refusal of building permit. ) 

John F. Hartnett et als v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition in equity 
by ten taxpayers to compel the making of additional school appropriations by the Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allstate Sand & Gravel Co. Inc. , Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in 
equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allstate Sand & Gravel Co. and Pleasant Homes, Inc. Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Henry Mastromarino et al. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition 
for assessment of damages in taking for state highway. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington v. Edward G. Moody &; Sons, Inc. et als. Fourth District 
Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action to recover amounts paid for repair of brush fire truck. ) 

Edward G. Moody &; Son Inc. v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Arthur J. Boudreau and 
Fred F. Cain, Inc. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action to recover for repairs to brush 
fire truck. ) 



Town of Wilmington v. Estate of Joseph Shebany, Middlesex Probate Court. (Claim for expenses 
incurred by Board of Health and Dog Officer. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Frederick &c Ethel Smith et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Alice C. and William A. Dias and Campanella & Cardi Construction Co. 
Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of gravel. ) 

21 



i 



Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington v. James P. Donahue et al. Land Court. (Proceed- 
ing to secure verification of Planning Board's action in rescinding approval of part of subdivision plan. ) 



James P. Donahue et al v. A. Daniel Gillis. Middlesex Superior Court. (Action for damages 
to recover for lost profits on sales of land because of action of Planning Board. ) 

Paul Bongiorno et ux v. County of Middlesex and Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Wright & Pierce v. Town of Wilmington, United States District Court. (Action for breach of 

contract. ) 

Doris Weinstein v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assessment 
of damages for taking of land near North Wilmington Station for public parking area. ) 

B (1). During the year 1959 the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. William Baldwin et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Ruggerio et ux and Campanella and Cardi Construction Co. Middle- 
sex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway and George E. Dunn. Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition 
for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Daniel Tello et ux and Echo Glen Trucking Co. Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Francis X. Lang et als, Commissioners of Department of Public UtilitieSi 
Supreme Judicial Court. (Appeal to the Supreme Judicial Court from the order of the Department of Public 
Utilities permitting certain reductions of passenger service by the Boston & Maine Railroad. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Lawrence T. Sidelinker, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for con- 
tempt for failure to comply with decree of Court. ) 

B (2). During the year 1959 the following new actions were brought against the Town or its 
officers or Agents: 

John J. and Mary T. Hayes v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Frank &c Johanna M. Hingston v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington. Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessment of damages in land taking. ) 

Millard C. Pipes v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middle- 
sex. (Action to recover personal property tax for 1957. ) 

Mildred Tentindo v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Tort action to recover 
for personal injuries. ) 

22 



City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court. (Action to recover for hospital 
care for resident of Wilmington. ) 



Campanella &t Cardi Construction Co. v. Alfred Calabrese, Middlesex Superior Court. (Tort 
action for malicious interference with contract and obstructing way. ) 

C. During the year 1959 the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: 

Town of Wilmington v. Nathan Ribock, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin viola- 
tion of building laws. ) Disposed of by final decree dismissing bill without prejudice and without costs. 

Tow n of Wilmington v. William Rich et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin 
removal of gravel. ) Disposed of by final decree dismissing bill without prejudice and without costs. 

Town of Wilmington v. Allstate Sand & Gravel Co. Inc. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) Disposed of by final decree prohibiting further removal of sand and 
gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Henry Mastromarino et al. Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of gravel. ) Disposed of by final decree against Mastromarino. 

Town of Wilmington v. John Ruggerio et ux and Campanella and Cardi Construction Co. Middle- 
sex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) Disposed of by final decree pro- 
hibiting further removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Elizabeth Green v. Town of Wilmington and other defendants, Middlesex Superior Court. (Action 
of tort for personal injuries alleged to have been sustained as a result of a defect in Shawsheen Avenue. ) 
Disposed of by final judgment in favor of defendant as the result of a Supreme Court decision. 

James P. Donahue et al v. A. Daniel Gillis. Middlesex Superior Court. (Action for damages 
to recover for lost profits on sales of land because of action of Planning Board. ) Disposed of by judgment 
for the plaintiff of $1. 00. 

Town of Wilmington v. Estate of Joseph Shebany, Middlesex Probate Court. (Claim for expenses 
incurred by Board of Health and Dog Officer. ) Disposed of by payment to Town of $300. 00. 

Millard C. Pipes v. Inhabitants of Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middle- 
sex. (Action to recover personal property tax for 1957) Disposed of by judgment for the plaintiff. 

Town of Wilmington v. Daniel Tello et ux and Echo Glen Trucking Co. Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) Disposed of by final decree dismissing bill without 
prejudice and without costs. 

Town of Wilmington v. Lawrence T. Sidelinker, Middlesex Superior Court . (Petition for con- 
tempt for failure to comply with decree of Court. ) Disposed of by final decree ordering defendant to comply 
with court order. 

D. Compensation was received by the Town Counsel in said matters and in all other matters 
during the year as follows: 

Compensation $2985. 00 (less discount of $1117. 36 to conform to available 

appropriation) $1867.64 
Disbursements 632. 36 

$2500. 00 

(The above amounts were entirely on account of services rendered and disbursements paid in the calendar 
year 1957). 

23 



planning board 





Re-zoning Hearing 



I. General Planning: 



In 1957 the Planning Board presented the first three elements of a General Plan: a Master Plan 
of Land Use, a Plan for Major Thoroughfares, and a Plan for Community Facilities. 



The additional elements necessary to make the General Plan complete are: a Capital Improvement 
Program, a Recreation Development Program, and a School Plant Development Program. 

This final phase is now 95% complete, and the publication of these three remaining items will be 
made to the Town early in I960. 

II. Sub -division Control: 



New Sub-divisions 



Plan 



Location 



Federal Park Development Federal St. 



Completion 

0% 



No. of 
Bldg. Lots 
20 



B. Existing Sub-divisions 



Plan Location Completion Lot Size 

Wilton Park Shaw sheen Ave. 100% 60, 000 sq. ft. 

Pinehill Park Glen Road 100% 10,000 

Esquire Estates Salem Street 50% 22,500 

Roberts Estates Burlington Ave. 30% 22,500 

Woodland Park Estates Lowell Street 20% 22,500 



C. Plot Plans Signed: 



All plot plans of land in Wilmington to be recorded in the Registry, with the exception of subdivision 
plans, must be submitted to the Planning Board and be stamped "Believed not to require approval", 
and signed by the board. Fifty- seven (57) such plans were signed during the past year. 



24 



D. Restrictions Voted: 

From time to time in order to protect the Town and future home owners, the Planning Board may 
find it necessary to vote restrictions as to sale or construction of previously approved sub-divisions, 
until either required improvements are made or a bond is posted to insure compliance with the regu- 
lations. Of such restrictions previously placed, one was removed. 

E. Conclusion; 



The results of careful planning and strict enforcement of regulations are now quite evident in the 
form of those sub-divisions now fully completed. Wide paved streets, curbing, paved sidewalks, 
planting strips, trees, and houses set well back on large lots all serve to make our sub-divisions 
one of the finest in the region. 

Preliminary plans are now being reviewed for another new sub-division encompassing seventy-two 
building lots in aZZ, 500 sq. ft. zone. 



III. 



Zoning: 



A. Reports and Recommendations to Town Meeting: 



Town Meeting 






Planning Bd. 


Town Meeting 


Date 


Article 


Proposed Change 


Recommend. 


Action 


March 1959 


31 


From SRA to Ind. 


Yes 


Yes 




32 


From SRB to NB 


No 


No 




33 


From SRA to Ind. 


No 


Article 
withdrawn 




34 


From SRA to Ind. 


No 


No 




35 


From SRA to GB 


No 


No 


July 1959 


2 


Amend Sec. VII- 1 


Yes 


Yes 




3 


From NB to GB 


Yes 


Yes 




4 


From Ind. to GB 


Yes 


Yes 




5 


From SRA to GB 


No 


No 



Proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map are reviewed by the Planning Board, which 
holds a public hearing and submits a formal report and recommendations to the Town Meeting. In 
each particular case during the past year, the Planning Board's recommendations were felt to be 
in keeping with the best interests of the Town. The Board wishes to thank the townspeople of 
Wilmington for their confidence and support in these zoning matters. 

B. Reports to Board of Appeals: 

The Zoning By-law requires that the Planning Board shall submit advisory reports to the Board of 
Appeals for certain appeal cases. In addition thereto, the Board is usually represented at public 
hearings of the Board of Appeals and consults informally with the Board of Appeals on questions of 
mutual interest. 

Of the two formal reports submitted to the Board of Appeals, one recommended disapproval, and 
the Board of Appeals concurred. The other decision is pending. 



IV. 



Street Names and Street Signs: 



During the past year public hearings were held to change several hundred street names, many of 
which had duplicate names. As a result, many streets now are identified with street signs bearing 



25 



V. 



the incorrect name. To correct this situation, an article is being placed in the Warrant requesting 
funds to place new signs on all streets with new names, and at intersections to identify both the 
cross street and the main street. 

Parks and Recreation: 



The Planning Board, which also serves as the Board of Park Commissioners, is striving to make 
Silver Lake Beach a better place of recreation for all townspeople through gradual improvement of 
the grounds and facilities, within the budget. 

This year identification tags were issued to all Wilmington families using the beach facilities, in a 
successful attempt to limit the beach use to residents of the Town. Next year it is planned to ex- 
tend the beach area and to landscape the grounds to the rear of the beach. 

The Town Common sidewalks were constructed last year. This year the land was graded and seeded. 
Next year it is planned to make a landscaping study of the Common. 



VI. 



Special Meetings and Hearings: 



During the year, the Planning Board, in addition to holding its weekly meetings, attended several 
public hearings and dozens of meetings with various Town Boards. 

The public hearings concerned street name changes, zoning changes, proposed sub-divisions, and 
appeals. 



Meetings with other boards involved capital outlay planning, selection of school sites, urban re- 
newal, and zoning violations. 



VII. 



General: 



The Planning Board wishes to acknowledge the full cooperation received from the people of the Town, 
all the boards and town officials, and hopes for their continued cooperation during the coming year. 




Inspection Tour 
26 



town engineer 




Mr. George F. Maynard, Town Engineer for the first part of the year, resigned in the month of 
August and was replaced by Mr. Alphonse L. Savignac in the month of September. The practice of employ- 
ing Northeastern University cooperative students was continued during the year. 

The work handled by the engineering department consisted of making the necessary surveys and 
designs of new construction handled by the town forces, supervising new roads, drainage, etc. built by the 
subdivision contractors, keeping maps and plans to date for tax purposes, and checking on gravel pits in 
order to determine if the specifications were being complied with. 

Eames Street was surveyed its entire length as it was necessary to establish the street line for a new 
industry to locate along the road. Roads, parking lots, and locations of utilities were staked out and laid 
out for the Glen Road School. Surveys were made to obtain a contour map of the Urban Renewal area in the 
center of the Town. 

Through our contact with the county engineer. Concord Street (from Woburn Street to Middlesex Ave. ) 
was surveyed by the county survey crews, and the street line of Woburn Street at the junction of Woburn and 
Eames Street was established. 

Fairmeadow Road, Bridge Lane, Longview Road, Ledgewood Road, Hilltop Road, Glenview Road 
and Shady Lane were completed during the year, and the construction of these streets was supervised by 
the engineer. Beeching Avenue, being done under betterments, was started and will be finished during I960. 
Drainage was staked out on Shawsheen Road, Lockwood Road and Oakdale Road. 

The only gravel pit operating under a permit during 1959 was the Tello Pit on .Andover Street. None 
of the bonds for the other pits were released during the year as more clean-up work needed to be done. 

Subdivisions completed, or substantially completed, include Esquire Estates, Wilton Park and Pine 
Hill Park. 



27 



board of appeals 



Following is the report of the Board of Appeals for the year 1959. This report contains the name of 
the petitioner and the disposition of each case. 

Case #1 January 22, 1959 - Wilmington Methodist Church - request for variance in side line distance 

on lot of land on Beacon Street - denied. 

Case #2 January 22, 1959 - Polcaro Bros. - request for additional storage space - granted. 

Case #3 February 12, 1959 - Vito Mercauto - request to move house onto lot in industrial zone - denied. 

Case #4 February 12, 1959 - Philip S. Park - request to move house into industrial zone - granted. 

Case #5 February 12, 1959 - George Dohlberg - request to establish day camp for children - granted. 

Case #6 February 26, 1959 - John F. Parr - request to use trailer in rear of Wilmington Diner - denied 

Case #7 February 26, 1959 - Robert H. Lawrence - request for variance in side line distance - granted 

six feet. 

Case #8 February 26, 1959 - James W. Fioreriza - request for variance in size of lot - granted with 

2 5 feet side line. 

Case #9 March 26, 1959 - Anthony Borghetti - request for variance in division of lot on Kendall Street - 

no action. 

Case #10 March 26, 1959 - Max ? eigal - request to remove earth products - no action taken. 

Case #11 March 26, 1959 - William Baldwin - request to remove earth products - denied. 

Case #12 April 9, 1959 - J. Raymond Ashworth - request for variance in front yard - granted. 

Case #13 April 9, 1959 - Joseph E. Carpenter - request for variance in side line - granted 9 feet. 

Case #14 April 9, 1959 - Carl N. Christiansen - request for variance in shape of lot - granted. 

Case #15 April 9, 1959 - George Stevens - request for variance to construct non-conforming sign - 
granted with 30 feet set back. 

Case #16 April 23, 1959 - Agnes F. Fagan - request to change garage into medical office - granted. 

Case #17 April 23, 1959 - Malcolm S. Butler - request for variance in side line - granted 5 feet. 

Case #18 April 23, 1959 - Basil Weatherbee - request for variance in shape of lot - granted. 

Case #19 May 7, 1959 - Meltan Pinto - request for variance in side line - granted 3 feet. 

Case #20 May 7, 1959 - Philip Gardner - request permission to store loam off Route 62 while waiting 
sale - granted. 

28 



Case 


#24 


Case 


o c 


Case 


#26 


Case 


#27 


Case 


#28 


Case 


#29 


Case 


4 "2 n 
#30 


Case 


#31 


Case 


#32 


Case 


#33 


Case 


#34 


Case 


#35 


Case 


#36 


Case 


#37 


Case 


#38 


Case 


#39 



May 7, 1959 - Forest Dame - request for variance in side line - granted. 

May 7, 1959 - David Mrakovich - request for variance in side line - granted. 

May 14, 1959 - Mary E. Shea - request for variance in depth of lot - granted. 

May 21, 1959 - Demoular Realty Company - request for variance in building code re-distance 
between partition - granted. 

May 21, 1959 - Judson Arbo - request for variance in size of lot - granted. 

June 4, 1959 - Wilmington Builder Supply Company - request for variance in set-back. Granted 
continuance of present set-back. 

June 4, 1959 - Charles A. Mclnnis - request permission to build garage within front yard area - 
granted. 

June 4, 1959 - Jesse Souza - request permission to divide lot at # 1 Rhodes Street and build 
dwelling with less than required back yard - granted. 

June 11, 1959 - Robert E. Jaye s - request to build on non-conforming lot on Bellevue Avenue - 
denied. 

June 11, 1959 - Joseph Charnecky - request permission to change location of garage - denied. 

June 11, 1969 - George E. Dunn - request permission to remove earth products from land off 
Concord Street - denied. 

June 11, 1959 - Henry Mastromarino - request permission to remove earth products from land 
near West Street - denied. 

Ernest N. Eames - request permission to remove earth products from land off Concord Street - 
request withdrawn. 

June 11, 1959 - Paul Bongiorno - request variance in side line - granted on condition back yard 
is moved back 25 feet. 

June 18, 1959 - HoUis Bowman - request permission to divide lot - granted. 

June 18, 1959 - Elizabeth Gray - request permission to build dwelling in industrial zone - 
granted. 

June 18, 1959 - Galtono Schiavone - request variance in side line distance - granted. 

June 18, 1959 - Archdiocese of Boston - request permission to build steeple on church - granted. 

June 25, 1959 - Samuel A. Leone - request permission to establish funeral home at 142 Church 
Street - denied. 

July 2, 1959 - J. H. Dupont - request permission to establish saw mill off Lowell St. - denied. 
July 2, 1959 - Auburn Realty Trust - request for variance in lot size - granted 90 x 106 ft. 
July 2, 1959 - Burton T. West - request permission to build non-conforming addition - granted. 

29 



Case #43 

Case #44 

Case #45 
Case #46 
Case #47 
Case #48 

Case #49 
Case #50 
Case #51 

Case #52 

Case #53 

Case #54 
Case #55 

Case #56 

Case #57 

Case #58 
Case #59 

Case #60 
Case #61 
Case #62 

Case #63 

Case #64 



July 9, 1959 - Esquire Homes, Inc. - request variance in chimney construction for dwelling 
on Lot #2 - approve house on Lot #2 only. 

July 9, 1959 - Leon H. Hurd - request permission to use trailer as office on B & M property - 
granted with restriction. 

July 9, 1959 - George McGondel - request permission to divide lot at 117 Federal St. - denied. 

July 30, 1959 - Lionel M. Baldwin - request variance in lot size at 18 Andover St. - granted. 

July 30, 1959 - Nina T. Fay - request variance in shape of lot on Woburn Street - granted. 

July 30, 1959 - Daniel Tello - request permission to remove earth products from land off 
Andover Street - approved three acres uoder Board of Selectmen's regulations. 

July 30, 1959 - Adrian Durkee - request variance in lot line to construct tool house - granted. 

August 6, 1969 - Robert J. O Handley - request for side line variance - granted five feet. 

August 6, 1959 - Town of Wilmington - request permission to construct Highway Building and 
Police Station in residential zone - granted. 

August 20, 1959 - Joseph D. Harrington - request to build dwelling on a non-conforming lot on 
Amherst Road - decision pending. 

August 20, 1959 - Alden S. Eames - request for variance in side line distance - granted eight 
feet variance. 

August 20, 1959 - Wilmington Ford Co. - request for a non-conforming sign - denied. 

September 10, 1959 - James Castellano - request for variance in side distance - granted five 
feet variance . 



September 10, 1959 - Dr. John R. Marshall - request for variance in side line distance to build 
garage - granted 10 feet variance. 

September 10, 1959 - William A. Anderson - request permission to subdivide into non-conform- 
ing lots - denied. 

September 24, 1959 - John H. Freitag - request to build non- conforming summer house - grante 

September 24, 1959 - Anthony Janerico - request to expand non-conforming business - granted 
50% increase. 

October 8, 1959 - Gennaro D'Urso - request to build non-conforming dwelling on West St. -denie 

October 22, 1959 - Guy Nichols - request to expand non-conforming business - granted 50% inc. 

October 22, 1959 - Dexter L. Titus - request permission to establish child care center on 
Woburn Street - approved. 

October 22, 1959 - Alma Williams - request permission to erect neon sign at place of business 
granted with restriction. 

October 22, 1959 - Dragon Cement Company - request permission to establish cement distribu- 
tion plant on Eames Street - granted with restrictions and conditions. 



30 



November 4, 1959 - Dr. John Pyne - request for variance of Section 111, A-9-F of the zoning 
by-laws - granted. 

November 4, 1959 - Kencraft Homes, Inc. - request for a variance of section V3 and V5 of the 
zoning by-laws - granted. 

November 1 1, 1959 - Charles A. Foberg - request to erect a building and a variance of side 
line - granted side 10 feet to rear line 9 feet variance. 

November 11, 1959 - The Magee Construction Company - request to process and remove peat - 
no decision. 

November 1 1, 1959 - Charles F. Sicard - request for variance of side line - granted for 12 ft. 
side line. 

November 1 1, 1959 - Kencraft Homes, Inc. - published error. 

November 1 1, 1959 - Ralph L. Buck & Miriam Ware - request for variance in zoning law to 
allow for a twenty- six foot right of way - granted. 

December 12, 1959 - William T. Carver - request to divide a lot - denied. 

December 12, 1959 - Anna Veloza - request permission to establish a beauty shop in home - 
denied. 

December 12, 1959 - Wilmington Ford Company - request permission to erect a body shop - 
granted. 




31 



building inspector 





About two-thirds of the building inspector's work concerns the Zoning By-law. By its terms, he 
interprets this By-law and has the primary duty for its enforcement. The interpretation takes the most time 
I have given zoning decisions literally by the thousand; this year eighty-four of the refusals were later 
decided by the Board of Appeals; many decided in favor of the appellant. 



For those who may not be clear on the relationship between the Planning Board, the Public, the 
Zoning By-law, the Board of Appeals and the Building Inspector, a few words of explanation. The Planning 
Board, after study, consultation with other boards and experts retained by them, and public hearings, brings 
a complete By-law or an amendment before the voters, in Town Meeting assembled; upon receiving the 
necessary majority vote it becomes part of the By-laws of the Town, and (like all legislation) is to be 
literally enforced (exactly as written) by the BuildingTnspector . 

Realizing that no set of rules can fit every possible case, there is set up a Board of Appeals to 
"vary" within prescribed limits, the provisions of the Zoning and Building By-laws passed in cases where 
literal enforcement would work hardship on one individual out of proportion to the benefit realized by all 
from operation of the By-law. 1 do not consider that granting of a "variance" by the Board of Appeals is 
a reflection on the Building Inspector; the Board forms a necessary means of giving the By-law flexibility 
without leaving the merits of each case to unpublicized decision by an individual. 



Permits Issued 



No. 



Fee s 



Insp. Recvd. 



Building 

Plumbing 

Wiring 



301 
144 
403 



$1, 362. 00 
1,111. 50 
1, 989. 50 



$ 623.00 
1, 394. 85 



848 



$4, 463. 00 



$2,017. 85 



32 







Owner' s 


Building Insp. 


Permits Issued 


No. 


Estimate 


Estimate 


Dwellings 


1 10 


$1, 343, 490 


$1, 465, 470 


Additions to dwellings 


42 


64, 800 


81, 930 


Alte rations 


20 


1 1, 875 


18, 250 


Garages & Carports 


23 


25, 200 


30, 900 


Warehouses & Storage 


2 


300, 000 


300, 000 


Commercial - New 


4 


31,000 


106, 000 


Commercial - Alt. & Add. 


9 


1 1, 700 


18, 800 


Tool Sheds 


5 


1, 775 


3, 200 


Barns & Stables 


1 


4, 560 


5 000 


Signs 


2 


3, 500 


3, 500 


Church 


1 


280, 000 


280, 000 


Schools 


2 


597, 603 


597, 603 


Town Buildings 


2 


118, 000 


118, 000 


Industrial 


14 


200, 800 


277, 400 


Commercial Garage 


1 


8, 000 


15, 000 


Fire Damage 


5 


10, 400 


14, 100 


Foundations 


4 


5, 300 


6, 000 


Recreation 


1 


3, 000 


4, 300 


Mi scellaneous 


3 


4, 640 


6, 500 


Also: 








Renewals 


34 






Demoli shed 


9 







veteran^i" agent 



The year 1959 produced the largest expenditure for Veterans Aid since the program was revised in 
1946 after World War II. Once again it was a substantial increase in hospital and medical care which was 
responsible for the major part of the increase. 

Fifty-four (54) applications for aid were processed with thirty-eight (38) cases being aided finan- 
cially. Employable veterans (those able to work, but temporarily out of work) accounted for only $2300 
of a total expenditure of over $20, 000 which is a highly favorable balance. 

As in past years, we must acknowledge the help of the Wilmington Community Fund, and also 
Mr. A. Ring and the Welfare Department who helped to care for those families not eligible for veterans 
benefits. 



33 



police department 



CHIEF OF POLICE 
Paul J. Lynch 




<^ ffiL ^B. S U S 



Armed Robbery 


1 


Lewdne s s 


Assault & Battery 


1 1 


Non Support 


Arrested for other department 


16 


Operating Under the Influence 


A. W. O. L. (Military) 


1 


Operating without a License 


Breaking & Entering & Larceny 


8 


Operating to Endanger 


Concealed Weapon 


1 


Operating after Suspension 


Drunkenne s s 


58 


Receiving Stolen Property 


Illegitimacy 


1 


Speeding 


Indecent Assault 


1 


Statutory Rape 


Insane 


5 


Un-insured Vehicle 


Juveniles Arrested 


17 


Un-registered Vehicle 


Larceny 


6 





Total Fines Assessed $655 

Auto Accidents: A total of 178 accidents were recorded in town this year. Of this number, 65 
were listed as personal injury accidents, 6 were children on bikes, 3 were pedestrians, 1 was a hit and run, 
and 1 was fatal. The fatal was Wilmington's only one for the year. . . a record for which we can be thankful. 

Buildings Found Open: Officers, making their nightly patrols checking business places, found 
fifty -five places left open by the owners. 

Emergency Trips with Cruisers: We responded to fifty-six calls for the cruiser to take people to 
hospitals, from hospitals to their homes, and from scenes of accidents to doctors. 

Automobiles Stolen: Wilmington residents reported fifteen cars stolen during the year. 

Automobiles Recovered: We found all fifteen that were stolen from the town, and recovered two 
more that were stolen elsewhere and left here. 

34 



Summonses Delivered: We received 266 summonses from other departments to be delivered to 
residents who violated some traffic laws outside the town limits. 



Missing Persons : We had a total of twenty-nine persons missing from their homes. Of this 
number, twenty-five have returned home - the other four have elected to remain away from their homes for 
reasons best known to themselves. 

Lost Children: We had fourteen children reported missing, and thank God we found them all! 
But, it was only by the grace of God that we found a couple of them before they fell into the river. 

Bicycles Stolen: Reported stolen from within the town - 27 bikes. We only receovered 20 of them. 
Parents should instruct bike owners to nrotect them better. 

Sudden Deaths: Records show that twelve persons died suddenly during the year. In cases of 
this nature we have to call the Medical Examiner to determine the cause of death. 

Operation "Road Watch": This is the program that Registrar Riley inaugurated whereby his men 
are sent out without any advance notice during the early morning hours (after midnight) to check all vehicles 
in the State operating on leading highways. The program is something terrific ! Word gets around very 
quickly after the program is over, and it keeps motorists on guard at all times. We had four such "Road 
Watches" during the year. 

Licenses Suspended: One Hundred and forty-seven (147) Wilmington operators had their 
licenses suspended during the year for motor vehicle violations. This action is taken by the Registry on com- 
plaints of other departments who apprehend them violating. 

Vandalism: We received seventy-three reports of vandalism during the year. This covered 

damage to schools, private homes, street lights, etc and the part that amazes me is that NO ONE 

SEEMS TO SEE ANY ONE DOING ANY OF THIS DAMAGE. We of the department cannot be every place. . . 
AND WE ASK THAT RESIDENTS WHO MAY WITNESS SUCH ACTS OF VANDALISM REPORT THEM TO US. 

Indecent Phone Calls: This item gave us a lot of trouble during the year. We received sixteen 
complaints and were only successful in solving two cases. I feel with the new "tracing equipment" now m 
service that we can do a lot better in the future. 

Emergency Messages Delivered: We delivered one hundred and five emergency messages during 
the year to residents, and of this number eleven of them were death messages. 

Burglar Alarms: Investigated sixty alarms that sounded from business places during the night 

time . 

Miscellaneous Items 



Attempted Suicides 2 

Buildings Broken Into 76 

Fires Responded To 30 

Complaints Received (all types) 450 

Domestic Complaints Investigated 160 

Prowlers Reported 39 

Evading Taxi Fares 3 

Damage to Property 54 

Transfers of Vehicles (private sales) 199 

Sales by Class 1 Dealers 517 

Sales by Class 2 Dealers 422 

Found Unconscious in Public 3 



35 



That covers most of the functions of the department. There are many other things that we do but 
not worthy of listing at this time. 

In concluding the report, may I take this means to express my sincere thanks to the Women 
Traffic Supervisors for the swell job they have handled so well . 

To all the departments that have been so ever willing to cooperate with us whenever needed. 

To Fire Chief Boudreau and his wonderful "guys" for all the help they have given us. 

To the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager for their interest in the department's welfare. 




Women Traffic Supervisors 




Police Station - Nearing Completion 



36 



tree department 




Tree Department: 

Our routine work such as removing trees and broken tree limbs, topping, and trimming low limbs 
was carried on throughout the year. Twenty-eight trees were cut down for street widening, and all the brush 
was hauled to the dump and burned. All shade trees were sprayed three times. Oak trees will have to be 
sprayed at least twice to stop the oak blight. 

The Tree Department cut trees in the cemetery to make room for new graves worked on the Common 
raking loam for seed and planting flowers; planted sixteen maple trees on Lowell and Salem Streets- made a 
lawn in front of the Tree Department building: set up the Christmas tree on the Common given by Herbert C. 
Barrows and stryng the Christmas lights. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 

Spraying was started April 15, and all elms were sprayed four times with 12% and 6% D. D. T. This 
year the State gave the town five barrels of 25% D. D. T. Ninety-six samples of elm trees were sent to the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Mass. for testing, and sixty-nine were returned labeled "dutch elm 
disease" . 

Moth Department: 

Shade trees were sprayed with 6% and 12% D. D. T. for gypsy moth, tent caterpillar, fall web worms, 
oak blight, aphids, pine shoot moth, and maple leaf spot. 

Town Forest: 



A large amount of brush, five large pines, seven oaks and eight maples were cut down and hauled 
away. We sprayed the ball field and the Old Middlesex Canal. 

Mosquitoes : 

As in previous years, we sprayed all bog holes, swamps, and private property where our sprayer 
could reach. 

Poison Ivy: 

Brush killer was sprayed along the streets, on stone walls, all brush, and private property (where 
requested). Also, if the growth of dogwood is suspected, the Tree Department on request will examine the 
growth and if necessary spray it. 



37 



fire department 



FIRE CHIEF 
Arthur J. Boudreau 




The 1959 report of the Fire Chief is hereby submitted. The manual force consists of Chief, three 
Lieutenants, and eight privates. There is a Call Force of eighteen members. 

The department responded to a total of six hundred and eighty-seven (687) calls, one hundred and 
forty-seven (147) bell alarms, and five hundred and forty (540) still alarms. 



Ambulance Calls 


297 


Dumps 


8 


Auto & Truck 


19 


Electric Wires 


3 


Brush & Grass 


182 


False Alarms 


32 


Buildings 


36 


First Aid at Station 


1 


Bridge 


1 


Oil Burners 


19 


Chimneys 


2 


Out of Town 


11 


Service Calls 


73 


R. R. Trains 


3 


Permits Issued for Burning 


2150 


Permits Issued for Oil 


164 


Permits Issued for Gas 


54 


Permits Issued for Blasting 


26 



A total of 55, 145 ft. of fire hose was laid: 24,395 ft. of booster hose , 5,050 ft. of 1 1/8", 13,600 ft 
of 1 1/2" hose, and 12, 100 ft. of 2 1/2" hose. Ladders were raised 532 ft. Total value of property en- 
dangered was $182, 350. The property loss was $46, 043. 19. 

Inspections were made of rest homes, schools, and all public buildings as requested by the State. 
Inspections of all new gasoline tank locations were made as requested. 

With the exception of Engine #5 and the Fire Alarm truck, all equipment is in good condition. Serious 
consideration should be given to replacing Engine #5, a 1938 Chevrolet housed at the North Wilmington Pump 
ing Station, which is in very poor condition. I am asking to have the Fire Alarm truck replaced. It is a 
1950 Chevrolet and was turned over to this department after the Police Department had used it as a cruiser 
for over a year, and it is in very poor condition. Also, I am asking to have Engine #1 painted. 



38 



The Junior Fire Marshall Plan was held throughout the past year in all the sixth grades, under the 
direction of the Fire Chief, Lieut. George S. Gushing, and Lawrence Gushing, Physical Director of the 
Wilmington Schools. 

Members of the department installed fire alarm wires from Salem Street, down Woburn Street to 
Hathaway Road to Gunderson Road, also from Main Street and Burlington Avenue to the Old Age Housing 
Project. Also, there were six new street boxes installed. 



sealer of weights & measures 



Gas Pumps 

Grease & Oil Pumps 

Scale s: 

Under 100 lbs. 
ICQ to 5000 lbs. 
5000 to 10, 000 lbs. 
10, 000 lbs. and up 
Vehicle tanks 
Taxi Meters 
Bulk Storage 



No. 
Sealed 

46 
33 



50 
20 

3 
21 
3 
2 



No. 

Adjusted 

30 




35 
14 




21 



2 

Condemned 



Oil & Grease Pumps 
Scale s: 

Under 100 lbs. 

100 lbs. to 5000 lbs. 

Gas Pumps 



Qts. 



2 
1 

6 

1/2 Gal. 



Inadequate measures in milk containers turned back 
to milk companies and not allowed to sell 

Prepacked Weights: 

Grain 
Meat 



24 

Inspected 

157 
219 



34 

Correct or Over 

137 
219 



Under 

20 




39 



water department 



WATER SUPERINTENDENT 
Edmund H. Sargent 




Water Supply: 

During 1959 twenty new tubular wells were driven at the Barrow's Well Field making a total of fifty- 
five. A new electric motor -driven pump with a capacity of one million gallons per day is being installed at 
the Barrow's Station and should be in operation early in I960. 

At a test site off Chestnut Street one eight-inch test well has been completed, and several observation 
wells have been driven in connection with further testing. The early results are encouraging, and if final 
tests are successful, a new well field of considerable capacity will be developed with initial operations 
planned for I960. 

Detailed Pumping Statistics are set forth below 
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Day 1,644.600 1,458,100 1,800,500 1,850,600 2,089,100 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Week 10,941,300 9,548,000 1 1,784,000 9,731,500 14,116,700 

Maximum gallons 

pumped per Month 43,228,500 41,020,400 44,339,000 38,549,000 56,948,300 

Average gallons 

pumped per Day 844,900 922,470 979,750 1,081,700 1,590,785 

Average gallons 

p\imped per Month 25,692,550 28,135,330 29,800,825 32,902,000 48,386,442 

Total gallons 

pumped per Year 308,310,600 337,623,950 357,609.900 394,824,800 580,637,300 



40 



Water Main Extensions: 



The water mains on the Nichols Street Bridge and Clifton Street were completed to finish the 1958 
betterments. 

The following installations were installed by builders and developers; 



Miscellaneous: 



Street 



No. of Feet 
8" Main 



No. of Feet 
6" Main 



Salem Street 
Roberts Drive 
Judith Road 
Cedar Street 



570 



570 



780 
200 
160 
1, 140 



Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 
Total Services 



2, 707 

94 

2, 801 



New Hydrants Installed 
New Services Installed 
New Meters Installed 



5 

143 
176 



constable 



Town Manager 
Wilmington, Mass. 

During the year of 1959, I have posted notices of Town meetings and Town warrants in accordanc 

with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington also, served and posted notices for other departments 

for the Town of Wilmington. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry J. Ainsworth 
Constable of Wilmington 



41 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building. Committee was organized in 1958 following the vote of the 1958 Annual 
Town Meeting which authorized the Selectmen and Town Manager to appoint a five -member committee with 
over lapping terms to superintend the construction of all public buildings in the Town. The article of the 
1958 Annual Town Meeting also provided that the Permanent Building Committee would have one advisory 
non-voting member from the Board of Selectmen, School Committee, Finance Committee, Planning Board, 
and where school buildings were under construction the Superintendent of Schools. The Town Manager is an 
advisory member for all construction in the Town. The membership of the advisory group shall always in- 
clude the head of the department concerned with the use of any new public building. 

The Glen Road Elementary School was the first major building in the town to be constructed under 
the supervision of the Permanent Building Committee. 

The Permanent Building Committee has, since its last report to the town meeting, been assigned 
the tasks of building a police station, a public works garage, and another elementary school. The police 
station and the garage are virtually complete - the garage having been used by the Highway Department since 
mid- January. 

Glen Road Elementary School; 

Our report last year described the status of construction of the Glen Road School, and our hope 
that it would be ready for occupancy by September 1959. Unfortunately an error was made by a steel 
supplier in the thickness of certain supporting steel columns. This was discovered by our architects who 
thereupon ordered the removal of 96 columns. Due to the steel strike the correct columns could not be 
obtained for several weeks, and this caused severe delays in the entire construction schedule. The Glen 
Road School was opened on December 9, 1959 and was formally dedicated with appropriate ceremonies on 
January 9, I960. The Town was honored by having His Excellency Governor Foster Furcolo as the prin- 
cipal speaker on that occasion. 

It is not yet possible to report to the Town on the final cost of the Glen Road School since topsoil- 
ing, seeding, grading, and the installation of exterior athletic equipment remain to be done in order to pro- 
vide a complete and much needed recreational facility in this area. It is the intent of our comrriittee to 
establish the largest playground area possible, consistent with school and neighborhood requirements. The 
Planning Board has requested the building committee to do this within the limit of available funds and state 
reimbursement regulations. The area which will be provided is shown in a sketch incorporated in this 
report. While exact final figures cannot be known as yet, the costs listed below are relatively accurate 
projections of the final cost. The school will be completed at less cost than budgeted. 



GLEN ROAD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Estimated Cost As of December 31, 1959 



Construction 
Road, Parking Utilities 
Architect & Engineering Fees 
Equipment and Furniture 
Playground 
Site Acquisition 
Total 



$310, 000 
25, 000 
26, 000 
20, 000 
11, 000 
5, 400 

$397, 400 



Construction Cost per Pupil 
Construction Cost per Classroom 
Construction Cost per Sq. Ft. 



Total Cost 
Total Cost 
Total Cost 



Per Pupil 

Per Classroom 

Per Square Foot 



5 861.00 
25, 833. 00 
15. 19 
1, 086. 00 
32, 583. 00 
19. 16 



(*Less Site Acquisition) 



42 




AT THE DEDICATION OF THE GLEN ROAD SCHOOL 
Donald C. Kidder, Chairman -Board of Selectmen, 
Governor Foster Furcolo, and Members of the Permanent 
Building Committee - Erwin Hanke and Joseph F. Courtney 




GLEN R OA D ELEMENTARY 



SCHOOL 



43 



This committee is pleased to report that the School Department enjoys working with the children 
in the environment created by this new school building. Those who were present at the dedication of the 
Glen Road School on January 9, I960 observed that, although this building was comparatively low in cost, the 
quality of materials and workmanship were high. Suggestions from the teachers and the School Department 
based on their experience in this new building are, insofar as possible, being incorporated in the plans of 
the Boutweli Street School. The Boutwell Street School should be an even better educational facility with 
this added assistance from the Superintendent of Schools and the teaching staff. 

New Police Station; 

Article 27 of last year's Annual Town Meeting authorized the construction of a Police Station. The 
building should be completed by late spring. The police station is colonial in style and is all masonry con- 
struction with a wood frame roof. The station has facilities for twenty-four policemen, which is approxi- 
mately double our present police force, and can be used for detention of both juvenile and female prisoners 
in accordance with good police practice and modern design. There are five cells for male prisoners. The 
building has a full size pistol range and five administrative offices, as well as a separate office for the 
Chief of Police. 

NEW POLICE STATION 
Estimated Cost As of December 31, 1959 



Construction $66,000 

Road, Paving, Utilities 2,000 

Architect and Engineering Fees 5, 500 

Furniture and Equipment 1 , 500 

Total $75,000 



The n ew Police Station should be adequate for the needs of the Town for many years, and its style 
and location will lend themselves easily to incorporation as an element of a municipal center for the Town 
if the need arises for such a development in the future. 

Public Works Garage: 

Article 1 5 of last year's Annual Town Meeting authorized the construction of a public works garage. 
The garage has been occupied since mid-January although the final items will not be completed for a few 
weeks. The garage will have ample storage space for all of the Highway Department's vehicles and equip- 
ment. The building is 156 ft. long and 66 ft. wide. Attached to the garage quarters is a smaller building 
containing office area, locker room, and utility room which will assist the Highway Department in performing 
its functions. 

The garage is located on town-owned land off Andover Street and has outside storage space for oil, 
gasoline, sand and other items which are used by the various town departments. The garage contains a lift 
which can be used by all types of vehicles, and possibly a savings can be effected by performing all main- 
tenance such as fueling, oiling, and greasing for all town vehicles at the garage. Since there is ample space 
for the storage of additional equipment, and the building may be easily expanded, it may prove feasible to 
garage the fire truck serving North Wilmington in this facility, and thereby eliminate the need for a separate 
sub- station. 

NEW PUBLIC WORKS GARAGE 
Estimated Cost As of December 31, 1959 



Construction $69,000 

Utilities 1,500 

Architect and Engineering Fees 4,000 

Furniture and Equipment 500 

Total $75,000 



44 



Boutwell Street Elementary School: 



Article 10 of an Adjourned Special Town Meeting last July, authorized the construction of the Bout- 
well Street Elementary School. This school has been under construction since November, and work has 
been progressing very well. The committee is optimistic about completing the school in time for the open- 
ing of school in the fall. Any unforseen occurrence can of course prevent the completion before this time. 

The Boutwell Street School is virtually identical to the Glen Road School although some changes 
have been made. Due to the cost experience obtained on the Glen Road School, it was possible to improve 
the quality of the school in certain respects such as greater use of terrazzo floors and additional storage 
space. In all other respects apart from a changed foundation design required by different soil conditions, 
the schools are identical. 

The opening of the Boutwell Street School will relieve the pressure for elementary classroom 
space for a few years, and another elementary school will not have to be built until the latter part of the 
sixties if the Town provides an intermediate school of twenty rooms by September 1962. An intermediate 
school of this size in North Wilmington will be required, and ten of the rooms can be used for elementary 
grades for a few years. 

BCUTWELL STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Estimated Cost As of December 31, 1959 



Construction $337,000 

Road, Parking, Utilities 12,000 

Architect and Engineering Fees 12, 000 

Equipment and Furniture 20, 000 

Playground 7,000 

Site Acquisition 10, OOP 

Total $398,000 



New Site Acquisitions: 

The Permanent Building Committee in its function relative to additional school accommodations 
has met on numerous occasions during the past year with the Planning Board and its consultants, the School 
Department, and various town officers to discuss the long term future of Wilmington School's building 
requirements. It is believed by all concerned that the Town should consider the economy of buying the 
necessary land for several school buildings that will be needed for the next ten years. The cost of land is 
increasing, and in addition the relatively large tracts of land which are necessary for each school area are 
becoming and will continue to become more scarce. The advent of Interstate Route 93 will undoubtedly 
cause an increase in the rate of home building in Wilmington and early action is indicated. A special town 
meeting to consider this problem appears desirable to the committee. 

New Intermediate School: 

Swift action on an intermediate school is also necessary, and for this reason the committee 
recommends favorable consideration of Article 24 of the warrant which will provide the necessary funds to 
make preliminary designs for a new twenty-room intermediate school. If a school is to be opened in 1962, 
construction should commence in the Spring of 1961. The Permanent Building Committee believes that more 
time is needed for the design of an Intermediate School than for an Elementary School. Upon completion of 
preliminary designs, the Permanent Building Committee can report to the town meeting the most economical 
design solution for this problem. 



45 



PROJECTED MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR 
NEW SCHOOL FACILITIES IN WILMINGTON 1958- 1971 (x) 



Probable 




Type of 


No. of 


Estimated 


Required for 


Priority 


Location 


School 


Classrooms 


Cost 


School Year 


1 (Actual) 


High School 


Addition 




$400, 000 


1958-59 


2 (Actual) 


Glen Road 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 


1959-60 


3 


Boutwell Street 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 


1960-61 


4 


West 


Intermediate 


10 


500, 000 


1961-62 


5 


Park St. 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 


1962-63 


6 


South 


Intermediate 


10 


500, 000 


1963-64 


7 


Hopkins St. 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 


1965-66 


8 


North 


Intermediate 


10 


500, 000 


1966-67 


9 


Ballardvale St. 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 


1967-68 


10 


West 


Addition 


10 


500, 000 


1968-69 


11 


South 


Addition 


10 


500, 000 


1970-71 


12 


Lowell St. 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 




13 


Butters Row 


Elementary 


12 


400, 000 




Totals 








$5, 700, 000 





(x) Data compiled and preliminary estimates prepared by Planning Board Consultants in consultation with 
School Department. 



The Permanent Building Committee would like to thank our advisory members for their con- 
tinued assistance and cooperation. The exchange of ideas between the various boards is most desirable 
and beneficial to the Town. Mr. Nicholas DeFelice of the Board of Selectmen, Mr. Edward Page of the 
School Committee, Mr. John Hayward of the Finance Committee, Mr. John Evans of the Planning Board, 
Mr. Alfred Calabrese former Town Manager, Mr. Cecil O. Lancaster, Town Manager; Mr. John Collins, 
Superintendent of Schools; Mr. James White, Superintendent of Streets; Mr. Paul Lynch, Chief of Police; 
Mr. Francis Downs, Superintendent of Parks and Cemeteries; Mr. Lawrence Cushing, Director of Recrea- 
tion; and Mr. Leo LeBlanc, Dog Officer, have all contributed their time and efforts wholeheartedly, and we 
are very grateful for their excellent support and help. 




Permanent Building Committee: left to right Edward F. Page, School Committee- 
Vincent R. McLain, Raymond G. McClure, John J. Collins, Supt. of Schools: 
Erwin Hanke, Chairman; Paul H. Niles, Secretary: and Joseph F. Courtney 



46 



highway department 



I 4 t » 

10 II ' n 

I* 1« 19 10 




HIGHWAY SUPERINTENDENT 
James H. White 



Regular routine work was carried on throughout the year; such as patching, cleaning culverts and 
catch basins, scraping and cleaning shoulders, brush cutting on all streets, hauling away and burning, and 
the erection of street and traffic signs. Two new fences were installed where needed. Brush spraying was 
continued even though the spring was very wet giving the new growth plenty of time to get underway. How- 
ever the results were satisfactory with very few complaints registered because of blind corners and carves 
due to brush. 

As in past years, the Highway Department again joined forces with the Tree Department in the re- 
moval of dead, diseased and dangerous trees. All street construction carried over from 1958 was com- 
pleted except Marcus Road due to inadequate funds. This should be completed in I960 because of better- 
ment charges. 

Chapter 90 Construction: 

Park Street completed at a cost of $9300 four catch basins, two manholes and 500 ft. of pipe 

were installed and 350 ft. of asphalt curbing laid. 

An island was installed at the bottom of Gowing Road to protect the vehicles coming out of Gowing 
Road from the through traffic. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance: 
(Available funds - $3300) 

Part of Shawsheen Avenue and Burlington Avenue were sealed with heavy asphalt, covered with pea 
gravel and rolled. Lowell Street (3000 ft. ) sealed with OA3 asphalt, covered with pretreated stone and rolled. 

All catch basins and culverts were cleaned. Brush was cut, hauled away and burned. 

Fairmeadow Road; 

Left unfinished in 1958, it was completed in every detail in 1959. Instead of back filling the asphalt 
curbing with gravel or subsoil, I used loam that was available from the Glen Road School. All excess loam 
is used by the Highway and Cemetery Departments. 



Shady Lane Drive, left unfinished in 1958, was finished in 1959 this being done under better- 



ments. 



47 



Beeching Avenue, being constructed under betterments, was not connpleted trees, stvimps and 

brush were removed subsoil excavated and backfilled with gravel it will be surface -treated in I960. 



The following new streets were completed in every detail and drainage installed where needed: 
Longview Road, Ledgewood Road and Hilltop Road. Glenview Road was not completed because of the large 
amount of ledge. However, I was able to remove all the ledge, subsoil and back gravel before the frost set 
in. It will be completed in I960. 



The ditch in the Hathaway Acres area was cleaned out from Woburn Street to the swamp. The ditch 
on the Alden Eames property was cleaned out and widened for a distance of 200 ft. thereby eliminating a 
flood condition on the Aldrich Road side of Shawsheen Avenue. 



Flooding and high water are becoming a greater problem each year. A drainage system and culverts 
are not the true answer. Low land, vacant five and ten years ago, is now being used for homes and develop- 
ments thereby compacting the swamps and raising the high water mark. It's a simple case of trying to empty 
a ten-quart pail of water into a six-quart container without having it run over. I receive many calls blaming 
the Highway Department for flooded cellars. I check the culverts and find them clear, and then I check the 
swamps and meadows and find that they are flooded. It boils down to the point that sooner or later the Town 
must start a land reclamation project by cleaning out its main ditches, brooks, and rivers so the water can 
flow freely and unchecked into the Ipswich River. 



Chapter 8 1 : 

Surface treated - heavy asphalt - back covered with stone and rolled: 



Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Beech Street 
Belmont Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Butters Row 
Carson Avenue 
Central Street 
Chapman Road 
Chase Road 
Concord Street 
Coolidge Road 
Cottage Street 
Cross St. Ext. 
Dayton Road 



Eames Street 
Essex Street 
Fairview Avenue 
Faulkner Road 
Forrest Street 
Glendale Circle 
Grand Street 
Grove Avenue 
Gunderson Road 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Street 
Highland Street 
Hillside Way 
Jones Avenue 
Lake Street 
Marion Street 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Middlesex Avenue 



Miller Road 
North Street 
Park Street 
Pershing Street 
Pilling Road 
Pineview Road 
Roman Way 
Sewall Road 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Sheridan Road 
State Street 
Swain Road West 
Truman Road 
Veranda Avenue 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
Woburn Street 



Reconstructed and surface treated: 



Bridge Lane (from Main Street Carter Lane Linda Road 

to Brand Avenue) Lincoln Street Oak Street 



Drainage Installed: 

Lockwood Road (300 ft. ) Oakdale Road (600 ft. ) Shawsheen Road (1400 ft. ) 

Regraveled and surface treated: 
Cedar Avenue 




Catch basin and/or culvert installed: 



Andover Street Burlington Avenue Chestnut Street West Street 

Miscellaneous: 

Some of the drainage was not installed because of inadequate funds, and this will be done in I960. 
I have 600 feet of granite curb on hand to be laid on Middlesex Avenue from the High School driveway to Wild- 
wood Street. This was not laid because of the cold weather. Site clearing and grading for the new Highway 
Garage and Police Station were done by the Highway Department with highway funds. 

As in the past, some work was requested by the School Maintenance Department such as hauling and 
spreading gravel at the Whitfield, Walker, Buzzell, Swain and Center Schools. The extension to the play area 
in back of the Center School was not finished. The school department has requested a roadway on town- 
owned land from the Buzzell School to the play area in back of the Swain and Center Schools. This could cost 
from $3000 to $4 DOO because of the existing condition of the land. The reason is to keep the school children 
off School Street during school hours. The roadway must be wide enough so that it can be plowed out after 
a snow storm. 

At this writing, most of the highway equipment is in very good condition. I have a 1947 International 
truck that I want to have replaced. The department has been operating under a severe handicap because we 
do not have a garage to house our equipment. However as of January 22 I have been able to get my equip- - 
ment under cover even though the garage is not heated and without lights. The steel strike caused a five - 
weeks delay, but I think that it will be completed by the middle of February. 

At this time I would like to take this opportunity to thank the various departments for their help and 
cooperation; also, the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their help, cooperation and understand- 
ing of the many problems confronting my department. 




New Public Works Garage 
Nearing Completion 



49 



board of li«'alfh 



HEALTH AGENT & SANITARIAN 
Patrick A. Thibeau 




The year 1959 saw the continuation of the community health program relating to communicable 



disease control, public health nursing, environmental sanitation with sanitary laboratory analysis. Preven- 
tive measures against communicable diseases afflicting children and infants were practiced through immuni 
zation and Salk polio clinics. Additional fourth Salk vaccine clinics were established in November for all 
eligible pre-school and first grade children. 



In this year, tuberculin testing of school children in selected grades was carried on in conjunction 



with the school department. The tuberculin test was recommended in place of chest X-rays for the detectioni 
of possible tuberculosis. All town physicians took time off their crowded schedules, to give freely of their 
time. To them we are extremely grateful for their invaluable assistance. 

For the information of interested citizens, the organization of the Board of Health is composed of 
the following: 



A resume of the activities carried on this year is as follows: 
A. Communicable Disease Control : 
I. Immunization Clinics 

Clinics were again held this year for the immunization of infants and pre-school children from 
three months to six years. All children attending these clinics received protection against 
diphtheria, tetanus (lock-jaw), and pertussis (whooping cough). Although these diseases are 
now virtually controlled, many cases still occur in children who have not received their 



Board of Health: 



Per sonnel: 



A. C. Walker, Chairman 
(Mrs. ) Marion Boylen 
Vinal E. Lewis 



Patrick A. Thibeau, M. S. 
Gerald A. Fagan, M. D. 
Anne E. Butters, R. N. 
Leo LeBlanc 

Gardiner Lester, D. V . M. 



Agent &£ Milk Inspector 
Medical Officer 
Public Health Nurse 
Animal & Slaughtering Insp. 
Veterinarian 



50 



fl 



innoculations . It is therefore very important that parents see that this is done, either by their own 
physicians or at one of these clinics. 



Total number of DPT clinics 5 

Children innoculated at clinics 125 

Children completing series of three doses 91 

Booster doses given 150 



II. Polio Innoculation Clinics 

Although a number of cities and towns in the Commonwealth felt that, with the completion of the mass 
polio innoculation program three years ago, there was no need to continue, it was the unanimous opinion 
of this board that such a program should continue as long as a need still existed and as long as attend- 
ance at the clinics warranted the expenditure of town funds. The program, upon state approval, was 
therefore enlarged to give fourth (4th) doses in November. 

Total number of clinics 6 
Total number of innoculations 670 

III. Anti -Rabies Clinic 

For the fifth consecutive year, an anti-rabies clinic was held in the late spring. Gardiner Lester, 
D. V. M. was the attending veterinarian. A total of 392 dogs received their anti-rabies innoculations. 
The cost of operating this clinic was defrayed by charging a nominal fee. 

Public Health Nursing: 

I. Public Health Nursing 

Nursing visits for year 1959 890 
Fees collected for visits $547 

This phase of the public health nurse's program includes all services connected with the care of the 
sick. It means either giving or arranging for necessary nursing care, teaching through demonstration 
and supervising care given by household members. It is offered only under the direction and guidance 
of a physician and is available to any person living in the Town of Wilmington. 

A breakdown of some of the major diseases for which these visits were made is as follows: 



Cardiac 




98 visits 


Cancer 




39 visits 


Arthritis 




97 visits 


Anemia 




91 visits 


Tuberculosis 




104 visits 


Surgery 




32 visits 


Diabetes 




46 visits 


Cardo- Vascula 


r Disorders 


240 visits 


Other diseases 


& conditions 


143 visits 



II. Child Care Agencies and Nursing Homes 

The licensing and supervision of agencies giving day care to children under seven years of age is the 
responsibility of the local Board of Health. I'he local Board must approve the application of a Nursing 
Home before a license is granted by the State Department of Public Health. Eight inspections were 
made in regard to these agencies. 



51 



III. Tuberculosis Report for 1959 



Total No. of Active Cases on Register 17 

Total No. of Active Cases Hospitalized 

New Cases Reported 

No. of Diagnosed Cases Visited 20 

Total No. of Visits made to diagnosed cases 116 

Total No. of Visits (suspects, cases, contacts) Z26 

No. of visits made to N. Reading State Sanatorium 26 

No, of visits made to Middlesex County Sanatorium 6 



In January a Tuberculin Testing Program was conducted in the schools. Nine hundred and thirty-four 
children were tested and arrangements for the follow-up of positive reactors to the test, and examina- 
tion of close contacts were made by the Public Health Nurse. 



Environmental Sanitation 



Environmental sanitation is the control and/or improvement of man's surroundings to better promote 
his physical well-being, comfort, and enjoyment of those surroundings. There are by necessity many 
aspects to environmental sanitation, but those functions generally practiced by this board concern them 
selves with water, milk, sewage, refuse disposal, housing and recreational area sanitation. 



I. Water Sanitation 



a. Private Wells 

Number of wells inspected 38 

Found satisfactory 18 

Found to be contaminated 20 

With the common usage of detergents for cleansing agents, it was found that such contamination could 
not be readily filtered by passing through soil as with bacteria. It was therefore necessary to combine 
detergent analysis with bacterial detection of water supplies. Householders are therefore advised that 
should they be serviced by wells on small lots 10, 000 square feet or less in area or have wells not 
farther than seventy-five (75) feet from sewerage systems, to notify the Board of Health for analysis of 
these wells. There is no charge or obligation to any citizen of the town for this service. 

b. Municipal System 



Periodic analysis of the town water supply is made by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 
A continuing examination of the town water is being done to ascertain the fluoride content. 

Total number of Fluoride Tests 168 

II. Milk Sanitation 

Licensed Dairies 20 

Pasteurization Plants Inspected 16 

Samples of Milk and Cream Analyzed 114 

Samples of Ice Cream Analyzed 4 

The bacterial range distribution of the milk and cream samples gave the following results upon analysis 



52 



Milk and Flavored Drinks 



- 500 colonies/cc 2 samples 

501 - 1,000 colonies/cc 18 samples 

1,001 - 5,000 colonies/cc 38 samples 

5,001 - 10,000 colonies/cc 21 samples 

10,001 - 15,000 colonies/cc* 2 samples 

15,001 or over colonies/cc* 11 samples 

*Massachusetts Department of Public Health standards for milk and flavored milk drinks are 10, 000 
bacterial colonies or less per cubic centimeter. 



Cream - All Grades 



- 1,000 colonies/cc 5 samples 

1,001 - 5,000- colonies/cc 10 samples 

5,001 - 10,000 colonies/cc 1 sample 

10,001 - 20,000 colonies/cc 2 samples 

20,001 - 40,000 colonies/cc 1 sample 

40,001 or over colonies/cc* 3 samples 



*Massachusetts Department of Public Health standards allow 40, 000 bacterial colonies or less per 
cubic centimeter for cream grades. 



III. Food S anitation 



Inspections 



Restaurants 18 

Soda Fountains 4 

Luncheonettes 8 

Submarine Sandwich Shoppes 6 

Grocery and Variety Stores 25 

Ice Cream Manufacturing Establishments 4 

School Cafeterias 5 

Other Places Dispensing Food 3 

Mobile Canteens 6 



Prior to issuance of permits for the current year, a number of establishments were notified of con- 
ditions that were unsatisfactory. These conditions were rectified by the operators to the satisfaction 
of the Board of Health. 



Utensils used by the public were periodically tested for bacterial content to determine the efficiency 
of dishwashing and handling. The purpose of this was to discover and prevent the transmission of 
diseases through these utensils. 



IV. Sewage Disposal Sanitation 



Applications for sewerage permits 16 2 

Sewerage permits granted for: 

Older dwellings 17 

New dwellings 12 8 

Commercial establishments 4 

Industries 1 

Municipal buildings 4 



53 



IV. Sewage Disposal Sanitation (continued) 



Sewerage systems inspected and approved 139 
Lots restricted for building 3 
Lots on which restrictions removed 7 

V. Refuse Disposal 

Garbage collections and rubbish disposal (through the operation of the town dump) are administered by- 
contract through the Board of Health. These public works functions account for over 60% of the total 
Board of Health budget. Inquiries concerning these services should be made to this office. 

In an attempt to depart from the burning open-faced dump, a sanitary land-fill operation was employed 
this year. In this operation, the rubbish is compressed by a clam shovel and covered with good earth 
material such as gravel, at the end of each day. Due to the inexperience of the parties concerned, 
there was some time before the desired operation was obtained but having thus attained it, the opera- 
tion is proceeding very well. Thus, in time, a low section can be filled in, utilized as an industrial 
site, and bring much more revenue to the town. 

VI. Recreational Area Sanitation 

Sanitation at any public or private recreational area is regulated by the Board of Health. Water sup- 
plies must be safe, sewage disposal must be sanitary, and bathing waters must not be so contaminated 
as to be injurious to swimmers. There are three recreational areas in town: 

Silver Lake - public 

Camp Forty Acres - Boy and Girl Scout Camp 
Mill Brook Camp - Commercial and semi-private 

Analyses of the bathing waters at Silver Lake were again made this year. The following is the result 
of water samples from the lake on dates specified: 

Date M. P. N. * Date M. P. N. * 



6/15/59 93 7/20/59 1200 

6/17/59 260 8/12/59 2100 

6/22/59 93 8/19/59 490 

II 1/59 490 8/24/59 700 
240 

*M. P. N. represents the number of intestinal bacteria of the coliform found in 100 cc. of water. 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health regards M. P. N. of 2400 or more as possibly dan- 
gerous for swimming. 

VII. Housing Sanitation 

In connection with the housing code, a number of dwellings were repaired, remodeled, or torn down. 

Total Dwellings Inspected 11 

Minor violations found 3 

Major violations found 8 

Condemned 8 

Dwellings vacated and posted 8 

Violations corrected 1 



54 



VIII. Nuisance Complaints 



In this period, sixty-eight complaints were received and investigated. 



Complaint 

Sewage 

Dumping 

Unprotected wells , excavations, etc. 

Animals 

Food 

Housing 

Atmospheric pollution 
Inadequate or unsafe water 
Insect Infestation 
Milk 



Number 
23 ' 
14 

3 

1 

2 

9 
12 

2 

1 

1 



Abated 
19 
12 
3 
1 
2 
4 
7 
2 
1 
1 



IX. Miscellaneous Inspections 



Town Dvimp 
Recreational Camps 



45 
6 



Piggeries 
Stables 



16 
12 



Laboratory 

A total of 931 bacteriological and chemical analyses were made this year on water and milk samples 
as well as the surfaces of multi-used food utensils (glasses, forks, plates, etc. ) by the Health Agent. 



No. 



Satisfactory 



% Satisfactory 



Milk and Cream 

Private Wells 

Recreational Camp Wells 

Silver Lake 

Restaurant Utensils 

Schools: 

1/2 pt. school milk 
Cafeteria utensils 

Frozen Desserts 



278 
425 

42 
135 

24 

12 

3 
12 



256 
227 

31 
135 

17 

12 
3 
12 



92. 1 
51. 
73. 8 
100. 
70. 8 

100. 
100. 
100. 



Permits and Licenses 

Permits and licenses granted by the Board of Health after inspection and approval: 



Refuse transportation permits 20 

Whlse. Manufacture of Ice Cream 1 

Retail Manufacture of Ice Cream 2 

Milk Dairy Licenses 20 

Milk Store Licenses 38 

Oleomargarine Licenses 16 

Sewerage Installation Permits 154 



Piggeries 

Child Care Centers 
Funeral Directing 
Stable Licenses 
Food permits 
Dumps 
Camps 



14 
4 
3 
11 
58 
2 
2 



In conclusion, the Board of Health and its personnel wish to express their gratitude to the many 
individuals of the Town for their aid and cooperation. The Board of Health is especially indebted to 
those ladies who so ably assisted at the immunization and polio clinics. 



55 



board of public welfare 



I 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WELFARE 
Andrew P. Ring 




The Wilmington Board of Public Welfare respectfully submits its Annual Report for the year 1959. 
The Board consists of Mr. Maurice O'Neil, Chairman, Miss Florence Balkus and Mrs. Anna Low. 

Each year, in writing this report, the same questions arise - do the citizens understand Public 

Assistance, are they satisfied with the administration of the local program and do they approve the large ex- ; 

penditures of money? Then the problem that confronts the Board is how to explain the program, so that the , 

citizens may understand what it is all about. i 

The various categories of assistance under the supervision of the Board are General Relief, Aid to 
Dependent Children, Disability Assistance and Old Age Assistance. The last three (3) are part of the Social 
Security Act. Aid to Dependent Children and Old Age Assistance were born during the severe economic de- , 
pression, in the belief that public assistance would be a diminishing program, while the social insurance 
would be the basic program; but it has not worked out in that way. Many types of employment are not covered, 
under the present Social Security Act, and the present grants under the Old Age & Survivor's Insurance pro- 
gram are not sufficient to provide for the individual's needs, and therefore they are required to seek public 
assistance in addition to their Social Security grants, to meet the present costs of living. Under the present 
laws governing the administration of public relief, all needs are met - there is no maximum amount. This 
means that an individual's needs, to include medical, hospital and all other services are provided, in addition.j 
to the needs in the home. i ., 

It is believed that no private business and few public organizations could have survived the brand of , ^ 
publicity Public Welfare has had since its beginning. The emphasis has always been on the cost - never on , ^ 
what the public gets for its money. The truth is that Public Welfare does not cost - it pays. It pays in actual 
dollars and cents of the taxpayer's money, besides the priceless human values which it conserves. Perhaps 
this best could be explained where the granting of assistance has seen many families rehabilitated because the^ j. 
were able to get help when illness or accident to the breadwinner presented emergencies they could not cope 
with unaided. In these emergencies, which are major threats to family security, besides the financial help 
given, there is the stabilizing influence of the social service rendered by the workers who go in on the case. 
By financial assistance in these cases, the children are able to have sufficient food, decent shelter and ade- 
quate clothing, which enables them to continue in school and become useful citizens of the Community. 

56 1 



Another reason for the increase in the case load and costs of public assistance, is the increased 
life span of the average individual. In 1900, the average length of life was 49 years. In 1955 it was 66. In 
1900 one person in twenty-five (25) was 65 years of age or older. In 1980 it is estimated that the ratio will be 
one in ten. As people become older, their medical needs change, and they require more medical service. As 
the average citizen well knows, the costs of medical services have increased and of course has resulted in a 
large increase, when you consider a large number of cases at one time. Medical science has, of course, made 
a great deal of progress and has reduced many diseases which were once fatal, to a point where - if properly 
cared for - can now be cured. For the aged and chronically ill there is no well planned or integrated service. 
Unfortunately, they find refuge in general hospitals, convalescent homes and homes for the aged. The ma- 
jority have worked steadily and productively in a society that respects only the productive, and the ending of 
ability to do gainful work is for most aged persons a tragedy. It symbolizes the end of independence and pur- 
pose in life. Unfortunately, at present, there does not seem to be any way to work out a program to care for 
this type of aged person in need, because old people fear isolation and want to be near relatives and friends. 
They like to be around where they can associate with their old friends, and they like to attend the church where 
they have been in attendance for many years. To accomplish good social work, it is best that they should have 
a home of their own, or live with relatives or friends as long as they are capable to, in some way, care for 
themselve s. 

More than six million persons (Social Security Bulletin 1958) were receiving public assistance; 
almost Z. 5 million aged with an average payment of $61. 79; almost 750,000 families (three million recipients) 
receiving A. D. C. with an average payment of $103. 26 per family; 109, 000 blind with an average of $66. 98 
per month; 321, 000 permanently andtotally disabled receiving only $60. 85; and 381, 000 cases receiving gener- 
al assistance with an average payment per case of $61.43. Public assistance represents the only available 
income to approximately 80 per cent ol these families. 

Public Welfare: 

During 1959 there were 29 cases aided under this category in Wilmington with an expenditure of 
!$7, 818. 47. This Agency paid $2, 634. 45 to other communities for aiding Wilmington settled cases. The total 
expenditure for this type of assistance during 1959 was $10, 452. 92. The right to apply for public welfare is a 
Legal right which a citizen has. Assistance under this program is granted to individuals who are not eligible 
for other types of assistance. In most cases, applications are received from individuals due to sickness or 
unemployment. They are not constant cases and sometimes receive assistance for a short period of time 
only. There has been an increase in the number of welfare cases aided during the last several years. This 
is due to the population increase in this Community. This is the only category of relief in which the Federal 
Government does not participate. They do not reimburse in any welfare case for aid, or for administration 
;osts. 

Aid To Dependent Children: 

During 1959 the local Board aided 22 cases under this program. The total expenditure amounted to 
528,902. 96. The costs of this program were shared by the Federal Government, the State and the local 
Community. Aid to Dependent Children is provided in cases where there is a widow with dependent children 
vho are in attendance at public schools and when families have been deserted. It is also granted to a family 
vhere the parent is physically incapacitated, and the medical report shows that the duration of disability will 
•xtend for a period in excess of three (3) months. 

Federal reimbursement received during the year is held in a special account by the Town Account- 
nd and is used for this program only. The State share of reimbursement cannot be credited to this account 
nd therefore goes to the Excess & Deficiency account of the town as an estimated receipt. 

Disability Assistance: 

This program is part of the Social Security Act. A person must be 18 years of age or over, to have 
Ived in Massachusetts continuously for one year immediately preceding the date of application for assistance 



57 



and to be in need of aid. This category came into effect in November of 1951 and is to provide for needy per- 
sons found to be permanently and totally disabled. 

During 1959, seven cases have received a direct grant from this Board at a total cost of $9, 123. 41. 
Federal reimbursement received during the year is held in a special account by the Town Accountant and is 
used for this program only. 

Old Age Assistance: 

To be eligible for Old Age Assistance, which is also part of the Social Security Act, a person in 
Massachusetts must be 65 years of age, to have lived in the Commonwealth three out of the last nine years - 
one year immediately preceding the date of application - and to be in need of assistance. There are also other 
eligibility requirements such as personal property and amount of income, which must be considered before the 
local Board can render a just decision. 

During 1959, there were 110 cases aided by the Wilmington Board of Public Welfare under this cate- 
gory, at a cost of $91, 779- 71. This Community also had to reimburse other communities at a cost of 
$1, 915. 01. Total expenditure for Old Age Assistance during 1959 was $93, 694. 72. Old Age Assistance is 
part of the Social Security Act, and the costs are shared by the Federal Government, State and local Commun- 
ity where the person is legally settled. The Federal reimbursement is retained in a special account - the 
same as Aid to Dependent Children and Disability Assistance - and is used over again by this Board. The 
State share and the money received from other cities and towns for cases aided in Wilmington are credited to 
the Excess and Deficiency Account, as estimated receipts. 

Administration Costs: 



The term "Administration Costs" covers all expenditures of the Board to administer the four pro- 
grams under the Board's supervision, which are Old Age Assistance, Disability Assistance, Aid to Dependent 
Children and Public Welfare. The Federal Government does not participate in the costs of administering the 
Welfare program, but does the other three (3) categories. Federal reimbursement is based on home visits 
and all contact with cases in the office. 

The Social Security Act requires all employees of the Board to be under Civil Service, and salaries 
must conform to the Civil Service Compensation Plan (minimum). Old Age Assistance and Disability Assist- 
ance cases must be visited semi-annually, Aid to Dependent Children cases every four months, and General 
Relief are seen or contacted weekly. The three employees in the local Welfare office are Andrew P. Ring, 
who is the Director of Public Assistance and Secretary to the Welfare Board; Mrs. Miriam Sullivan is the 
Senior Clerk and Stenographer; Miss Helen Hobson is the Social Worker. 

It should be remembered that general economic conditions govern the expenditures required and un- 
fortunately the expenses of the Board of Public Welfare are always the greatest when the economic conditions 
of the Country are bad, and when the taxpayer can least afford to pay the high cost. 

The local Board wants to take this opportunity to thank the following for their cooperation during 
1959: The Fire Department, Wilmington -Tewksbury Knights of Columbus, employees of Avco, Community 
Fund, Rotary Club, Lions, Wilmington-Tewksbury Lodge of Elks. 

This report has been prepared for the local Board of Public Welfare by Andrew P. Ring, Director 
of Public Assistance. 



58 



school maintenance department 



Buzzell School: 

Rear door refitted and new hinges installed 
Replaced 22 ft. of one -inch steel pipe 
Installed spring on boiler roonn door 
Manufactured "No Admittance" sign for same 
Installed new program clock 

Installed new self-closing faucets in boys' and girls' 

lavatorie s 
New fire alarm system installed 
Installed rebuilt water cooler 

Center School: 

Upright valve in cellar repaired 
Ceiling repaired in cellar where coal bin was 
removed 

All cracks in cellar wall pointed up 
Floor cemented where necessary 

All classroom doors refitted and new locks installed 
Roof pigeon-proofed 

All asbestos shingles replaced and repainted 
Fireproof panels installed in doors 
Wire glass installed 

Removed double doors and replaced with single 

fire -proofed doors 
New fire alarm system installed 

High School: 

All filters cleaned and re -oiled 

All boilers and burners reserviced 

Fire wall in boilers checked 

All doors in "old wing" resealed 

All cracks in gymnasium filled and painted 

Walls in cafeteria painted 

Three coats of non-skid paint applied on kitchen fir. 

Ceilings over all stairways painted 

Walls in locker rooms painted 

All loose tiles replaced 

Skylight in locker room painted 

Bleachers in gymnasium resealed 

First wing library painted complete 

Doors in locker rooms and gymnasium corridors 

resealed 
Doors in cafeteria painted 

Ceiling blocks in Rooms 206 and 210 replaced where 
loose 

59 



High School (continued): 

Hole in wall cemented, Room 210 
Window lock replaced, Room 210 

Thirty tables stripped, sanded and refinished complete 
Identification and room numbers manufactured and 

installed in new addition 
Ten door -check springs installed 
Mop wringer assembly repaired 
Potato masher repaired 

Beading rear door boys' locker room repaired 
Replaced fan in boys' locker room 
Washed and sealed 24 doors in second wing 
Two hundred combination desk and chair sets 

stripped and sanded 
Textolite tops pressed on and refinished complete 
Anchored loose chairs in auditorium 
Resealed and repainted all skylights 
Installed blackout curtains in gymnasium 
Athletic equipment manufactured and supplied for 

girls' gym 
New drinking fountain installed 

Rogers School - Room #1: 

All old desks and chairs removed and replaced with 

new movable furniture 
Fluorescent lighting installed 

Removed all old seal and wax resealed and rewaxed 
Room painted complete 

Rooms #2, 3, and 4: 

Same work as above, with the exception of lighting 

and fixtures 
All loose tile replaced 
One toilet repaired 

Circline fluorescent lighting installed in passageways 

Passageway and radiators painted complete 

All entrance and exit doors painted 

Flag pole painted 

Play yard area shortened 

Two new gates installed 

Slide painted complete 

New drinking fountain installed 

New rear steps and platform installed 

Boiler cleaned and re-serviced 

Fireproof door installed in crawl space 



Swain School - Rooms #201, 202, 205: 



Wildwood School (continued): 



New radiators installed 

Registers repaired to prevent drafts 

New chalkboard in Room 205 installed 

Wire glass installed in doors 

Program clock installed 

Tankless water heater repaired 

Lock installed, second floor stock room 

132 desks stripped, sanded and refinished complete 

Rooms #201 , 203: 

Old desks and chairs removed and replaced with 

refinished ones 
Floor renailed 

New fire alarm system installed 

New platforms and steps installed in gymnasium 

Gymnasium floor painted 

Two new toilet seats installed 

Walker School: 

All classroom doors refitted and new locks installed 
Panels in doors fireproofed 
Wire glass installed 
Cafeteria floor repainted 

Repaired roof and gutter in rear of building 
New fire alarm system installed 

West School: 

Panels in front door repaired 

Light switch in hall repaired 

All plaster refinished where necessary 

Three bookcases manufactured and installed 

Radiator flushed out and new valve installed 

New flag pole installed complete 

Repaired all stairways 

Boiler flushed out and cleaned 

Pin-up boards supplied and installed 

Wildwood School: 

Hot top front entrance repaired 

Lines repainted, teachers' parking area 

Movable shelves supplied 

All natural wood doors revarnished 

Outside doors painted 

Boiler nipples repaired 

Curbing repaired, south wing exit 

Playground equipment painted 

Play yard filled in 

Two bookcases manufactured and installed 
Exhaust fan installed in teachers' room 
Incinerator repaired 



Electric fan installed in cellar for ventilation of 
same 

Cinder block storeroom installed in cellar 
Retaining wall installed and dry well provided for 
pump 

Edge of roof resurfaced with fiberglass insulation, 
and two coats of roofing cement sealer brushed 
on 

New valve control installed in hot water boiler 
Two trap doors installed to reach water lines 
Water lines in cellar covered with insulation 
Switch on pump repaired 
All loose tile replaced 

Hot water booster installed to increase hot water 

to dishwashing machine 
Flooring removed and replaced, and tile installed 

in places where dry rot was found. 

Whitefield School: 

Hallway ceiling repaired 

Floor boards replaced in hallway 

Stairs renailed 

Parting beads installed 

Playground slide painted 

Fluorescent lighting installed, first grade classroor 
Floor replaced, sanded and refinished complete 
Basement stairway wall rock-lathed and plastered 
Holes in basement floor filled in 

Two-inch main installed connecting boys and girls 

lavatorie s 
Cleaned and adjusted flushometers 
Installed set traps, second floor 
Fireproof door installed in crawl space 
Installed finned pipe radiation under boys and girls 

lavatorie s 

Two springs installed on boiler room doors 
Toilet seat installed 

Manufactured and installed one "No Admission" 
sign 

All loose and broken shingles replaced and painted 
Room #2, all old desks and chairs removed and 
replaced with new movable furniture 

Roman House: 

Observation tower removed and trap door installed 

All roof eaves pigeon-proofed 

First floor radiators painted 

Three electric outlets installed 

Supervisor's room painted complete 

Removed panels and set glass in front door 

Overhauled hot water system 



60 



Glen Road School: 



Miscellaneous: 



Installed first aid cabinets, soap, towel , etc. where 
nece s sary 

Manufactured and installed all identification signs 
Manufactured four pin-up boards and installed same 
Removed from cartons, assembled and set-up new 

furniture in all rooms 
Installed flag brackets, and flags in all rooms 
Installed pencil sharpeners in all rooms 
Moved all supplies from part-time session schools 

Town Hall: 



Four steel lock bars for file cabinets installed 

Installed new lock - Town Manager's office 

Installed new lock in cabinet room 

Letter box assembly in Civil Defense office 

Book shelves manufactured and installed - engineer's 

office 
Roof repaired 

Drilled holes in steel safe doors for ventilation 
Manufactured roll-out table for record books 
Set up and removed voting booth equipment for town 
elections 

Assembled and set up desk in Assessor's office 



A general painting, patching and touch-up in all 
schools 

Two "stop" signs manufactured and installed at 

approaches to Center and Buzzell Schools 
Twelve roll-out stands manufactured for TV sets 
Window glass installed in all schools where necessary 

In addition, the following items were completed in 
or on all buildings in the system 

Cleaned and overhauled boilers on hot water systems 
All pin-up boards in all classrooms repainted 
All school warning signs painted 
All chalkboards cleaned and treated 
All wooden platforms and steps treated with a pro- 
tective coat of preservative 
All windows washed 

All septic tanks checked and cleaned out when 
nece s sary 

All storage rooms inspected and cleaned 
All schools inspected for sand and rock salt 
All schools inspected for fire protection 
All fire extinguishers checked and refilled. 



Thank you all departments for your cooperation. Maintenance involves many and various skills. 

It is our aim to perform our duties efficiently and economically. 




MAINTENANCE SUPERINTENDENT 
Anton Thiel 



board of library trustees 



It is always interesting to look back over the year and sum up the activities of the Public Library, 
particularly when each year offers further evidence of the importance of library services. In 1959 for the 
first time we had a full-time Librarian, and the statistics show that she could not have had many dull mo- 
ments. On the busiest day 353 books were taken out. The number of new borrowers reached a record high 
of 747, bringing the total number to 4800, an increase of 18% over 1958. Book circulation exceeded that of 
1958 by 22%, and the trend is more vividly demonstrated by the fact that the circulation has doubled since 
1955. 

In view of the above figures we are making plans to have the Library open additional hours next year 
so that it will be available every weekday. 

The State Bookmobile, in its second year of operation, has continued to furnish a most valuable ser- 
vice for which we are very grateful. The circulation of over 3500 books indicates how much this additional 
facility is enjoyed. 

We acknowledge with deep appreciation the many benefits provided by the Friends of the Wilmington 
Public Library, a committee organized by the Wilmington Women's Club. Through their efforts a rare 
old book entitled "Life of Asa G. Sheldon: Wilmington Farmer" was reprinted and the Library now possesse 
several copies. With the cooperation of the Library staff the Friends held a very successful Book Fair in 
the Library in November. Many books were sold for Christmas giving. The Library is also indebted to 
them for the two handsome window boxes which improve its appearance so much. 

We wish to compliment Mrs. C. Chipman, Librarian, and Mrs. F. Balser, Assistant Librarian, on 
their completion of additional courses in library subjects. 

LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Books added to the Library 1, 523 

Compton's Encyclopedia 20 volumes 

Records added: Single 40 

Album s 7 

Books circulated: Library 38, 189 

Bookmobile 3, 545 

Periodicals circulated 1, 166 

Records circulated 1,069 

New borrowers 747 

Fines collected $669.77 



The increase in the circulation at the Library during 1959 was 7, 041 and in that of the Bookmobile 
508, making a total increase of 7, 549- The increase in the periodical circulation was 50 and in the record 
circulation 309. 

The reference collection has been considerably increased and is very much in use. Classes from 
several schools have visited the Library, and the books were sent to the Whitefield School. Bus pupils fronr 
the nearby schools are dismissed in time to borrow books. 

62 



The State Division of Library Extension from its headquarters in Boston, and the Regional Library 
in North Reading, are of inestimable help in obtaining advice and information and borrowing books which are 
not in this Library. 

The Story Hour for Children of pre-school age, which was started in October and is held on alternate 
Tuesdays at 10. 30 A. M. , is very popular. The total registration is 28, and the average attendance is 
eighteen or twenty. 



recreation eomtnission 



The program has been run with the same aims and objectives as previously outlined in annual reports. 
However, there has been a steady increase in participation, and future plans will necessitate the use of other 
areas such as the Glen Road School and the Boutwell School. 

Our program is outlined as follows: 

A. Summer Season C. Playground Enrollment 



Silver Lake Beach Wildwood School 120 

Softball league for adults High School 378 

Four playgrounds for children Mildred Rogers School 485 

High School Field 97 

B. Fall and Winter Season D. Silver Lake Beach Activity 

Gym Programs at the High School Largest gathering 1200 

Daily average 500 

a. Ladies night Beginner's Lessons 146 

b. Thursday and Saturday for men Life-saving Classes 38 

c. Saturday afternoons for boys 

d. Winter Skating Carnival E- Softball League 154 



The commission has kept in mind both its responsibilities in presentation of programs, and the town's 
economic limitations. Much of our success has been made possible through the cooperation of the Planning 
Board, the Board of Health, the School Department, and forward-thinking officials of the Town of Wilmington. 
To you, and to the other town officials we are grateful, and we look forward to continued progress and 
success. 

f 



63 





JURY LIST 






Revised - August 14, 1959 




Name 


Re sidence 


Occupation 


*Ainsworth, Lillian 


15 Shawsheen Road 


Housewife 


*Andersen, Dorothy R. 


Park Street 


Housewife 


Anderson, William A. 


Westdale Avenue 


Supervisor 


Babine, Wilfred M. 


56 High Street 


Stationary Engineer 


*Backman, Hazel E. 


151 Chestnut Street 


Housewife 


*Baldwin, Gertrude E. 


7 Jones Avenue 


Sale slady 


Barton, Joseph J. 


104 West Street 


Maintenance 


Beers, William A. 


3 Truman Road 


Electrical Engineer 


Bennett, Richard E. 


44 Columbia Street 


Offset Feeder 


Berry, Willaim 


97 Nichols Street 


Aircraft Maint. Mechanic 


Biggar , Ralph H. 


27Z Middlesex Ave. 


Security Analyst 


Billings, Weyman H. 


21 Strout Avenue 


Technical Engineer 


=:=Bischoff, Alice B. 


56 Burlington Avenue 


Housewife 


Bischoff, Otto F. 


56 Burlington Avenue 


Retired 


Blakeslee, William R. 


10 Hathaway Road 


Foreman 


*Boylen, Marion C. 


22 Williams Avenue 


Housewife 


*Braman, Marion V. 


4 Fairmeadow Road 


Accts. Receivable Clerk 


Buckle, Thomas G. 


80 Church Street 


Clerk 


*Butt, Rose V. 


1 Dayton Road 


Housewife 


Cantrell, Cecil W, Jr. 


42 Andover Street 


Fiscal Officer 


■<Za.se , Mary G. 


2 Glenview Road 


Housewife 


Gates, Howard L. 


3 Sheridan Road 


Safety Engineer 


Chamberlin, Austin F. 


2 Glendale Circle 


Factory Worker 


Childs, William G. 


8 Linda Road 


Central Office Switchman 


'iCurtin, Pauline A. 


261 Glen Road 


Housewife 


Coursey, Charles H. 


Wing Road 


Asst. Section Head 


Cox, David M. 


216 Wildwood Street 


Television Writer &c Teacher 


'■Creelman, Alice M. 


571 Woburn Street 


Housewife 


Cutter, Harry J. 


17 Belmont Avenue 


Carpenter 


Cyrus, George S. 


McDonald Road 


Chef 


Deming, Christine M. 


56 Federal Street 


Housewife 


Denault, Noah F. 


5 Glendale Circle 


Shipper 


DeVita, Francis L. 


10 Lockwood Road 


Machinist 


Dowling, Laurence H. 


4 Hawthorne Road 


Operations Analyst 


*Drover, Dorothy E. 


4 Hilltop Road 


Nurse' s Aid 


Eisener, Warren R. 


11 Jere Road 


Manuf. Engineering Planning 


Elliott, John E. 


102 Lake Street 


Maintenance 


Elwell, Russell T. 


Shady Lane Drive 


Yard Foreman 


Erickson, Hartley C. 


580 Woburn Street 


Machinist 


Evans, Royal H. Jr. 


707 Woburn Street 


General Manager 


*Fay, Isabelle R. 


18 Brand Avenue 


Asst. Bookkeeper 


Foye , John E. 


73 West Street 


Shipwright 


Fritz, Ferdinand E. 


18 Fairmeadow Road 


Millman 


Frost, Doris P. 


127 Church Street 


Housewife 


*Fuller, Mary L. 


147 Main Street 


Meat packer 


Gerhartz, Conrad J. 


Pleasant Road 


App. & Methods Planning 


Gillis, Alexander 


Randolph Road 


Retired 


Gomes, Louis V. Jr. 


1 4 Marion Street 


Cabinet Finisher 


Gustus, Walter J. 


16 Brand Avenue 


Foreman 


Hodgdon, Parker E. 


7 Harris Street 


Asst. Engineer 


Huntley, Nelson F. 


109 Burlington Ave. 


Short Order Cook 


'■Hupper, Kathleen R. 


137 West Street 


Housewife 


Irwin, John R. 


17 Glendale Circle 


Piping Designer 


Irwin, William K. 


9 Glendale Circle 


Electrical Engineer 


*Jepson, Mildred L. 


136 Eames Street 


Saleswoman 


Johnston, Frederick T. 


i Fairmeadow Road 


Laborer 



64 



Name 



Residence 



Occupation 



Johnson, George F. Jr. 

Keen, Williann J. 

Kelleher, Robert G. 

Keller, Richard D. 

Kemp, John S. 
=:K:endall, Gladys M. 
-■^Kitchener , Ruth M. 

Lacey, Thomas A. 

Lawrence, Robert H. 
*Leavitt, Hazel M. 

Leonard, Thomas P. Jr. 

Lewis, Vinal E. 
*Low, Anna M. 

Lyons, Alta 

Malone, Albert D. 

Maloney, Robert 
'^'Mayo, Eleanor W. 

McCabe, Robert W. 

McLean, Frank H. 

McLellan, George H. Jr. 
'^'McLellan, Lurlyne B. 
'i'Melanson, Ann L. 

Melanson, Robert L. 
*Mills, Florence E. 

Moore, Arthur 

Moore, Thomas H. 

Murphy, Francis L. 

Oatley, George L. 

Oberg, Carl H. 

O'Leary, Phyllis M. 
=>0'Neil, A. Josephine 

Palmer, James T. 

Perry, Robert E. 

Piatt, Alans on E. 
'^'Porter, Florence V. 

Ree s , John F . 
*Reid, Josephine M, 

Ricceiii, Carmen J. 
*Riley, Veronica A. 

Robinson, Frank E. 

Ross, Ethel M. 

Russell, William H. 

Seitz, Ernest R. 
^Shanniak, Mabel M. 

Sharp, Norman R. 

Sharp, Walter E. 

Sheehan, Frederick 
"•■Skoglund, Mary G. 

Solow, Harry, Jr. 

Steeves, Glenn J. 

Stewart, Ervyl H. 

Stowe, Ernest B. 

Trickett, David W. 
"iWagstaff, Anna 

Wagstaff, Bernard F. 

Webber, George J. 
Weed, John E. 
Young, Ruth M. 

♦Indicates married woman 



Chase Street 
Westdale Avenue 

3 Coolidge Road 

4 West Street 
150 West Street 
291 Woburn Street 
Aldrich Road 
93A West Street 

1 1 Linda Road 

9 Hathaway Road 
7 Fairfield Road 
72 Church Street 
585 Woburn Street 

6 Fairmeadow Road 
135 Church Street 
Birchwood Road 

16 Suncrest Avenue 
403 Woburn Street 
32 Salem Street 
13 Ferguson Road 

13 Ferguson Road 

20 Ballardvale Street 
Fairview Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 

5 Ledgewood Road 

14 Gunderson Road 

7 Carson Avenue 
142 West Street 

Perry Avenue Extension 
44 Swain Road 
25 High Street 
124 West Street 
Taplin Avenue 

5 Sheridan Road 
Longview Road 
34 Andover Street 

216 Lowell Street 

95 Shawsheen Avenue 

2 Cottage Street 
Bates Avenue 

96 Grove Avenue 

10 Wildwood Street 
7 1 1 Woburn Street 
109 West Street 
Larson Road 
Larson Road 

123 West Street 
14 Suncrest Avenue 
Salem Street 
38 Marcus Road 

6 Kelley Road 

3 Meadow Lane 

11 Suncrest Avenue 
34 Hobson Avenue 
Pleasant Road 

160 Shawsheen Avenue 

2 Essex Street 

430 Middlesex Avenue 

65 



Postal Worker 
Insurance Underwriter 
Methods Analyst 
Newspaper Web Pressman 
Chief Engineer 
Housewife 
Housewife 

Oil Burner Serviceman 
Clerk, Timekeeper 
Housewife 

Prod. Planning & Control Supr. 

Travel Agent 

Customs Clerk 

Salesperson 

Real Estate Broker 

Rural Carrier 

Housewife 

Transmissionman 

Metal's Processing Tech. 

Project Engineer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Brick Layer 

Housewife 

Instrument Maker 

Checker 

Building Custodian 

Welder 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Lineman 

Carpenter 

Asst. Civil Engineer 
Registered Nurse 
I. B. M. Supervisor 
Stenographer 
P. O. Clerk 
Housewife 

Supervisor of Maintenance 
General Office Worker 
Clerk 
Salesman 

Accts. Rec. Bookkeeper 

Bakery Receiver 

General Helper 

Truck Driver 

Telephone Operator 

General Worker 

Body Man and Painter 

Civil Engineer 

Campaign Organizer 

Electrician 

Housewife 

Salesmanager 

Equip. Planning Engineer 

Maintenance 

Receptionist 



Dog Licenses 1152 

Kennels $50. 00 

25.00 

10.00 

Dogs Confined 289 

Complaints Covered 576 

Dogs Destroyed 

Dogs Disposed of 246 

Dogs Killed by Cars 76 

Resident Calls for Licenses 331 



inspector of animals 



Dog bites reported 106 

Dogs showing physical signs of rabies 

Animals submitted to laboratory for examination 
(All biting animals were quarantined for the period of time prescribed 
by law. ) 

Animals Quarantined 106 

Animals Released from quarantine 106 

Dogs released from interstate shipment 

Laboratory Report: Positive 

Negative 

Premises keeping domestic animals inspected 51 

Cattle inspected 127 

Horses inspected 59 

Swine inspected 3982 

Goats inspected 10 

Sheep inspected 21 

Cattle released from interstate shipment 

Cattle reacting to the tubercxilin test 



All special work assigned to me by the Department of Livestock Disease Control and the 
Board of Health was attended to promptly. 



SLAUGHTERING INSPECTOR: No slaughtering for 1959 



66 



board of cemetery commissioners! 




CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 
Francis Downs 



It was with a feeling of regret that the Commissioners received a letter of resignation from Supt. 
Ernest W. Eames. In view of declining health, he felt that he would not be able to supervise cemetery- 
operations in the efficient manner he had always employed, and concluded it would be best for both himself 
and the town if he offered his resignation. Mr. Eames had served Wildwood Cemetery in this capacity since 
1943. It was with reluctance that the resignation was accepted on February 12, 1959. 

On February 13, 1959, after giving his application careful consideration the commissioners and the 
town manager appointed Francis E. Downs to fill the vacancy. Francis had been working for Mr. Eames 
for over ten years. 

In 1959, two avenues were hot topped: from the main entrance on Middlesex Avenue to the Maple 
Avenue gateway on Wildwood Street a distance of 1100 ft. It is the commissioners' intentions to pave a few 
roadways each year. During the past year, improvements were made in the Old Cemetery on Middlesex 
Avenue and to the old section in back of the Town Hall. We hope to continue this work in the future. 

At the present time we have only seven single graves left therefore, we are planning to set up a new 
section in I960. It is also necessary to develop another area for family lots. This piece of land is now 
under construction. 

We wish to extend our thanks to the Town Manager and other Town Officials for the interest which 
they have given to the Commissioners and the Department. The cooperation which we received from other 
town departments was also accepted with utmost appreciation. 



BURIALS IN WILMINGTON CEMETERY 



Wilmington Residents died in Wilmington 
Wilmington Residents died elsewhere 
Non-residents 



16 
25 
3j_ 
72 



67 



Street 
Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Auburn Avenue 
Ayotte Street 

Baker Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Bancroft Street 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Beaching Avenue 
Belmont Avenue 
Birchwood Road 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Burnap Street 
Burt Road 
Butters Row 



From To 

Parker Street 
Billerica Line 
Andover Line 



Miles Feet 



Middlesex Ave. 
Shaw she en Ave. 
Salem Street 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 

Brand Avenue 
Salem Street 
Liberty Street 
Church Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Cunningham Street 
Columbia Street 
Judith Road 
Aldrich Road 
B ridge Lane 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Woodside Avenue 
Main Street 
Carmel Street 
Main Street 
Grove Avenue 
Cedar Street 
Main Street 



Andover Line 
B & M R. R. 
Belmont Avenue 
Byron Street 
Faulkner Avenue 
State Street 
Short Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Baker Street 
Garden Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Both Ways 
Burlington Line 
Winchell Road 
Fall Street 
Chestnut Street 



4600 



1.2 
2. 3 



2. 7 



0. 8 



0. 3 



1. 6 



800 
800 

700 

400 
1000 
1000 

450 
1000 
1550 

2370 
1 100 
907 

1377 

1378 
2500 



0. 6 



Date(s) Accepted 

3-02-08 
1 1-06-94 
1 1-06-94 

3-12-45 

3-10-47 

3-12-45 
1 1-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-01-15 
3-10-47 
3-14-59 
3-03-33 

3-17-52 3-10-53 
11-06-94 

3-13-33 3-08-43 

3-12-45 

6-21-38 
11-06-94 

3-13-54 I 
11-06-94 

3-12-45 3-10-5: 

1 

3-12-45 3-ll-4f i, 
1 1-06-94 



68 



Street 
Canal Street 
Carson Avenue 
Carter Lane 
Cedar Street 
Central Street 
Chandler Road 
Chapman Avenue 
Chase Road 
Chestnut Street 
Church Street 
Clark Street 
Cochrane Road 
Columbia Street 
Concord Street 
Congress Street 
Cook Avenue 
Coolidge Road 
Corey Avenue 
Cottage Street 
Cross Street 
Cianningham Street 
Cypress Street 

Davis Street 
Dayton Road 
Dell Drive 
Dobson Street 



From 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
Harris Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Kelly Road 
Hathaway Road 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Forest Street 
Church Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Grand Street 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Glen Road 

Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Glen Road 



To 

Burt Road 
Both Ways 

Burt Road 
Church Street 
Adams Street 



Woburn Line 
Middlesex Ave. 
Church Street 
Warren Road 
Talbot Avenue 
N. Reading Line 
Burlington Line 
Kensington Ave. 

Canal Street 

Lowell Street 
Beeching Avenue 



Gary Street 



Miles Feet 



2. 1 
0. 8 
0. 8 

0. 1 

1. 1 



1511 
677 

1400 
600 
574 
400 
322 
297 



800 



965 
1000 
270 
370 
920 
900 
2320 
260 

500 
170 
450 
1402 



Date(s) Accepted 
10-16-39 3-12-55 
3-10-53 3-12-55 
3-09-57 
3-12-45 

10- 16-50 
3-09-57 
3-05-51 
3-10-53 

1 1- 06-94 
1 1-06-94 
1 1-06-94 

3-10-47 

3-02-08 3-13-33 
1 1-06-94 

10- 16-39 
3-11-46 
3-05-51 
3-05-51 
3-13-54 

1 1- 06-94 

3/44 3/52 3/53 
3-05-51 

3-17-52 
3-05-51 
3-08-58 
3-13-54 



69 



Street 

Dorchester Street 
Draper Drive 
Dublin Avenue 
Dunton Road 

Eames Street 
Edwards Road 
Emerson Street 

Fairfield Avenue 
Fairmeadow Road 
Fairview Avenue 
Faneuil Drive 
Faulkner Avenue 
Fay Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 

Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gowing Road 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Gunderson Road 

Harnden Street 
Harris Street 



From 

Billerica Line 
Gunderson Road 
Main Street 
Nassau Avenue 

Main Street 
Forest Street 
Oakwood Road 

Main Street 
Nichols Street 
State Street 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Glen Road 
Glen Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Aldrich Road 

Main Street 
Glen Road 
Suncrest Avenue 
Park Street 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
Federal Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 

Main Street 
Burlington Avenue 



To 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



Both Ways 

Woburn Street 
Baldwin Road 
Faulkner Avenue 

Nichols Street 



W. Jamaica Ave. 
Gary Street 
Woburn Street 
Burlington Ave. 

Middlesex Ave. 
Glen Road 

Marcus Road 
Dunmore Road 
B & M R. R. 
Lake Street 
Both Ways 

Glen Road 
Cedar Street 
70 



0. 7 



1. 1 

0. 8 

1. 3 



0. 4 



0. 1 



1400 
100 
500 
638 



450 
600 

1300 
2328 

650 
1000 
2671 

700 



1300 
360 
900 
850 
780 

1081 
700 



3-05-51 
3-14-59 
3-05-51 
3-10-56 

1 1-06-94 
3-10-47 
3-05-51 

3-11-46 
3-08-58 
3-13-33 

10- 16-50 
3-13-44 3-10-53 
6-21-38 3-12-45 

1 1- 06-94 
1 1-06-94 

1 1:-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-14-59 
3-10-56 
3-17-52 
3-08-43 
9-29-10 
3-14-59 

3-04-95 
3-12-45 



Street 

Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 
Hubbard Street 

Jaquith Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 

Kelly Road 
Kendall Street 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
Kirk Street 

Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Liberty Street 



From 
Main Street 
Woburn Street 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Ave. 
Chestnut Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Aldrich Road 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Glen Road 
Birchwood Road 

Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
West Street 
Glen Road 
Main Street 

Main Street 
Bancroft Street 
Malloy Road 
Lawrence Street 
Glendale Circle 
Suncrest Avenue 
Federal Street 



To 

River Street 
Gunderson Road 

Woburn Street 
Burlington Line 

Lubbers Brook 
Billerica Line 
Lubbers Brook 



Miles Feet 



Cedar Crest Road 

Blanchard Road 

Reading Line 
Broad Street 

Shawsheen Ave. 
B & M R. R. 
Parker Street 

Shady Lane Drive 

B & M R. R. 



0. 5 
0. 5 



0. 5 



0. 5 



1. 



430 
1858 
230 



364 
950 

250 

1250 

719 
520 

923 
1300 
693 

2400 

572 

400 
657 
683 
3773 
383 
740 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-05-51 

3/51 3/53 3/59 

3-10-56 
1 1-06-94 

3-02-14 

3-14-59 
3/45 3/51 3/52 
1 1-06-94 

3-05-51 

3-08-48 3/49 3/51 

6-10-40 

3-10-53 

3-09-57 
3-12-45 
3-08-58 
11-06-94 
6-10-40 3-12-45 
3-05-51 

1 1-06-94 

3-17-52 
10-16-50 

3-10-56 

3-10-56 

3-14-59 

3-08-43 



71 



Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Lowell Street 

Mackey Road 
Main Street 
Marcus Road 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Ave. 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 
Miller Road 
Morse Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Nassau Avenue 
Nichols Street 
Nickerson Ave. 
Norfolk Street 
North Street 



From 
Federal Street 
High Street 
Main Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 

Federal Street 
Tewksbury Line 
Cowing Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Glen Road 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Avenue 

Shaw sheen Avenue 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
West Street 
Carter Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 



To 



B & M R. R. 



Miles Feet 



Reading Line 

Woburn Line 
Cowing Road 



St. Paul Street 



Salem Street 
Hob son Avenue 
Emerson Street 



Decatur Street 
Shawsheen River 

Nassau Avenue 
Dadant Drive 



1.9 



4. 



2. 3 



0. 7 



720 
1780 
1050 
990 
650 

250 

2315 
900 

1550 
800 

1424 
363 

400 

640 
1361 
598 

2000 

900 
538 
3533 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-08-43 

10- 16-50 
3-05-51 
3-09-57 
3-14-59 

1 1- 06-94 

3-08-43 
1 1-06-94 

3-08-58 

3-12-45 

3-05-51 

3-12-45 

3-13-44 

3-09-57 
1 1-06-94 

3-12-45 

3-12-45 

10- 16-39 
3-02-08 

3-11-46 

1 1- 06-94 
3-10-47 
3-13-54 

3-12-45 3-13-54 



72 



Street 
Oak Street 
Oakdale Road 
Oakridge Circle 
Oakwood Road 
Olson Street 

Park Street 
Parker Street 
Patricia Circle 
Pershing Street 
Phillips Avenue 
Pilling Road 
Pine Avenue 
Pineview Road 
Pinewood Road 
Powder House Circle 

Railroad Avenue 
Ridge Road 
Rollins Road 
Roosevelt Road 
Royal Street 

Salem Street 
School Street 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shaw sheen Avenue 



From 
Salem Street 
Judith Road 
Cowing Road 
Main Street 
Church Street 

Woburn Street 
Lowell Street 
Dell Drive 
Federal Street 
Wiser Street 
Hathaway Road 
Main Street 
Lipp Street 
Birchwood Road 
Middlesex Avenue 

Clark Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Fenway Street 
Boutwell Street 
Salem Street 

Tewksbury Line 
Middlesex Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 



To 

Short Street 
Cowing Road 
Fairfield Avenue 

N. Reading Line 
Blackstone Street 
Dell Drive 
B & M R. R. 
Wild Avenue 
Both ways 
Hobson Avenue 
Adelman Road 
Shady Lane Drive 

Stone Street 

Marion Street 
Burlington Avenue 

N. Reading Line 
High School Lot 

Lawrence Street 
Billerica Line 



Miles Feet 



0. 9 
0. 36 



0. 2 



2. 7 



350 
2280 
1730 
850 
132 



595 
720 

1800 
930 
400 
450 

1332 
730 

365 
200 
2000 
1040 

616 
380 
2676 



2. 2 



Date(s) Accepted 
3-19-51 

10- 16-50 
3-08-58 
3-11-46 
3-09-57 

1 1-06-94 
3-04-07 3-03-19 
3-08-58 
3-08-43 

3-11-46 3-13-54 

3-14-59 

3-12-45 

3-10-53 

3-13-54 

3-13-54 

3-01-09 
3-10-56 
3-13-54 
3-11-46 
3-05-51 

11- 06-94 3-05-06 
3-01-15 
3-12-55 
3-08-58 

11-06-94 



73 



Street 
She ridan Road 
Silver Lake Avenue 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 

Taft Road 
Taplin Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 

Upton Court 

Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Ave. 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 



From 
Hathaway Road 
Lake Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Belmont Avenue 
Lowell Street 
West Street 
Forest Street 

Burlington Ave. 
Hobson Avenu 
Church Street 
Church Street 
Hathaway Road 

Andover Street 

Main Street 

N. Reading Line 

Main Street 
Lake St. , Tewksbury 
Clark St. 
Woburn Street 
West Street 
Warren Road 
Grove Avenue 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Federal Street 



To 

Dexter Street 
Short Street 
Fairview Avenue 



Burlington Ave. 

Boutwell Street 
Lubbers Brook 



Lubbers Brook 



Chase Street 
Reading Line 
B & M R. R. 
Albert Street 
B & M R. R. 
Woburn Street 

B & M R. R. 



Miles Feet 
487 
455 
600 
275 
686 
1246 

0. 4 

3237 
900 
274 

0. 2 

300 

0. 1 

1076 
1200 

423 
100 

0. 3 

1. 7 

1211 
230 

0. 2 

1. 1 

693 
760 



Date( s) Accepted 
3-05-51 

3-13-54 

3-17-52 

3-03-33 

3-17-55 

3-13-54 

3-20-22 10-16-29 

6-21-38 
3-1 1-46 
6-06-11 
3-04-07 
3-10-53 

11-06-94 

3-06-16 
3-13-54 

3-08-58 
3-13-54 
3-01-20 

1 1- 06-94 
6-22-42 
3-13-54 

12- 29-10 
1 1-06-94 

6-10-40 
3-08-43 



74 



Street 

Winchell Road 
Wing Road 
Wiser Street 
Woburn Street 
Woodlawn Avenue 



From 
Grove Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Main Street 
Andover Street 
Border Avenue 



To 

Burnap Street 

Taplin Avenue 
Woburn Line 
Kensington Ave. 



Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



4. 2 



200 
746 
900 

250 



3-12-45 
3-08-58 

10- 16-50 

1 1- 06-94 
3-17-52 



sarah d. j. carter lecture fund 



The Carter Lecture Committee did not present any programs in 1959. Plans are made, however, 
to present the Women's Symphonette on Saturday evening, April 2nd, at 8. 15 p.m. in the Barrows Audi- 
torium. 

The Women's Symphonette is a group of accomplished musicians, all of whom have been soloists 
with various symphony orchestras throughout the country. It will be a Pops-type program with classical, 
semi -clas sical and popular selections. 

These programs are free of charge to the townspeople, and the committee hopes that as many as 
possible will come to hear this fine program. Children may attend if accompanied by adults. 



75 



housing authority 



Wilmington Housing Authority: Left to 
Right - Mrs. B. LaDow, Ernest B. Rice, 
Alan E. Fenton, Frank H. McLean, 
William F. Smith, James W. Franklin, 
and James P. Donahue. 




The Wilmington Housing Authority is carrying forth the administration on the following three (3) 
projects: 

Urban Renewal Mass. R-12 Federal 

Housing for the Elderly 667-1 State 

Veterans Housing 200-1 State 

This year has seen the continuation of the Veterans Housing Project, the completion of the Housing 
for the Elderly Project and further work on the Urban Renewal Project. 



URBAN RENEWAL 



The past year has been one of accomplishment for Urban Renewal activities on the "Wilmington 
Center" Project Mass. R-12 being carried forth by the Wilmington Housing Authority for the Town of 
Wilmington. 



To most persons, "Urban Renewal" is not completely understood in idea or what it can mean to them 
in the long run in saving tax dollars. Therefore, for those who are acquainted with the program there is no 
need to outline the concept, but for those whose busy schedules have not permitted time to investigate Urban 
Renewal the following brief summary is offered for their review. 

In summary, the Federal Urban Renewal Program was designed to assist financially communities 
being faced with serious municipal problems related to sound growth, and who desired to do something with- 
in their means about such problem areas that were in essence "strangling" community growth and increasin; 
the tax load. 



There are many different types of federal assistance available under this program, in the case of 
Wilmington there was applied for and received Federal Assistance for a program in which the Federal 
Government pays to Wilmington, Two Dollars as an outright grant for every One Dollar Wilmington Tax- 
payers spend on Urban Renewal. In 1957, based on the estimates in the Survey and Planning Application 
the Housing and Home Finance Agency reserved in Wilmington's name a reservation of $400, 000 for a gran 
to the "Wilmington Center" Urban Renewal Program. 



76 



Toward the goal of completing the details on the "Wilmington Center" program to obtain this grant 
the following was accomplished in 1959: (A) Submission of and approval for the "Project Eligibility and 
Relocation Report", needed to qualify the area for such a program (B) Engagement of Victor Gruen 
Associates, New York City, New York, as the Final Project Planning Consultants (C) Engagement of 
W. H. Ballard Co. , Boston, Mass. , as the "Re-Use Appraiser" for determining the highest and best use 
of the land. A Retail Market Potential Study is included in this contract- (D) Completion of a Special Topo- 
graphic Survey for information not available to the Consultants and (E) Engagement of and completion by 
Haley and Aldrich, Consulting Soil Engineers, Cambridge, Mass. , of an Engineering Study on Drainage and 
Soils m the Project area. In addition to the above outlined activities, there were negotiations with several 
interested persons and meetings with local merchants for purchase of and/or development of the Project 
area land. 

At the end of the year, the Final Project Report was complete excepting the estimates and details 
related to the Special Soil Engineering Study. This means that the Final Plans are complete for the Project 
and during the coming year the public hearings will be held in Wilmington, and the Town Meeting at which 
the Urban Renewal Plan is voted upon for approval by the Town will be held, after which acquisitions of 
land will commence immediately to carry out the program as voted by the Townspeople. 



HOUSING FOR THE ELD E R L Y 



This project located on Deming Way is for Massachusetts residents sixty-five years of age or over 
of low income . 

The contract to build this project was approved and awarded June 10, 1958 to the Roberto Construc- 
tion Company of Wakefield, Mass. , and actual work commenced two weeks later. On February 1, 1959, 
the first eight apartments were occupied; May 15, 1959, thirty-five apartments were ready and occupied; 
and since July, 1959, all forty units have been continually occupied. 

On June 27, 1959, the Wilmington Housing Authority held the Dedication of the Wilmington Housing 
for the Elderly Project. Invitations were extended to federal, state and local public officials; tenants and 
their guests and the general public. Open House was held throughout the project so that all might inspect 
the general layout and livable conditions along with the safety measures provided for the tenants conven- 
ience. 

In September, 1959, the Community Building was completed and the hall with kitchen facilities was 
made available for the use of the tenants of the project. The Deming Way Social Club was formed by the 
tenants of the project, and much pleasure has been derived by this group and other individual groups of 
tenants from the use of the hall. 

The Community Building also contains an office for the Housing Authority, a laundry room equipped 
with washer and dryer for the tenant's use, and the kitchen complete with range and refrigerator. The hall 
has been partly furnished for the tenant's use and through donations received and funds raised by the tenants, 
silverware, dishes, etc. have been added. 

The Project has received many commendations locally and from interested persons from other towns 
and cities who have inspected it with the view of building a similar project. 



77 



VETERANS 



HOUSING 



This project consists of thirteen single dwelling units occupied by veterans of low income in need of 
good housing. It allows them the opportunity of living in a clean, sanitary home at a rent within their means 

This project is now in the tenth year of operation and has been continually occupied except for a few 
days between change of tenants. This past year has seen only two changes in the tenants of the project; both'' 



were due to the large increase of 


income over the 


specified amount allowed by the By-law for continued 




occupancy. 












Balance Sheet 


as of June 30, 1959 






200-1 










Assets 




Liabilitie s 






Administration Fund 


5, 878. 46 


Accrued Compensation to Members 


39 


05 


Petty Cash 


20. 00 


Accrued Fire Insurance 


297 


49 


Reading Cooperative Bank 


2, 000. 00 


Accrued Pilot 


234 


00 


Accounts Receivable 


540. 12 


Matured Interest &c Principal 


1 c 

256 


'7 


Development Cost $198,000.00 




Security Deposit 


525 


f\(\ 

uu 


Liquidated 24, 000. 00 


174, 000. 00 


Bonds Authorized $198,000.00 












174 000 


00 






Debt Service Reserve 


4, 074 


00 






Operating Reserve 


911 


50 






Operating Surplus (Plus) 


2, 100 


75 




182, 438. 58 




182, 438 


58 




Balance Sheet 


as of Dec. 31, 1959 




1 


667-1 Administration 








1 
i 


Assets 




Liabilitie s 






Administration Fund 


13, 461. 49 


Prepaid Rent 


288. 


00 


Petty Cash 


20. 00 


Accrued Insurance 


720. 


00 






Operating Reserve 


1, 080. 


00 






Operating Surplus 


11, 393. 


49 




13, 481. 49 




13, 481. 


49 




Balance Sheet 


as of Dec. 31, 1959 






667-1 Development 










Assets 




Liabilitie s 






Development 


18, 187. 1 1 


Contract Retentions 


24, 687. 


41 


Development Cost 


557, 412. 54 


Notes Authorized 


575, 000. 


00 


Incomplete Contracts 


7, 294. 36 


Accrued Interest 


911. 


17 


Notes Unissued 


25, 000. 00 


Contract Awards 


7, 294. 


36 






Accounts Payable - Roberto 


1. 


07 




607, 894. 01 




607, 894. 


01 



78 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 7, 1959 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Harry J. Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington: 



GREETINGS:- In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Cafeteria, Saturday, the seventh of March, A. D. 1959 
at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 A. M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P. M. , for 
the election of Town Offices: 



Article 1: To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named Offices, to wit: Two 
Selectmen for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
one Moderator for the term of one year; one member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of 
three years (to fill an unexpired term) and vote on the following questions: 

Question #1. "Shall the acceptance by the Town of Wilmington of the act passed by the General Court in the 
year nineteen hundred and fifty, entitled 'An Act establishing a town manager form of government for the Town 
of Wilmington' be revoked?" 

Question #2. "Shall the Town of Wilmington accept the provisions of Chapter 32B of the General Laws, autho- 
rizing any county, city, town or district to provide a plan of group accidental death and dismemberment insur- 
ance, and group general or blanket hospital, surgical and medical insurance for certain persons in the service 
of county, city, town or district and their dependents. 

Question #3. "Shall the fluoridation of the water supply of the Town of Wilmington be continued?" 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of Wil- 
mington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in 
Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington on Saturday, the 
|14th day of March, A. D. 1959 at 1. 30 P. M. then and there to act on the remainder of the articles in said 
jw arrant. 
I 

In accordance with the above, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 9. 45 A. M. The Warrant 
as above was read by the Moderator and on a motion by Mr. Joseph Ring it was voted to dispense with further 
jreading of said warrant. 

The ballot box was examined by the Moderator, Town Clerk and Police. It was found to be empty and to 
register 0000. The checkers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties and the ballots distributed. 

The polls were declared open at 10. 00 A. M. The polls were declared closed at 8. 00 P. M. Following is 
;he vote as declared by the Moderator: - 



Selectmen - 3 years 

Elected Wavie M. Drew, Two Thousand Eleven 2011 

Elected Francis J. Hagerty, Two Thousand Three Hundred Twenty-five 2325 

Helen E. Chrusciel, Five Hundred Two 502 

Rene J. LaRivee, Eight Hundred Thirty 830 

Leo A. McCormack, Three Hundred Forty-six 346 

Blanks, Four Hundred Twenty-seven 427 

All others. Five 5 

6446 



79 



School Committee - 3 years 

Elected Arthur V. Lynch, Two Thousand Ninety-four 2094 
Elected Edward Page, Two Thousand One Hundred Twenty 2120 
Frederick P. Melzar, One Thousand Five Hundred Thirty-six 1536 
Blanks, Six Hundred Eighty-four 684 
All others. Twelve 12 

6446 

Moderator - 1 year 

Elected Simon Cutter, Two Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty-two 2762 
Blanks, Four Hundred Fifty-two 452 

All others. Nine 9 

3223 

Wilmington Housing Authority - 3 years (unexpired term) 

Elected James P. Donahue, Two Thousand One Hundred Ten 2110 
Harold F. Chase, Five Hundred Thirty-nine 539 
Blanks, Five Hundred Seventy 570 

All others, four 4 

3223 



Question #1: "Shall the acceptance by the Town of Wilmington of the act passed by the General Court in the 
year nineteen hundred and fifty, entitled 'An Act establishing a Town Manager form of government for the Town 
of Wilmington' be revoked?" 

Yes, One Thousand Fifty-eight 1058 
Voted No, Two Thousand One Hundred Fourteen 2114 

Blanks, Fifty -one 51 

3223 



Question #2: "Shall the Town of Wilmington accept the provisions of Chapter thirty-two B of the General Laws, 
authorizing any county, city, town or district to provide a plan of group life insurance, group accidental death 
and dismemberment insurance, and group general or blanket hospital, surgical and medical insurance for cer- 
tain persons in the service of such county, city, town or district and their dependents, a fair, concise summ- 
ary and purpose of which appears below?" 



This chapter authorizes the provision, by any town which accepts the same by vote of a majority of the voters 
voting on the question, of group life insurance, group accidental death and dismemberment insurance, and 
group general or blanket hospital, surgical and medical insurance, for certain persons in the service of the 
town, and their dependents. The employees to be covered include those employed, appointed, or elected by 
popular vote provided a substantial part of the person's total time is devoted to the service of the town during 
the regular work week. i 

i 

If the chapter is accepted, it will become mandatory upon the selectmen to arrange for insurance, half the 
premiums therefor to be paid for by the town and the other half by withholding from the salary or wages of the 
employees. The amount of life insurance and accidental death and dismemberment insurance on each employee 
would be two thousand dollars. 



Yes, One Thousand One Hundred Eighty-four 1184 
Voted No, One Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-two 1872 
Blanks, One Hundred Sixty-seven 1 67 

3223 

Question #3: "Shall the fluoridation of the water supply of the Town of Wilmington be continued?" If a ma- 
jority of the votes in answer to said question is in the affirmative, the fluoridation of the water supply of said 
town shall be continued, otherwise it shall be discontinued. 



I 



80 



Voted Yes, One Thousand Seven Hundred Twenty-nine 
No, One Thousand Three Hundred Seventy-four 
Blanks, One Hundred Twenty 

The ballot box read, Three Thousand Two Hundred Twenty-five (3Z25). The actual vote was. Three Thousand 
Two Hundred Twenty-three (32Z3). Two ballots caught in the machine, making bell and counter register 
twice each. There were six (6) spoiled ballots. Six voters were given a new ballot. 

Mr. Simon Cutter, Moderator read the total vote at 11.00 P.M. All elected officials were present, and they 
were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties at once. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING - March 14, 1959 - High School Gymnasium 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter at 1. 55 P. M. Rev. Richard Harding 
led us in prayer. Mr. Cutter asked the assembly to stand for a moment in silent prayer for the memory of 
Deputy Chief Francis S. Hoban, who had served his Town well. The Town was deeply saddened by his un- 
timely death. In order to save time, the Moderator suggested that the Warrant need not be read article by 
article. There being no objection, this procedure was followed. 

Article 2. To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. A report of the High School Building Com- 
mittee was read by Mr. Corum. He stated that $64, 200. 00 would be turned back to the Town. A rising vote 
of thanks was called for by Mr. Hagerty. 

The Permanent Building Committee said the Town would have a report from them at a later date. No other 
reports were offered at this time. 

i Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning Jan. 1, 1959, 
and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 17, Chapter 44, of 

j the General Laws. Finance Committee - approved. On a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to adopt the 

I article as above. 

I Article 4. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries of 
j the several Town Offices, and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. On a motion by Mr. Curtin 
it was voted that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance Committee be raised and 
■appropriated for the purposes set forth in Article #4, each item to be taken up and voted on separately, sub- 
ject to amendment. Accordingly the following amounts were voted: - 

I GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

I Board of Selectmen, Two Thousand One Hundred Dollars 
i Elections, One Thousand Dollars 

[jRegistrars of Voters, Two Thousand Six Hundred Dollars 
■Finance Committee, Seven Hundred Dollars 
Town Manager, Eight Thousand Two Hundred Forty Dollars 

Town Manager, Secretary, Three Thousand Five Hundred Thirty-six Dollars 
• ;Town Manager, Expenses, Nine Hundred Twenty-four Dollars 
- Industrial Account, One Thousand Two Hundred Dollars 

Town Accountant, Five Thousand Six Hundred Sixteen Dollars 



Taxatio n 
$ 2, 100. 00 
1, 000. GO 
2, 600. GO 

700. GO 
8, 240. GO 
3, 536. GO 

924. 00 
1 , 200. 00 
5, 616. 00 



81 



^TTMTTR AT (^.PlVPR TvTA/f T^TMT ^ nnti nii p rl ^ 
Ofl-j IN il* x\ AJ— ' OvJ V xLi £v i N iVi JLi i N 1 ^conLiriucci/ 


Taxation 


i own J\C C oiiriLcinL , x-jxperiscb, v^nc: i iicjia & diiu i-jigiiuy - ivjLir j-yuiiciio 




C\(\ 

UU 


Town Treasurer, Four Thousand One Hundred Seventy Dollars 


4, 170 


00 


Town Treasurer, Expenses, One Thousand Two Hundred Eighty Dollars 


1, 280 


00 


Town Collector, Four Thousand Five Hundred Forty-five Dollars 


A C A C, 


UU 


Town Collector, Expenses, One Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-five Dollars 


1 A c: 


UU 


Town Clerk, Three Thousand Six Hundred Ninety-two Dollars 


AO? 


UU 


Town Clerk, Expenses, Six Hundred Fifty-eight Dollars 




nn 
UU 


Board of Assessors, Ten Thousand Six Hundred Eight Dollars 


1 U , DUo 


nn 

UU 


Board of Assessors, Expenses, One Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-two Dollars 


I , Dye. 


nn 

UU 


Town Counsel, Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 




nn 
u u 


Town Hall, Salaries, Eight Thousand Six Hundred Two Dollars 


9. An? 


nn 

UU 


Town Hall, Expenses, Seven Thousand Three Hundred Ninety-eight Dollars 




nn 

UU 


Planning Board, Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars 


Q c; n 


nn 

UU 


TOTAL-i! General Government 




nn 

UU 








'Police Dept. Salaries, Seventy Thousand Seven Hundred Ten Dollars 


•7 n 7 1 n 


n n 

UU 


Police Dept. Expenses, Six Thousand Eight Hundred Ninety Dollars 


A Q Q n 


nn 
UU 


Article ^24 taken out of order at this time - See Article ^24 for results 






Fire Department Salaries, Sixty-four Thousand Six Hundred Twenty-four Dollars 


Ca L'y a 


nn 
UU 


Fire Department, Expenses, Four Thousand Eight Hundred Twenty-six Dollars 


A Q A 
4 , Oil D 


nn 
UU 


Fire Department, Outlays, Two Thousand Dollars 


c\c\r\ 


n n 
UU 


Fire/Police Station, Five Thousand Dollars 


c n n n 
D , UUU 


nn 
UU 


Ambulance Account, One Thousand Five Hundred Fifty Dollars 


1 c c n 

L , DDK) 


n A 
UU 


Civil Defense, Two Thousand Dollars 


^ , UUU 


nn 
UU 


Constable, One Hundred Dollars 


1 nn 
1 uu 


nn 

UU 


Dog Officer, One Thousand Nine Hundred Dollars 


1, 900 


00 


Building Inspector, Five Thousand Five Hundred Ninety Dollars 


5, 590 


00 


Building Inspector, Wages & Fees, One Thousand Seven Hundred Dollars 


1 -7 A r\ 
1 , ( UU 


A A 

00 


Building Inspector, Expenses, Seven Hundred Ten Dollars 


-7 1 n 
( 1 U 


AA 
UU 


Board of Appeals, Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 


^ DU 


n A 
UU 


Sealer of Weights & Measures, Seven Hundred Dollars 


1 UU. 


A A 

UU 


Tree Warden, Five Thousand Three Hundred Fifty-six Dollars 


b , J DO. 


n A 
UU 


Tree Warden, Expenses, Two Thousand Six Hundred Forty-four Dollars 


L A A 


A A 
UU 


Gypsy Moth Control, Five Thousand Three Hundred Dollars 


5, JOU. 


A A 


JJuth iivim Control, Seven thousand Seven Hundred JJoliars 


7 , 700. 


A A 
UU 


TOTAL: Protection, Persons and Property 


d* 1 Q A CCA 

$ 189, 650. 


A A 

00 


-■•Mr. Lynch moved to amend the Ponce Department Salaries from $70,710. 00 to $81, d40. 00 






Motion to amend was lost by a voice vote and was so declared by the Moderator. 






PUBLIC WORKS: 






Town Engineer, Six Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-six Dollars 


6, 656. 


00 


Engineering Assts. , Four Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 


4, 500. 


00 


Town Engineer Expenses-, One Thousand Two Hundred Ninety-four Dollars 


1, 294. 


00 


Highway Department Salaries, Forty-one Thousand Dollars 


41, 000. 


00 


Highway Department Expenses, Twenty-four Thousand Seven Hundred Dollars 


24, 700. 


00 


Road Machinery Account, Twelve Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 


12, 500. 


00 


Chapter 90 Construction, Six Thousand Dollars 


6, 000. 


00 


Chapter 90 Maintenance, One Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 


1 , 500. 


00 


Chapter 81 Maintenance, Eleven Thousand Dollars 


1 1 , 000. 


00 


Snow & Ice Control, Twenty Thousand Dollars 


20, 000. 


00 


Public Street Lights, Sixteen Thousand Dollars 


1 6, 000. 


00 


Parks, Three Thousand Six Hundred Dollars 


3. 600. 


00 


Cemeteries, Sixteen Thousand Eight Hundred Forty-four Dollars 


16, 844. 


00 


TOTAL: Public Works 


$165, 594. 00 



82 



HEALTH & SANITATION: Taxation 



Sanitarian, Six Thousand Eighty-four Dollars 6, 084. 00 

Public Health Nurse, Three Thousand Nine Hundred Dollars • 3,900. 00 

Bd. Health, Expenses, Five Thousand One Hundred Sixteen Dollars 5, 116. 00 

Garbage Collection, Nine Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Dollars 9, 450. 00 

Public Dump, Eight Thousand Dollars 8, 000. 00 

TOTAL: Health & Sanitation $32, 550. 00 

CHARITIES &c VETERANS BENEFITS: 

Admin. Public Welfare, Seven Thousand One Hundred Dollars 7, 100. 00 

Assistance, Public Welfare, Eighty-nine Thousand Dollars 89,000.00 

Veterans Aid and Benefits, Sixteen Thousand Two Hundred Dollars 16, 200. 00 

TOTAL: Charities & Veterans Benefits $1 12, 300. 00 

SCHOOLS: 

Salaries, Nineteen Thousand Nine Hundred Forty Dollars (General Control) 19, 940. 00 

Non-salary Items, Two Thousand Three Hundred Dollars " " 2, 300. 00 
Expense of Instruction: 

Salaries, Five Hundred Ninety-seven Thousand Seven Hundred Eighty-four Dollars 

and twenty-five cents 597 , 784. 25 

Non-salary items. Thirty-seven Thousand Four Hundred Ninety Dollars 37, 490. 00 
Health 

Salaries, Nine Thousand Six Hundred Eighty Dollars 9, 680. 00 

Non-salary Items, One Thousand One Hundred fifty Dollars 1, 150. 00 

Utilities, Eleven Thousand Nine Hundred Dollars 11,900. 00 

Transportation, Forty-four Thousand Two Hundred Five Dollars 44, 205. 00 
Auxiliary Agencies: 

Salaries, Three Thousand Three Hundred Eighty Dollars 3, 380. 00 

Non-salary Items, Sixteen Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Dollars 16,450. 00 

Capital Outlay, Seven Thousand One Hundred Eighty Dollars 7, 180. 00 

Special Account Salary, Five Thousand Seventy-five Dollars 5, 075. 00 

Sub-total School Department 756, 534. 25 

Operation of School Plant, One Hundred Thirty-seven Thousand Dollars 137, 000. 00 

Vocational Training, Eight Thousand Dollars 8, 000. 00 

TOTAL: Schools $901, 534. 25 

Estimated Receipts ($176,920.38) 

LIBRARY &i RECREATION : 

Public Library, Ten Thousand Four Hundred Dollars 10, 400. 00 

Recreation Commission, Six Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 6, 500. 00 

TOTAL: Library & Recreation 16, 900. 00 

j UNCLASSIFIED &c RESERVE: 

Reserve Fund, Ten Thousand Dollars 10,000.00 

Insurance & Bonds, Twenty-one Thousand Nine Hundred Ten Dollars 21,910. 00 

Train. Conf. & Out-of-State Travel, Nine Hundred Dollars 900. 00 

Tax Title & Legal Assistance, One Thousand Dollars 1, 000. 00 

Town Clock, One Hundred Dollars 100. 00 

Town Report, Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars 2, 500. 00 

ITOTAL: Unclassified & Reserve 36, 410. 00 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST: 



IPrincipal, Two Hundred Fifty-nine Thousand Dollars 259, 000. 00 

[nterest & Fees, On a motion by a member of the Finance Committee it v/as voted to raise 

by taxation 90, 176. 50 



83 



MATURING DEBT h. INTEREST: (continued) Taxatior 
And $5, 000. 00 fronn accrued interest from the sale of Bonds 

TOTAL: Maturing Debt & Interest 349, 176. 5( 

TOTAL BUDGET: 1,883, 664.7' 

By Taxation $1,878,664.75 

By Transfer 5, 000. 00 

$1, 883, 664. 75 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrang 
and have charge of such observance or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee - Approved. 
Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article, the appropriation to be raised by taxa- 
tion; the amount $750. 00. Voted unanimously. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee - approved. Mrs. Wavie M. Drew moved the adoption of the above article, 
the appropriation to be $750. 00 raised by taxation. Voted unanimously. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable quarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, or 
do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee - approved. Mr. Donald C. Kidder moved the adoptio 
of the above article, the appropriation of $750. 00 to be raised by taxation. Voted unanimously. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, under the authority of 
Section 9, Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. , 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee - approved $750. 00. Mr. Francis J. Hagerty 
moved the adoption of the above article, the appropriation of $750. 00 to be raised by taxation. Voted 
unanimously. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in cooperation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Section 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws 
of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Wilmington 4-H Town Committee. 
Finance Committee - approved. Mr. Charles H. Black moved the adoption of the above article, the appro- 
priation of $100. 00 to be raised by taxation. Voted unanimously. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to install street lights in the following Streets: or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - approved. 

Auburn Ave. - 3 lights Glen Road - 3 lights Marcus Road - 5 lights 

Catherine Ave. - 2 lights Gowing Road - 2 lights Nichols Street - 2 lights 

Christine Drive - 1 light Gunderson Road - 2 lights Oakdale Road - 3 lights 

Concord St. - 1 light Hathaway Road - 3 lights Oakridge Circle - 4 lights 

Dell Drive - 2 lights Kendall Street - 1 light Patricia Circle - 1 light 

Deming Way - 5 lights Longview Road - 2 lights Pilling Road - 2 lights 

Dobson St. - 4 lights Lowell Street - 1 light Roosevelt Road - 2 lights 

Drury Lane - 2 lights Main Street - 6 lights Salem Street - 1 light 

Marie Drive - 3 lights 

On a motion by Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice it was voted to install the above lights. 



84 



Article 11. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds,, 
and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize the sale 
or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee - approved $2, 500. 00. On a motion by Mrs. W. Drew it 
was voted to raise by transfer from available funds the sum of $2, 500. 00 and appropriate for the above pur- 
pose . 

Article 12. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the sale or 
turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Town Manager. Finance Committee - approved $4, 500. 00. On a motion by Mr. Donald C. Kidder it 
was voted that the sum of $4, 500. 00 for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department be 
raised as follows: $3 , 000. 00 from taxation and $ 1 , 500. 00 by transfer from the Road Machinery Fund Account 
and authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department. 

Article 13. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purpose of completing an inventory of town owned property, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee - approved $900, 00. On a motion by 
Mr. Francis J. Hagerty it was voted to raise by taxation $900. 00 and appropriate the same for the above 
purpose . 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - approved $3, 850. 00. On a motion by 
Mr. Charles H. Black it was voted to raise by taxation the sum of $3, 884. 05 and appropriate the same for 
the above purpose. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrow- 
ing or otherwise the sum of Seventy-five Thousand ($75, 000. 00) Dollars and appropriate the same for the 
purpose of acquiring a site and constructing a Municipal Garage or Public Works Building, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee - approved 
ten year Bond Issue. 

On a motion by Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice it was voted to appropriate the sum of $75, 000. 00 for the purpose 
of constructing a Municipal Garage or Public Works Building on land owned by the Town off Andover Street 
and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and is hereby autho- 
rized to borrow the s\im of $70, 000. 00 and to issue Bonds or Notes of the Town therefor from time to time, 
payable in not more than ten years and to raise by taxation the sum of $5, 000. 00. After some discussion a 
motion by Mr. Cuoco to lay it on the table was lost. Yes - 37, No - 317. Question on the main motion - 
vote carried - Yes - 326, No - 43. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum not to 
exceed Two Thousand Five Hundred ($2, 500. 00) Dollars and appropriate the sum for installing a catch basin 
at or near the receiving tomb on Main Avenue in Wildwood Cemetery and that the part of such amount not 
used for catch basin be used for hot topping Main Avenue as far as the money will permit, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. 

On a motion by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew it was voted to transfer from the sale of Cemetery Lots Account and 
appropriate the svim of $2, 500. 00 for installing a catch basin at or near the receiving tomb on Main Avenue 
in Wildwood Cemetery and that the part of such amount not used for catch basin be used for hot topping Main 
Avenue as far as the money will permit. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appro- 
priate a sum of money not to exceed Fifteen Hundred Dollars ($1, 500. GO) for the purpose of extending the 
Town fire alarm signal telegraph line and purchasing and connecting fire alarm signal boxes and other 



85 



necessary appurtenances thereto, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 
Finance Committee - approved. On a motion by Mr. Donald C. Kidder it was voted to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sum of $ 1 , 500. 00 for the purpose of extending the town fire alarm signal telegraph line and 
purchasing and connecting fire alarm signal boxes and other necessary appurtenances thereto. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds the sum of 
Four Hundred Dollars ($400. GO) to pay for balance due for engineering services in preparing plans for the 
town sewerage system not covered by grant from the U. S. Government, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee - approved. On a motion by Mr. Francis J. Hagerty 
it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of Four Hundred Dollars ($400. 00) to pay balance 
due for engineering services in preparing plans for town sewerage system not covered by grant from the 
United States Government. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws by inserting therein a new chapter 
numbered, entitled and reading as follows, or do anything in relation thereto. "Chapter 5a. Rules and Regi 
lations Governing the Operation of Motor-driven Boats in The Town of Wilmington". 

Section 1. No person shall operate a motor -driven boat unless he shall have first registered the same with 
the Chief of Police and obtained a certificate of registration together with a registration number for the boat 
which shall be displayed on both sides of the bow in niimerals at least six inches high. Said numerals may 
be painted on removal boards. The Chief of Police may revoke the registration of any boat, the operator of 
which has been convicted of violating any of the rules or regulations contained in this chapter. 

Section 2. No motor-driven boat shall be operated unless the motor has an underwater exhaust or is 
equipped with a muffler which complies with the standards set up by the Department of Public Safety. 

Section 3. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilmingt 
at such a speed or in such a manner as to endanger the lives and safety of others or the property of others 
or in such a manner as to cause danger of collision with other watercraft or in such a manner as to create 
excessive wash or wake so as to interfere with the operation and safety of other watercraft, endanger bathe 
or damage property. 

Section 4. The operation of a motor -driven boat on any lake pond or river in the Town of Wilmington unde 
conditions and/or in places or areas as hereinafter indicated at speeds greater than as so indicated shall b 
considered to be in violation of these rules and regulations. 

(a) When approaching or leaving the shore or a pier or when passing within one hundred feet of a bather or 
a bathing area or another boat or when passing within one hundred feet of the shore except in a location 
where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, three miles per hou 

(b) When passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from a bather or bathing are 
or another boat or when passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from the shore 
except in a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwellings exist, 
seven miles per hour. 

(c) When passing within five hundred feet of but over two hundred feet distant from the shore except in a 
location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no dwelling exist, ten miles pe 
hour . 

(d) In any location during the hours from one- half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise, seven 
miles per hour. 

Section 5. During the period commencing one-half hour after sunset and ending one -half hour before sunri 
every motor -driven boat shall display a fully visible white light. 



86 



Section 6. No person shall operate a motor -driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilmington 
within fifty feet of a bather or bathing area at any time except for life saving purposes. 

Section 7. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilming- 
ton while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. 

Section 8. Row boats, canoes and sailing boats shall have the right of way at all times. 



Section 9. The above rules and regulations are to be enforced by authorized police officials of the Town of 
Wilmington, and the violation of the above rules and regulations shall for each offense be punished by a fine 
of not more than Twenty Dollars ($20. 00). Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

The above amendments to the Town of Wilmington's By-laws were read by Selectman Nicholas L. DeFelice 
as a motion with the exception of Section 5 which was amended thus: Section 5. No motor -driven boat shall 
be operated during the period commencing one -half hour after sunset and ending one -half hour before sun- 
rise. There followed a lengthy discussion after which Mr. Fremont E. Coolidge offered an amendment as 
follows: I Move that all boats, or other water vehicles, other than row boats or canoes, - manually op- 
erated, shall be prohibited on Silver Lake. The above to be enforced by authorized Police Officials of the 
Town of Wilmington. The vote was as follows: Yes - 158, No - 133. The vote on the By-law motion as 
amended was as follows: Yes - 220, No - 56. Motion carried. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and/or the Board of Water Commission- 
ers and/or the Town Manager to execute and deliver on behalf of the Town a release running to Harry E. 
Wood of said Wilmington to all rights in a certain portion of his land lying on the notherly side of Hillside 
Way in said Wilmington which was taken by the Board of Water Commissioners by eminent domain through 
inadvertence in excess of the area actually intended to be taken: the area to be released being that portion of 
the area to be taken lying outside or beyond the boundaries set forth in the following description: 

Beginning at a point on the North side of Hillside Way 457. 57 feet from the Wilmington-Burlington Town line, 
thence Northerly 400 feet along the land now or formerly of William F. and Barbara E. Roberts, thence 
Easterly 200 feet more or less to the land now or formerly of Dante L. and De. C. Gattoni, thence South 
along said land 268 feet, to Hillside Way, thence by the line of Hillside Way 225 feet to the point of beginning, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee - approved. On a 
motion by Mr. Charles H. Black the above article was voted unanimously. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 268 of the Act and Resolves of 1952. An act 
providing that Police Officers of certain cities and town shall be given an additional day's pay when they 
are required to work on certain holidays, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of George S. Gushing 
and others. Finance Committee - disapproved. On a motion by Frederick M. Kleynen the above article was 
voted. By standing vote: Yes - 166, No - 120. 

Article 22 . To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 57A of Chapter 48 of the General Laws, which 
reads as follows: 

S 57A. Additional Day Off, or Pay, for Certain Fire Fighter s , etc. Required to work on certain Legal 
Holidays: Acceptance of Section Regulated - If any permanent member of the fire fighting force or fire 
alarm division of a fire department of a city or town is required to serve a tour of duty during the twenty- 
four hour period commencing at eight o'clock in the morning of January first, February twenty- second, 
April nineteenth, May thirtieth, July fourth, the first Monday of September, October twelfth, November 
eleventh. Thanksgiving Day or Christmas Day, or the day following when any of the five days first mention- 
ed , or October twelfth, November eleventh or Christmas occurs on Sunday, he shall be given an additional 
day off, or if such additional day off cannot be given because of personnel shortage or other cause, he shall 
be entitled to an additional day's pay provided, that any such member who through a rotation of shifts, works 
different days in successive weeks shall be granted, in each year in which the number of holidays falling on 
his regular days off is in excess of the number of holidays in such year falling on Saturday, additional days 

87 



I 



Article 22 (continued) . off equal to the excess, and, if any such additional day off, cannot be given because 
of personnel shortage or other cause, an additional day's pay shall be allowed in lieu thereof. This section 
shall take effect in a city having a Plan E charter when accepted by the affirmative vote of a majority of the 
city council, and in the case of other cities by vote of the city council, subject to the provisions of its charter 
and in a town by a majority vote at an annual town meeting, but not otherwise, (1953), 640, appvd. July 2, 
1953; effective 90 days thereafter). Request of George S. Gushing and others. Finance Gommittee - dis- 
approved. The above article was made into a motion by Mr. Frederick M. Kleynen and the town voted un- 
animous approval. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 47E of Chapter 31 of the General Laws in regards 
to annual compensation of each permanent employee of the Welfare Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of Andrew P. Ring and others. (Finance Gommittee - Disapproved. ) On a motion by 
Mr. Andrew P. Ring the above article was made into a motion. On a voice vote the motion was lost and so 
declared by the moderator. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 108D of Ghapter 41 of General Laws in regard to 
minimum annual compensation of each permanent fire fighter in the Fire Department, or do anything in re- 
lation thereto. Request of Frederick M. Kleynen and others. Finance Gommittee - disapproved. During 
action on Article #4 (Budget) Mr. Kleynen moved that article #24 be taken up out of order. Voted to do so. 
Yes - 202, No - 73. Mr. Kleynen moved the adoption of Article #24, and it was lost by a voice vote and so 
declared by the moderator. 

Article 25, To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain for 
the purpose of a police station site, that parcel of land situated on Ghurch Street substantially in the location 
of the private way known as Olson Road and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said pur- 
pose and determine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds in the treasury or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 
Finance Board approved - $50. 00. On a motion by Mr. Francis J. Hagerty it was voted to raise by taxa- 
tion $50. 00 and appropriate same to effect the purpose of the above article. 

On a motion by Mr. Hagerty it was voted to take up Article #27 before Article #26. Motion was voted un- 
animously. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $75, 000. 00 or any lesser amount for the purpose of 
constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a new police station upon land already owned by the Town, 
and to determine how said appropriation is to be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer or by borrowing, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Selectmen. Finance Gommittee - approved. 

On a motion by Mr. Hagerty it was unanimously voted to appropriate the sum of $75, 000. 00 for the purpose 
of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a new police station upon land already owned by the 
Town on Adelaide Street and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen 
be and is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $70, 000. 00 and to issue Bonds of the Town therefor from 
time to time payable in not more than ten (10) years; that the sum of $4, 800. 00 being the unexpended balance 
of the appropriation made under Article 40 of the Warrant for the Annual Meeting held in March 1958 be trans 
ferred and that the amount of $200. 00 be raised by taxation. 

Article 26 , To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken under Article 40 of the Warrant for the 
annual meeting held in March, 1958, providing for the acquisition of a site, the erection and equipment of a 
police station thereon and the appropriation of $65, 000. 00 to cover the cost thereof, $5, 000, 00 of which 
amount was to be raised by taxation and the balance by borrowing, or do anything in relation thereto, Reque 
of the Board of Selectmen, Finance Gommittee - approved. On a motion by Mr, Kidder it was voted un- 
animously to rescind so much of the action taken under Article 40 of the Warrant for the Annual Meeting held 
in March 1958 as provided for the acquisition of a site, the erection and equipping of a police station and the 
authority to borrow, 

A motion to recess until 7. 00 o'clock, made by Mr. Woods was lost by a voice vote. 



88 



Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept Hathaway Road Extension, Pilling Road, Gunderson Road 
and Draper Drive as public town ways as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning 
Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
take by Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of the article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and 
determine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by ti-ansfer from available funds in 
the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee - approved $50. 00. 

On a motion by Mr. Black it was voted to accept Hathaway Road Extension, Pilling Road, Gunderson Road 
and Draper Drive as public town ways as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning 
Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and authorize the Board of Selectmen to take 
by Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of the article and that the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $50. 00 for this pur- 
pose. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct Longview Road, Ledgewcod Road, Glenview 
Road and Hilltop Road as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to 
a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the Right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easement as may be necessary to effect the purpose 
of the article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how such 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury or other- 
wise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Board - approved 
$20, 000. 00. 

On a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted to accept and construct Longview Road, Ledgewood Road, Glen- 
view Road and Hilltop Road as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board accord- 
ing to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose 
of the article and raise by transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $20, 000. 00 for such pur- 
pose. The moderator doubted the voice vote and called for a standing vote. Yes - 269, No - 3. Carried. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Beeching Avenue as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned, 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised,, 
whether by taxation, or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease- 
ments and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 
Finance Committee - approved $3,000.00. 

On a motion by Mr. DeFelice it was voted unanimously to accept as a public way the layout of Beeching Ave. 
as approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the 
assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans there- 
in mentioned, is hereby referred to for more particular description and that the sum of $3, 000. 00 be raised 
by taxation and appropriated for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages 
resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements. 

Article 31 . To see if the Town will vote to extend the present industrial area located on the southerly side 
of Burlington Avenue, Wilmington, Massachusetts, as follows: Westerly of Floradale Avenue, Two Hundred 
twenty-six and 72/100 (226. 72) feet Southerly by land now or formerly by Hamilton, Two Hundred fifty-two 
and 37/ 100 (252. 37) feet: Northeasterly by land owned by Roderick Wm. Hoag on a line parallel with the 
Railroad line, Two hundred seventy and 53/100 (270. 53) feet; and Northwesterly by said Burlington Avenue 
One Hundred sixty-five and 87/100 (165.87) feet. The above described area containing 49,263.70 feet. On 
request of William E. Rogers and others. Finance Committee - approved. The Planning Board presented 



89 



Article 31 (continued) a report on this zoning change and recommends the approval of same. On a motion 
by Mr. William E. Rogers the above zoning change was voted unanimously. 

Article 3Z. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single Resi- 
dence B to Neighborhood Business District the following described parcel of land; Lots 171 through 173 in- 
clusive and 179 and 180 all as shown on a plan of land known as Silver Lake Pines Addition a copy of which is 
on record at the Assessors Office and more particularly described as follows: Northeasterly by lot 170 One 
Hundred twenty-one 33/ 100 ( 121. 33) feet, Northwesterly by Maple Road Twenty-nine and 84/100 (29. 84) feet, 
Southwesterly by lots 174 through 178 one hundred twenty-eight and 57/ 100(128.57) feet, Northwe sterly by 
lot 178 one hundred (100) feet, Southwesterly by Main Street one hundred ten and 03/100 (1 10. 03) feet, South- 
easterly by Oakwood Road two hundred forty-four and 07/100 (244. 07) feet, or do anything in relation thereto 
Request of Frances M. Corneliussen and others. Finance Committee - disapproved. The Planning Board 
presented a report on this zoning change and recommends the town meeting vote No on the above article. 
Standing vote as follows: Yes - 7, No - 215 - Lost. 

Article 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single Resi- 
dence A District to Industrial District the following described parcel of land' A certain parcel of land off 
Lowell Street bounded Westerly by West Street, 440 feet. Northerly by land of various owners, 1207 feet, 
Easterly by land of the Boston and Maine Railroad and State Route 93, Southerly by land of Minot and Ruth 
Anderson and John C. Elia or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Michael J. Elia and others. 
Finance Committee - disapproved. Mr. Elia withdrew the article. A motion to pass the article was un- 
animous . 

Article 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single Resi 
dence A to Industrial Zone an area on the north side of Lowell Street, bounded as follows: Starting at a 
County Bound on the north side of Lowell Street, thence northerly to the property formerly of Carter (approxi 
mately 460 feet), thence easterly 327 feet along said property line to Interstate Highway No. 93; thence 
southerly along said Highway 517 feet to Lowell Street; thence westerly along the north side of Lowell Street 
by three courses of 182 feet, thirty feet and 115 feet to point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of James R. Anderson and others. Fin3.nce Committee - disapproved. The Planning Board pre- 
sented a report on this zoning change and recommends that this article be defeated. Standing vote as follows:; 
Yes - 5, No - 204. Motion lost. 

Article 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single Resi- 
dence A to General Business District the following Sections of land. The land in the southern section of 
Wilmington, bounded as follows: being all that land now owned by grantee and used as a Real Estate Office, 
said triangular lot of land, bounded as follows: Five hundred twelve feet (512) on New Main Street, Six 
Hundred Forty-nine feet (649) on Old South Main Street, consisting of One and Forty-four Acres (1. 44) as 
shown on Plan, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Mary Quigley and others. Finance Committed 
disapproved. The Planning Board presented a report on this zoning change and recommends that this article! 
be defeated. The above article was read as a motion and a standing vote was taken. Yes - 38, No - 152. Loj 

Article 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing zoning regulations as established by a Special 
Town Meeting dated November 28, 1955 are amended so that the premises located at 306 Main Street, Wil- 
mington, Massachusetts now zoned as suburban rural area be changed to that for general business use, and 
that said premises are more particularly described as follows: Being numbered 306 on the Easterly side 
thereof on Lot # 1 on plan dated November 3, 1926 recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds, Book of 
Plans 49, Plan 73 and bounded and described as follows: Beginning on the Southwest corner of Main Street 
as Lot 7 on said plan thence running Northwesterly on Main Street nineteen and 54/100 (19. 54) feet to a stone 
bound, thence still by Main Street Thirty-six and 96/100 feet (36. 96) to angle, thence Northerly and North- 
easterly on a curved line Fifteen (15) feet more or less to a stone bound, thence Easterly on Clark Street One 
Hundred Forty-five and 96/100 (145. 96) feet to Lot 2 on said plan, thence Southerly on Lot 2 Sixty-six and 
75/100 (66. 75) feet to Lot 7 on said Plan, thence Westerly by Lot 7 One Hundred Thirty-nine and 32/100 
(136. 32) feet to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Edward J. Curtis and 
others. Finance Committee - disapproved. A motion by Mr. Hagerty to pass the article was unanimous. 

90 



Article 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds the sum of 
Three Thousand Dollars ($3, 000. 00) and appropriate the same for the purpose of constructing a municipal 
Dog Pound or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - 
approved. On a motion by Mr. Kidder it was voted to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3, 000. 
for the purpose of constructing a Municipal Dog Pound on land now owned by the Town of Wilmington off 
Andover Street. Unanimous. 

Article 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 41, Section llOA of the General Laws, that any 
public office in a town may remain closed on any or all Saturdays, as may be determined by a vote of the 
Town, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - dis- 
approved. On a motion by Mr. Hagerty it was voted to pass the article. 

A motion was made to adjourn. Meeting adjourned at 6:20 P. M. There were Four Hundred Ninety-five 
(495) registered voters at the meeting. 



Total voted as follows: 



By Taxation 
By Transfer 
By Borrowing 
Grand Total: 



$1 , 902, 748. 80 
36, 300. 00 
140, 000. 00 
$2, 079, 048. 80 



A t rue copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - JUNE 22, 1959 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Harry J. Ainsworth, Constable of the Town of Wilmington. 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to 
vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium, Church Street, on Monday, 
I the Twenty- second Day of June next at 8. 00 p. m. to consider and act on the following Articles - 

Warrant for said meeting was posted in five conspicious public places in Town according to the Constable's 
return, as follows: 

Middlesex SS June 13, 1959 

I, this day posted attested copies of the above warrant in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wil- 
mington. 

(Signed) Harry J. Ainsworth 
Constable of Wilmington 

The meeting was called to order by Mr. Simon Cutter, Town Moderator, at 8. 14 P. M. A motion to adjourn 
the meeting to July 1, 1959 at 8. 00 P. M. was made by Donald Kidder, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
and seconded by Nicholas DeFelice, Selectman; Francis Hagerty, Selectman, asked to have motion amended 
to read, "meeting to be held at Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium", Mr. Kidder accepted amendment and 
motion was declared a vote by the Moderator. Meeting adjourned at 8. 16 P. M. 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



91 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - July 1, 1959 



The meeting was called to order by Mr. Simon Cutter, Town Moderator, at 8. 30 P. M. Mr. Cutter read 
the call to meeting. Mr. Nicholas DeFelice moved to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. This 
was so voted. 

A resolution was read by Mr. Donald Kidder, Chairman of the Selectmen, said resolution to be spread upon 
the records and was so voted by the meeting. 

TO; Dr. Dudley A. Buck (written by Rev. Richard E. Harding) 

BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE CITIZENS OF WILMINGTON ENTER IN THE OFFICIAL TOWN RECORD ACK 
NOWLEDGMENT OF THE DEVOTED SERVICES OF THE LATE DR. DUDLEY A. BUCK WHOSE SUDDEN 
DEATH ON MAY 21, 1959, BROUGHT GRIEF TO OUR COMMUNITY. 

Dr. Dudley A. Buck, age thirty-two, renowned research scientist and teacher at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, beloved leader of youth, devoted servant of the community of Wilmington as a member of the 
School Committee, serving as its chairman in 1958, and a man of vital faith in God and man, witnessed in 
His Service to His Church as lay speaker and church school teacher. 

The quality of character of Dudley A. Buck is remembered best as it is exemplified in his family, through 
his wife Jacqueline, his children Carolyn, Douglas and David, and in his love of persons in all stations of 
life without regard for color or creed. 

The spirit of the man is expressed by the poet William Blake when he wrote: 

To see a world in a grain of sand. 
And a heaven in a wild flower: 

Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, 
And eternity in an hour. " 

The meeting stood for a moment in silent prayer in respect to the memory of Dr. Dudley A. Buck. 

Mr. Donald Kidder, read to the meeting a Certificate of Merit which was presented to Herbert C. Barrows 
on June 15, 1959. 

TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
1959 

IN GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF A LONG AND DEDICATED CAREER OF PUBLIC 
SERVICE, WE, THE DULY ELECTED OFFICIALS OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON, ACTING 
ON BEHALF OF THE CITIZENS OF WILMINGTON, DO HEREBY AWARD A CERTIFICATE OF 
MERIT TO HERBERT C. BARROWS - 

Nowhere in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts exists such a record of conscientious devotion 
to municipal service. We, of the Town of Wilmington, have for 65 years, benefited by your 
wisdom, advice, guidance and experience. The vital and complex financial affairs of this grow- 
ing community have been directed by your incomparable chairmanship for thirty years. 

WITH JUSTIFIABLE PRIDE IN OUR BELOVED, RESPECTED AND HONORED "SENIOR 
CITIZEN" WE HEREWITH, WITH HUMBLE GRATITUDE, PRESENT THIS AWARD. 

WE AFFIX OUR HAND AND SEAL THIS 15TH DAY OF JUNE, 1959. 

Donald C. Kidder Nicholas DeFelice 

Wavie M. Drew 
Charles H. Black Francis J. Hagerty 

92 



Mr. H. Barrows has been a life -time member of the Finance Board, and recently he was appointed an 
Honorary Chairman for life. 

Mr. MacKelvey rose on a point of personal privilege to ask the meeting to rise in a moment of silent prayer 
for the late Thomas Daly, former member of the Finance Board. This was done. 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to sell to the Boston Edison Company all the Town's right, title and 
interest which it may have acquired by tax titles, by deeds under affidavits of low values, or otherwise, in 
and to a strip or parcel of land two hundred fifty (250) feet in width, located in said Town of Wilmington, 
bounded and described as follows: 

A strip or parcel of land two hundred fifty (250) feet in width and bounded northwesterly and southwesterly by 
land of said Boston Edison Company, formerly of Millard C. Pipes and Ruby H. Pipes and George B. 
Richardson. Said strip or parcel of land extends from said Boston Edison Company's land in an easterly 
and southeasterly direction, crossing Ancient Main Street (now abandoned). Old Main Street and Main Street, 
to the Wilmington and Woburn town line, as shown on a plan showing the bounded center line of Boston Edison 
Company's two hundred fifty (250) foot Right of Way, entitled, "Plan of Land in Wilmington", dated March 12, 
1959, to be recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds, determine the price to be paid therefor, and 
authorize the Selectmen to sign, seal, acknowledge and deliver, in the name and on behalf of the Town any 
and all deeds or other instruments which may be necessary in order to consummate such sale, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. On request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - approved. 
Mr. Nicholas DeFelice, Selectman moved the adoption of the above article for the purpose set forth for the 
price of $2500. 00, and authorize the Selectmen to sign, seal, acknowledge and deliver, in the name and on 
behalf of the Town any and all deeds or other instruments which may be necessary in order to consummate 
such sale. Motion was adopted unanimously. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VII-1 of its Zoning By-Laws by striking out the 
first sentence thereof and inserting in place therefor the following: "No soil, loam, sand or gravel shall be 
removed from any parcel of land not in public use even though such land was being used for such purposes 
at the time of the adoption of this provision." or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Board of 
Selectmen. Finance Committee - approved. Planning Board report, by Mr. Beers (Chap. 287, Acts 1959) 

Motion: made by Mr. Hagerty, Selectman, I move that the Town vote to amend VII-1 of its Zoning By-laws by 
striking out the first sentence thereof and inserting in place therefor the following: "No soil, loam, sand or 
j gravel shall be removed from any parcel of land not in public use even though such land was being used for 
such purposes at the time of the adoption of this provision." Motion was adopted unanimously. 

Article 3 . To see if the Town will vote to ratify the actions heretofor taken by its Selectmen, Town Counsel 
jand Town Manager in opposing before the Department of Public Utilities the petition of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad for the discontinuance of all passenger service at the North Wilmington station, the re-routing of 
passenger trains serving points on the western division north of North Wilmington over the New Hampshire 
division to Wilmington and thence over the so-called "wildcat" line to Wilmington Junction- the discontinuance 
of all passenger train service between Woburn and Wilmington, and other changes in service affecting the 
interests of the town and its inhabitants, and in appealing to the Supreme Judicial Court from the order of 
the Department permitting such changes, and to authorize the further prosecution of such appeal to final 
judgment, and the taking of any such further or other action as may in the judgment of said officials or any 
of them be necessary or advisable to protect the interests of the Town and its inhabitants, or do anything in 
relation thereto. On request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Finance Committee approved ratification of action to date and in the future, provided that any expenditure of 
money is voted in an article included in some future annual or special Town meeting. Motion by Mrs. Drew, 
iselectman. Mrs. Drew moved the adoption of the above article. Motion was adopted unanimously. 

Article 4 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and map by changing from Industrial to 
3eneral Business District the following described parcel of land: 



93 



Beginning at the intersection of Main Street and Bridge Lane, thence along Bridge Lane, North 35° 33' 58" 
East 98. 00 feet, thence North 74° 24' 04" , East 422. 1 5 feet, thence North 53° 55' 05" , East 28 1 . 3 6 feet to th 
Boston and Maine Railroad, thence South 27° 23' 57" , East 1 , 752 feet more or less along the Boston and Mai i 
Railroad to Shawsheen Avenue, thence Southwest 92 feet more or less to the center line of Main Street, then ; 
1,916 feet more or less along Main Street to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. On 
request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved Planning Board action. Mr. Beers gave a 
report of the Planning Board on this article. Mr. Slater, member of the Planning Board, moved the 
adoption of the above article. Motion was adopted unanimously. 



Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and map, by changing from Single 
Residence A to General Business District, the following sections of land in the Southern section of Wilming- 
ton bounded by New Main Street for Six Hundred Fifty-two feet (652) and by Old Main Street for Seven Hun- 
dred Seventy-four feet (774) approximately 1. 9 acres as shown on plan or do anything in relation thereto. 
On petition of Aubrey Lloyd Laffin and others. Finance Committee approved Planning Board action. 

Amendment by Mr. Laffin - to replace the words General Business District with the words Neighborhood 
Business. Mr. Cutter stated motion to amend was a vote. The Planning Board report on this article was 
read by Mr. Woolaver and stated that the Board was not in favor of the Zoning change. See report filed with 
Town Clerk. The question on the main motion as amended was lost. Yes - 37, No - 91. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-laws, Division 4, Section 2 by adding the 
word "habitable" immediately following the word "Minimum," or do anything in relation thereto. On reques 
of the Building Inspector. Finance Committee - approved. Motion made by Mr. Donald C. Kidder, I move 
that the Town vote to amend the Building By-laws, Division 4, Section 2, by adding the word "habitable" 
immediately following the word "Minimum." 

To clarify the meaning of the word "habitable" the Moderator read from the Town's Board of Health Regu- 
lations Chapter XI, Section 1-10 - Habitable Room shall mean a room or enclosed floor space used or in- 
tended to be used for living, sleeping, cooking, or eating purposes, excluding bathrooms, water closet com 
partments, laundries, pantries, foyers, or communicating corridors, closets and storage spaces. Modera 
tor declared the vote carried. Seven people stood to show the vote was doubted. A standing vote was taken 
Yes - 71, No - 59. Vote carried. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-laws by adding a Section 4 to Division 7, 
as follows: "In all buildings hereafter constructed, where a concrete floor slab is supported on soil, all so< 
roots, stumps, topsoil, and other organic material shall be removed from beneath the slab, replacing it 
with properly compacted sand and gravel. A vapor barrier consisting of waterproof paper or plastic, shall 
be placed directly beneath the slab. All such concrete slabs shall be constructed of 2500 psi concrete or 
better, at least 4 inches in thickness, reinforced with welded wire mesh placed at mid-depth of the slab. 
Should the outside finish grade exceed 3 feet below finish floor, the foundation wall, and the slab, if it is 
tied to the wall, shall be designed to resist the lateral earth pressure. Outside finish grade shall, in any 
case, be at least 12 inches below finish first floor level,, in such buildings," or do anything in relation there 
to. On request of the Building Inspector. 

Finance Committee approved. Mr. DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article. Amendment by 
Mr. Anderson after the words "or better" insert the words "and except for cellar floors of single family 
dwellings." Amendment declared a vote. Motion was adopted as amended unanimously. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-laws by adding a Section 10 to Division 11 
as follows: "Provide two 2x4 continuous plates, furnished in minimum lengths of 8 feet, on the top of all 
bearing partitions and exterior walls, of stud construction. The joints of all 2x4 members resting on top 
of the studs shall be staggered. Exterior sheating, in such walls, shall normally be applied with vertical 
joints staggered. In case the vertical joints are continuous, however, each joint shall be backed by double 
2x4 studs securely nailed or bolted in contact across the joint at 12 inches on center and shall be covered 
by staggered finish siding. " or do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Building Inspector. 



94 



Finance Committee - approved. Mr. Francis J. Hagerty moved the adoption of the above article. Motion 
was adopted unanimously. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 6 of Chapter 6 of the Town's By-laws by deleting 
said section and substituting the following in its place: "Section 6. No roof sign shall be constructed with- 
out the approval of the Building Inspector or in any district other than those designated for indistrial or 
general business use. All such signs shall be constructed entirely of metal or other non-combustible mater- 
ial including all braces and supports. In no event shall it project more than ten inches from the face of the 
wall, nor project above the roof line in the case of a building with a pitched roof, nor more than two inches 
for each lineal foot of building frontage in the case of a building with a flat roof. In the event of a flat roof 
each occupant shall be considered separately on the basis of frontage occupied by him. There shall not be 
more than one such sign for each firm or business occupying a building and the over -all size of such sign or 
signs shall not exceed in area more than fifteen per cent of the area of the face wall of the building or the 
size provided for by the Zoning By-law of the Town, whichever may be the lesser," or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. On request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee - approved. Mr. Fitzmaurice, mem- 
ber of the Planning Board moved the adoption of the above article. Motion was adopted unanimously. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase or take by eminent 
domain for the purpose of erecting a public school thereon certain parcels of land off Boutwell Street de- 
scribed as follows: Beginning at a drill hole in a stone wall on Boutwell Street one hundred and thirty- seven 
and seventy-four hundredths feet from the southeasterly corner of the land now or formerly of Arthur H. Jr. 
and Louise R. Clarke, thence North 37° 30' 50" East 396.42 feet to a drill hole, thence North 62° 36' 40" 
East 125. 04 feet to a drill hole, thence North 67 °31' 40" East 259. 70 feet to an iron pipe, thence North 
52° 10' 20" West 169. 67 feet to a drill hole, thence North 32° 10' 20" East 150. 40 feet to a drill hole, thence 
North 49° 03' 00" West 543. 31 feet to an iron pipe, thence South 39° 04' 10" West 569. 30 feet to an iron pipe, 
thence South 4^ 57' 30" East 355. 46 feet to an iron pipe thence South 44 °33' 15" West 209. 78 feet to a drill 
hole, thence 250. 84 feet along a stone wall to a point of beginning, consisting of three parcels and shown on 
a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts" dated May 23, 1959, all according to a plan on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk, and to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for acquiring said land off Boutwell Street and for constructing and originally equipping and furnishing there- 
on an elementary school, determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, and to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building 
Committee to enter into contracts and to do all things that are necessary for constructing, equipping and 
furnishing said elementary school, or take any action relative thereto. On request of the Permanent Build- 
ing Committee. Finance Committee approved $400, 000. 00 - 20 year bond issue. 

Motion by Mr. Hanke, member of the Permanent Building Committee, move the adoption of the above article 
"and for these purposes that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of four hundred thousand dollars 
($400, 000. 00) and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and 
is hereby authorized to borrow a sum or s\ims not to exceed four hundred thousand dollars under authority 
of Chapter 645, Acts of 1948 as amended, and to issue bonds or notes therefor payable in not more than 
twenty years, and that the Permanent Building Committee is authorized to enter into contracts and to do all 
things that are necessary for constructing, equipping and furnishing said elementary school." 

Motion to Amend by Edward F. Page, member of the School Committee. Motion: I move that the motion 
before the House be amended by substituting the amount of $425, 000. 00 in lieu of $400, 000. 00 and that the 
motion be clarified by the statement that said school be of the so-called spread-type wing design and contain 
a minimum of eight classrooms. Motion to amend was defeated unanimously. 

Motion on the main question was adopted unanimously. 

Article 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer any portion or the whole of the balance remaining of the 
loan issued by the Town under the provisions of Clause (4) of Section eight of Chapter forty-four of the 
General Laws, for the construction of a standpipe off Chestnut Street, and appropriate the same for the pur- 
pose of developing additional wellfields, including wells, pipes, and original pumping station equipment,, or 



95 



do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Board of Water Commissioners. Finance Committee 
approved - subject to pending legislation. 

MOTION by Waldo O. Stevens, member of the Board of Water Commissioners - I move that the Town vote 
to transfer the sum of $51, 603. 00 of the loan issued by the Town under the provisions of clause (4) of Sectio 
Eight of Chapter Forty-four of the General Laws, for the construction of a standpipe off Chestnut Street, an 
appropriate the same for the purpose of developing additional well fields, including wells, pipes and origin 
pumping station equipment, and improvements to existing facilities. The motion was adopted unanimously. 

A motion was made to adjourn. Meeting adjourned at 10. 45 P. M. There were One Hundred Eighty-two 
registered voters present. 



WARRANT FOR THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - August 17, 1959 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

Due to a lack of a quorum the Moderator was unable to call the meeting to order before 8. 59 P- M. 
Mr. Cutter read the call to meeting and Mr. Kidder moved to suspend further reading of the Warrant. This 
was voted unanimously. Mr. Donald Kidder, Chairman of Selectmen, with permission of the Moderator 
introduced Mr. Cecil O. Lancaster, the newly appointed Town Manager. Mr. Lancaster spoke briefly and 
was well received. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to reaffirm and ratify the action taken at the Annual Town Meetingjl 
in March, 1959, under Article 15 of the Warrant for said meeting, whereby it was voted "To appropriate 
the sum of $75, 000. 00 for the purpose of constructing a Municipal Garage or Public Works Building on land 
owned by the Town off Andover Street and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer with the approval of 
the Selectmen be and is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $70, 000. 00 and to issue Bonds or Notes of 
the Town therefor from time to time, payable in not more than ten (10) years and to raise by taxation the 
sum of $5, 000. 00" or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. Mr. Hagerty, Select- 
man, moved the adoption of the above article. The vote was unanimous, and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to reaffirm and ratify the action taken at the Annual Town Meetingj 
in March, 1959, under Article 27 of the Warrant for said meeting, whereby it was voted "to appropriate the | 
sum of $75, 000. 00 for the purpose of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a new police static^ 
upon land already owned by the Town on Adelaide Street and to meet said appropriation that the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen be and is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $70, 000. 00 and to issue i 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor from time to time payable in not more than ten years that the sum of 
$4,800. 00 being the unexpended balance of the appropriation made under Article #40 of the Warrant for the 
Annual Meeting held in March 1958 be transferred and that the amount of $200. 00 be raised by taxation", or 
do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. Mr. Charles Black, Selectman moved the 
adoption of the above article. The vote was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. | 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from a Neigh- : 
borhood Business District to a General Business District the area of land bounded as follows: Beginning at 
the southeast corner of Lowell and Woburn Streets, running east along Lowell Street for 200 feet and turning! 
90° south and running 150 feet, then west parallel to Lowell Street to Woburn Street, then north along Woburi 
Street 150 feet to point of beginning. And by changing from a Single Residence "A" District to a General 
B usiness District the area of land bounded asffollows: Beginning at a point in the northerly line of Lowell 
Street at the point of curve between Lowell and Woburn Streets and running northerly by the arc of curve a 
distance of 87 feet to a point in the easterly line of Woburn Street, thence running northerly by said easterly 
line of Woburn Street a distance of 1 1 feet to a point, thence turning and running easterly a distance of 255 
feet more or less to a point, thence turning and running southerly a distance of 170 feet, thence turning and 
running westerly by the northerlin line of Lowell Street a distance of 285 feet to the point of beginning, or 
do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved the action of the Planning Board. On a motioni 
by Mr. Donald Kidder it was voted unanimously to pass the article. Report of the Planning Bd. on file. 



Voted to adjourn at 9. 05 P. M. (total six minutes) Total voters present 157. 

96 



i 



WARRANT 



ANNUAL TOWN MEE T IN_ G_ 
TO: A. John Imbimbo, Constable of the Town of Wilmington; 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the 

HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 
Saturday, the 5th Day of March, A. D. I960 

at 9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 A. M. and shall be closed at 8. 00 P. M. , for 
the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1. Two Selectmen for the term of three years: Two Members of the School Committee for the 
term of three years; One Member of the School Committee for a term of one year (to fill an unexpired term); 
One Member of the School Committee for the term of two years (to fill an unexpired term); One Moderator 
for the term of one year; One Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church St;reet, in said Town of Wilmington 

on 

Saturday, the 12th Day of March, A. D. I960 
at 1. 30 P. M. , then and there to act on the following Articles: 
ARTICLE Z. To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, I960 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1961, and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and salaries 
of the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars 
($1000. 00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a Committee who shall ar- 
range and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as . 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
the reto. 

97 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven H\uidred Fifty Dollars ' 
($ 750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 
or do anything in relation thereto. ! 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the authority of ■ 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters for 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. I06, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. , or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100.0 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in co-operation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws 
of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
I thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 12. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the 
' sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Request of the Town Manager. 

J ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 

i money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for the pur- 

' chase of a truck for the School Maintenance Department, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of 

Francis E. Downs, Superintendent of Wildwood Cemetery. 

ARTICLE 14. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a track for the use of the Fire Department and authorize the sale 
or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Fire Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of lay- 
ing water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified streets in accord- 
ance with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of 
Chapter 332, of the Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request 
of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 16. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Welfare Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of the present vehicle used by the Welfare Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 17. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a sidewalk snowplow for the use of the Highway Department, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 18. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a sidewalk roller for the use of the Highway Department, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 



98 



ARTIC LE 19- To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of New Street Signs for the Planning Board, or do anything in re- 
lation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. 

ARTICLE ZO. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a new sprayer for the use of the Tree Department, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Tree Warden. 

ARTICLE 21. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate for the purpose of installing a drainage system on Hobson Avenue, or do anything m 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in re- 
lation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of installing a traffic control signal at the intersection of 
Burlington Avenue, Marion Street and Deming Way, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Wilmington Housing Authority. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Permanent Building Committee to prepare pre- 
liminary plans, specifications and cost estimates pertaining to a new intermediate school, and for said 
[ purpose to appropriate a sum of money to be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by bond 
issue, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building Committee. 

. ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
1 money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for hot 
1 topping Avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any action in relation there 
to. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. 

. ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to establish a council for the aging consisting of the Chairman 
of the Board of Public Welfare, the head of the Playground or Recreation Commission (if any, otherwise the 

' Chairman of the Board of Park Commissioners), the Chairman of the Board of Health, the Superintendent 
of Schools, or their respective representatives, and not less than three nor more than seven additional 

j members appointed by the Town Manager from the voters and residents of the Town. The Chairman of the 
Council shall be designated from time to time by the Town Manager. Appointees shall hold office until suc- 

[; cessors are designated. The Council may appoint such clerks and other employees as it may require. 

I 

I It shall be the duty of the council to co-ordinate or carry out programs designed to meet problems of the 
■ aging in co-ordination with programs of the Council for the Aging established under section seventy-three 

of chapter six of the Massachusetts General Laws, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board 

of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 authorizing the Town 
of Wilmington to construct and operate a system of sewers, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action taken by the Town under Article 

2 of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held October 29, 1956, whereby the Town voted to determine 
that there is a need for a redevelopment authority in the Town as authorized by G. L. (Ter. Ed. ) Chapter 
121, Section 26Q, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action taken by the Town under Article 

3 of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held October 29, 1956, whereby the Town voted to determine 



99 




that there exists in the Town the need for an Urban Renewal Program, or Programs, as authorized by G. L. 
{Ter. Ed. ) Chapter IZl, Section 26XX, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Select- 
men and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action taken by the Town under Article 

5 of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held October Z9, 1956, whereby the Town voted to appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of acquiring as a site for a school building a parcel of land containing app- 
roximately 12. 2 acres of land on the corner of Salem Street and Ballardvale Street, or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action taken by the Town under Article 

6 of the warrant for the Special Town Meeting held October 29, 1956, whereby the Town voted to appropriate 
a sum of money for the purchase of a dump truck equipped with a snow plow and spreader body, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4 of Article 4 of the Town By-laws by striking 
out the same and substituting in place thereof the following: 

SECTION 4. The committee shall seven days prior to any town meeting at which Articles 
contained in the Warrant are to be acted upon, prepare, publish and distribute by leaving 
copies thereof in the office of the Town Clerk, their report and recommendations on such 
Articles. For each annual town meeting for the transaction of business, such reports and 
recommendations shall show in detail the anticipated income and expenditures of the Town 
for the then current year and copies thereof shall at least seven days prior to such meeting 
be mailed to the registered voters of the Town or made available to such registered voters 
of the Town or made available to such registered voters as may desire to obtain the same 
in such other manner as the committee may in its discretion determine: 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to 
appoint a Historical Committee, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Pineridge Road as app- 
roved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assess- 
ment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein 
mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by the right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be neces- 
sary to effect the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing 
said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct Carolyn Road as a public way as laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the 
Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope 
and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the Article and to see how 
much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how such appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICEL 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Boutwell 
Street as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board accord 
ing to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right 
of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the 



100 



purpose of the Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine 
how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, 
or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Middlesex 
Avenue as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board 
according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by 
Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of the Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and deter- 
mine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the 
treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Glen Road 
as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to 
a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the pur- 
pose of the Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine 
how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, 
or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept Dorothy Avenue as a public town way as laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen and approved by the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town 
Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and the Town Manager to execute and 
deliver on behalf of the Town a deed of release running to John and Rose McSheffrey of said Wilmington to 
all rights in a certain portion of land lying on the northerly side of Boutwell Street in said Wilmington which 
was taken by the Board of Selectmen by eminent domain through inadvertence in excess of the area actually 
intended to be taken- the area to be released being that set forth in the following description: Beginning at 
a drill hole in a stone wall in the northerly corner of land belonging to John W. & Eva M. Parsons; thence 
N 44^ 57' 30" W 166. 66 feet to an iron pipe; thence N 39^ 04' 10" E by land of Nicholas and Marion L. Solas 
5. 03 feet; thence S 44° 57' 30" E by land of the Town of Wilmington 166. 66 feet to a stone wall; thence 
S 39 °04' 10" W 5. 03 feet along said stone wall to the point of beginning. Containing 833. 30 square feet, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building Committee. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-laws by inserting therein a new chapter 
numbered, entitled and reading as follows, or do anything in relation thereto: 

"Chapter 5a. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE OPERATION OF 
MOTOR-DRIVEN BOATS IN THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON. 

Section 1. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat unless he shall have first registered the same 

with the Chief of Police and obtained a certificate of registration together with a registration 
number for the boat which shall be displayed on both sides of the bow in numerals at least 
six inches high. Said numerals may be painted on removal boards. The Chief of Police may 
revoke the registration of any boat, the operator of which has been convicted of violating any 
of the rules or regulations contained in this chapter. 

Section 2. No motor-driven boat shall be operated unless the motor has an underwater exhaust or is 

equipped with a muffler which complies with the standards set up by the Department of Public 
Safety. 

Section 3. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wil- 

mington at such a speed or in such a manner as to endanger the lives and safety of others or 
the property of others or in such a manner as to cause danger of collision with other water- 

101 



craft or in such a manner as to create excessive wash or wake so as to interfere with the 
operation and safety of other watercraft, endanger bathers or damage property. 



Section 4. The operation of a motor -driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilmington und« 
conditions and/or in places or areas as hereinafter indicated at speeds greater than as so in- 
dicated shall be considered to be in violation of these rules and regulations, 

(a) When approaching or leaving the shore or a pier or when passing within one hundred feet of 
a bather or bathing area or another boat or when passing within one hundred feet of the shore 
except in a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no 
dwellings exist, three miles per hour. |p 

(b) When passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred feet distant from a bather or 
Bathing area or another boat or when passing within two hundred feet of but over one hundred 
feet distant from the shore except in a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and un- 
improved and where no dwellings exist, seven miles per hour. ^ 

(c) When passing within five hundred feet of but over two hundred feet distant from the shore 
except in a location where the shore is entirely undeveloped and unimproved and where no 
dwellings exist, ten miles per hour. 

(d) In any location during the hours from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sun 
rise, seven miles per hour. 

Section 5. During the period commencing one -half hour after sunset and ending one -half hour before sun- 
rise every motor -driven boat shall display a fully visible white light. 

Section 6. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilming- 
ton within fifty feet of a bather or bathing area at any time except for life-saving purposes. 

Section 7. No person shall operate a motor-driven boat on any lake, pond or river in the Town of Wilming- 
ton while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. 



Section 8. Row boats, canoes and sailing boats shall have the right of way at all times. 

Section 9. The above rules and regulations are to be enforced by authorized police officials of the Town of 
Wilmington, and the violation of the above rules and regulations shall for each offense be punish 
ed by a fine of not more than Twenty ($20. 00) Dollars. 



Request of the Board of Selectmen. 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out Paragraph 13 of 
Section III-3 A thereof and substituting therefor the following; 

"13. Commercial parking lot or parking garage, filling or service station, salesroom 
for new automobiles, open lot for parking or sale of new or used automobiles when operated 
in connection with, and on the same site as, such a salesroom, salesroom for boats 
trailers, trucks, farm implements or farm machinery." 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by adding a new paragraph to be 

numbered 3a following Paragraph 3 of Section III-3b thereof reading as follows; 

"3a. Open lot for parking or sale of used automobiles not operated in connection with a 
salesroom for new automobiles." or do anything in relation thereto. 

Request of the Planning Board. 

102 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Industrial 
to General Business District the following described parcel of land: Beginning at the center line intersections 
of Main Street and Bridge Lane thence 900 feet N 78° 15'22" E; thence 550 feet S 60° 44' 38" E; thence 1, 394. 83 
feet, S 29° 15' 22" W; thence 250 feet, S 11° 44' 38" E; thence 400 feet, S 78°15' 22" W to the center line of 
Main Street; thence 1, 653. 52 feet along center line of Main Street N 11° 44' 38" W to the point of beginning, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Resident A to Industrial the following parcel of land, being a part of a sub-division known as Ox Pasture, off 
Woburn Street in the southerly part of Wilmington: 

Beginning at a point in the center line of Woburn Street, 240 feet from the extension of the 
southerly side of Morse Avenue; thence southerly 210 feet along Woburn Street; thence 
easterly 1300 feet along the existing zoning boundary, thence northerly 230 feet in a 
direction parallel with Woburn Street; thence westerly 1301 feet to the point of beginning. 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by inserting a new sub-section 
numbered, entitled and reading as follows, or do anything in relation thereto: 

SECTION III-3 USES IN GENERAL BUSINESS DISTRICTS 

A. In a general business district the following uses are hereby permitted: 

21. A direct consumer, and/or commercial service type dry-cleaning plant establishment. 
Request of Mary S. Pizzuti and others. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map by changing from 
Single Resident A to Neighborhood Business District, the following described parcel of land: 

! 

A certain parcel of land in the easterly part of Wilmington, starting at the corner of Lowell 
and West Street; thence northerly along West Street to a point, two hundred twenty-five 
(225) feet south of Westdale Avenue; thence westerly five hundred eighty (580) feet parallel 
with Westdale Avenue; thence southerly by land now or formerly of Ruth and Howard 
Edwards to Lowell Street; thence southeasterly by Lowell Street to the point of beginning. 

or do anything else in relation thereto. Request of John J. Elia and others. 

■ ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from SINGLE 
RESIDENCE A to NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS DISTRICT th^ following described parcel of land: 

The land in the Southern part of Wilmington and bounded, NORTHERLY by Lot B on a plan 
hereinafter mentioned one hundred seventy one and 40/100 feet; EASTERLY by Lot 19 
seventy-five feet; SOUTHERLY by Burlington Avenue one hundred thirty-two feet; WESTERLY 
by Forest Street eighty-seven and 04/100 feet; said parcel being shown as Lot A on a plan 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry Deeds Book of Plans 63 Plan 87A 

[jar do anything in relation thereto. Request of Theresa Bedell and others. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 4 of Chapter 2 of the Town By-laws by striking 
but the same and substituting in place thereof the following: 



103 



"Section 4. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by posting printed copies of the 
warrant for such meeting in five or more public places in the town, not less than seven 
days before the time named in the warrant for holding said meeting." 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 1 1 of Chapter 2 of the Town By-Laws by 
striking out the same and substituting in place thereof the following: 

"Section 11. Before any action is taken on any motion carrying an expenditure or appro- 
priation of money the Moderator shall call upon the Finance Committee for its report and 
recommendation thereon. " 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 2 of the Town By-Laws by adding at the end 
thereof the following new section: 

"Section 22. Failure to comply with any requirements contained in Section 5, Section 6, 
Sectioii 7, Section 8, Section 10, Section 11 or Section 21 of this Chapter shall not 
invalidate any vote or action of the Town." 

or do anything m relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 4 of the Town By-Laws by adding at the end 
thereof the following new section: 

"Section 5. Failure to comply with any requirement contained in either Section 3 
or Section 4 of this chapter shall not invalidate any vote or action of the Town." 

or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a certain sum of money to be used for 
the establishment of a Public Health Laboratory, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board 
of Health. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Junior Senior High School Building Committee 
with the approval of the School Committee to have prepared and made up a suitable bronze bust plaque or 
bas-relief of Dudley A. Buck, former School Committee Chairman as a memorial to be placed in the Junior| 
Senior High School. The cost to come from available funds of the unexpended balance of a bond issue pre- '■ 
viously authorized by vote of the Town for constructing, equipping and furnishing the addition to the Junior 
Senior High School, or be raised by transfer from available fvmds or by taxation as the Town may vote, or 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Junior Senior High School Building Committee and the School 
Committee. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appro- 
priate the sum of three hundred dollars ($300. 00) or any other sum therefor, for the Wilmington Council for 
the Aging or to do anything else in relation thereto. Request of Frank H. McLean and others. 

ARTICL E 56. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Town Manager to appoint a committee of five 
members; said committee to investigate and report to the next annual town meeting or earlier on the 
possibility of the town constructing an outdoor skating rink having mechanical refrigeration, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of Larz Neilson and others. 



104 



TTOwmi A c (C © un iKJir A. iKi T 



ANALYSIS OF THE CASH ACCOUNT - for the year ending December 31, 1959 
RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1959 



Balance as at January 1, 1959 

Add: Cash Receipts January 1 through December 31, 1959 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures during year 1959 
Balance on Hand as at December 31, 1959 - Carried forward to I960 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



788, 815. 1 1 
3 , 705, 269 . 67 
4, 494, 084. 78 
4, 050, 305. 98 

443, 778. 80 



TAXES 



Tax Collections: 

Prior years; levy: Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 

Current year's levy: Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 

Street Assessments Added to Tax Bills 

Water Assessments Added to Tax Bills 

Apportioned Street Betterments Paid in Advance 

Apportioned Water Betterments Paid in Advance 

Refund Checks Returned/Taxpayers 



4. 

64, 



58. 00 
953. 56 
359. 40 

37. 45 



5, 
56, 
335, 



358. 00 
318. 38 
152. 07 
202. 64 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Grants: 
Charitie s 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 12, 057. 50 

Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 1, 587. 55 
Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Admin. 
Disability Assistance, Assist. 
Disability Assistance, Admin. 
Reimbursements from Recipients: 
Old Age Assistance 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Schools 

Smith-Hughes & Geo. Barden Account 
Public Law 874 

National Defense Education Act 85/864 
Public Grants 

Construction Grants-in-Aid (Highways) 
Comm. of Mass. Chap. 81 ^90 
Middlesex Cty. Treas. Chap. 90 
Federal Planning Grant #1 



40, 431. 


24 


3, 769. 


97 


1, 969. 


07 


203. 


20 


523. 


24 


2, 232. 


80 



13, 645. 05 
44, 192. 21 
2, 172. 27 

2, 755. 04 



127. 


00 


17, 040. 


00 


4, 002. 


90 


37, 181. 


58 


11, 153. 


42 



69, 408. 41 



1, 397, 031. 09 



62, 765. 57 



21, 169. 90 



48, 335. 00 



1, 466, 439. 50 
4, 693. 34 
64. 13 
4, 669. 84 
1, 073. 09 
2, 335. 69 
1, 439. 52 
2, 710. 73 
128. 00 



132, 270. 47 
19, 600. 00 



105 



RECEIPTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION - BUT NOT APPROPRIATED 



Repayments, Middlesex County Dog Officer 

Accrued Interest - Sale of Bonds 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Refunds from Appropriation 

Returned Checks/Taxpayers 

Recoveries O. A. A. Lien Law 

Water Department: 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Betterments 

Committed Interest on Water Betterments 
Miscellaneous Water Receipts 
Deferred Water Betterment Interest 



1,826. 


33 


549. 


27 


24, 992. 


21 


14, 629. 


03 


213. 


87 


10, 926. 


96 


94, 322. 


38 


5, 774. 


18 


4, 412. 


73 


1, 738. 


31 


80. 


48 


113. 


30 



159, 579. 05 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



Short Term: 

To pay expenditures of Town Depts. until 

taxes are collected 850,000.00 
To carry on Chap. 81 & 90 work until 

State &c Cty. reimbursements are 

received 40, 525. 00 

Temp. Loans in Anticipation of Serial 
Issue 70, OOP. 00 

Long Term: 

Proceeds from sale of bonds 
Highway Garage &c Police Building 

AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 

Federal Withholding Taxes Deducted 
State Withholding Taxes Deducted 
Retirement System Deductions 
Blue Cross /Shield Deductions 
Group Life Insurance Deductions 
U. S. Savings Bonds Deducted 

Dog Licenses, Collected for Middlesex County Dog Officer 
Fish &£ Game Licenses, Collected for Dept. of Conservation 
Cemetery Trust Funds 



960, 525. 00 



140, 000. 00 



136, 514. 16 
10, 144. 71 
22, 835. 54 
8, 644. 05 

1, 585. 62 
225. 00 

2, 391. 75 
1, 802. 50 

600. 00 



1, 100, 525. 00 

n 



184, 743. 33 



RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION - RESTRICTED USES 



Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Selectmen's Land Sales 

Refunds from Previous Years' Appropriations 
Tailings 



3, 495. 00 
3, 686. 65 
88. 30 
385. 03 



7, 654. 98 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

Petty Cash Fund 



74, 801. 70 
2, 959. 85 
150. 21 



77, 91 1. 76 



106 



4 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income Taxes 
Corporation Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Collections: 
Prior Years' Levy- 
Current Year' s Levy- 
Refund Checks returned/Taxpayers 

Licenses, Liquor 

Interest and Costs: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 
Tax Collections 

Committed Interest on As se s sment /Street Betterments 
General Government: 
Selectmen's Receipts 

To-wn Collector's Receipts, Miscellaneous 

Town Clerk's Receipts 

Assessors' Receipts 
Protection of Persons and Property: 

Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 1,362.00 
Plumbing Permits 1,989.50 
Wire Permits 1, 1 1 1. 50 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Tree Department 

Police Department 
Public Works: 

To-wn Engineer 

Sno-w & Ice Removal /State 

Highway, Misc. 

Cemetery Department 
Board of Health: 

Sanitarian's Licenses & Permits 

Public Health Nurse's Receipts 

Div. of Tuberculosis - State Reimb. 

Clinics 

Charities & Soldiers Benefits: 

General Relief 2,358.07 

Disability Assistance 2, 763. 89 

Old Age Assistance 37,869.92 

Aid to Dependent Children 9, 208. 85 

Veterans Benefits 

Welfare Dept. /Office Space Rent 

Disability Assist. Admin. /State Treas. Reimb. 
Schools and Libraries: 

School Construction Reimbursements 

School Transportation Reimbursements 

Vocational Training Reimbur sements /State 

English Speaking Classes 

Miscellaneous High School Receipts 

Adult Evening School Tuition 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Public Library Receipts 
Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Meal Tax/State Treasurer 

4th District Court Fines 

Accrued Interest/Tax Antic. Notes 

Insurance Dividends & Reimbursements 

Various Miscellaneous Receipts 

107 



20, 034. 38 
104, 737. 67 
32. 39 



574. 01 
4, 637. 81 
816. 22 

992. 14 
1,010. 50 
3, 059. 54 
28. 00 



4, 463. 00 
189. 15 
337. 50 
230. 75 

75. 86 
61. 75 
348. 00 
3, 219. 50 

1, 044. 21 
610. 00 
127. 14 
294. 05 



52, 200. 73 
8, 460. 75 
407. 72 
101. 60 

100, 515. 29 
25, 938. 63 
3, 901. 21 
210. 00 
719. 68 
2, 429. 60 
11, 986. 45 



2, 726. 58 
35. 00 
421. 39 
905. 40 
924. 27 



157, 548. 91 
18, 420. 79 



124, 804. 44 
4, 000. 00 



6, 028. 04 



5, 090. 18 



5, 220. 40 



3, 705. 1 1 



2, 075. 40 



61, 170. 80 



145, 700. 86 
663. 67 



5, 012. 64 



3, 705, 269. 67 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



Balances Added Paid off 





as at 




during 


during 




1/1/59 




1959 


1959 




INSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 












High School Loan, Act 321/47 












$265, 000. 00 


145, 000. 


00 




15, 000. 


00 


Elementary School Loan, Wildwood 












ocnool, K-ji-i oec. iu, ^nap. 












$512, 000. 00 


375, 000. 


00 




25, 000. 


00 


Fire/Police Station Loan, GL 












Sec. 10, Chap. 44 $60, 000 


35, 000. 


00 




5, 000. 


00 


Public Sewer Mains, GL Sec. 10 












Chap. 44 $106, 000. 00 


106, 000. 


00 




15, 000. 


00 


Street Construction Bonds (1956) 












Sec. 10, Chap. 44 GL $30, 000 


22, 000. 


00 




8, 000. 


00 


Street Construction Bonds ( 1958) 












Sec. 10, Chap. 44 GL $60, 000 


60, 000. 


00 




6, 000. 


00 


Public Works Building & Police 












Station Bonds, Sec. 10, 












Chap. 44 GL $140, 000 






140, 000. 00 








743, 000. 


00 


140, 000. 00 


74, 000. 


00 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 












High School Loan, Acts 321/47 












$200, 000. 00 


120, 000. 


00 




10, 000. 


00 


Addit. & Alter. Jr/Sr High School 












Acts 645/48 $1,375,000.00 


1, 195, 000. 


00 




80, 000. 


00 


Addit. & Alter. Jr/Sr High School 












Acts 645/48 $400,000.00 


400, 000. 


00 




20, 000. 


00 


Glen Road School Bonds, Acts 












645/48 $450,000.00 


450, 000. 


00 




LiO t uuu. 


nn 
uu 


First Water Main Extension, 












Sec. 8, Chap. 44 $75, 000. 00 


15, 000. 


00 




5, 000. 


00 


Water Bonds, New Well Field, 












Sec. 8, Chap. 44 $60,000.00 


40, 000. 


00 




5, 000. 


00 


Water Meters, Improving Existing 












System & Betterments, Sec. 8 












Chap. 44 $145, 000. 00 


126, 000. 


00 




19, 000. 


00 


Water Standpipe Bonds, Sec. 8 












Chap. 44 $152, 000. 00 


152, 000. 


00 




12, 000. 


00 


Water Main Bonds (1957) Sec. 8 












Chap. 44 $35, 000. 00 


35, 000. 


00 




5, 000. 


00 


Water Main Bonds (1958) Sec. 8 












Chap. 44 $50, 000. 00 


50, 000. 


00 




4, 000. 


00 




2, 583, 000. 


00 




185, 000. 


00 


COMBINED TOTALS 


3, 326, 000. 


00 


140, 000. 00 


259, 000. 


00 



108 



SCHEDULE OF SHORT TERM LOANS 



Balance Added Paid off Balances 

as at during during as at 

1/1/59 1959 1959 12/31/59 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation 

of Tax Collections 850,000.00 850,000.00 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation 

of Reimbursements (Highways) 39,975.00 40,525.00 57,975.00 22,525.00 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation 

of Serial Issues/Bonds 70, 000. 00 70, 000. 00 

TOTALS 39,975.00 960,525.00 977,975.00 22,525.00 



LOANS AUTHORIZED BUT NOT ISSUED 
Boutwell School Bonds 400, 000. 00 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS' IN SETTING THE 1959 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF YEAR ENDING 12/31/59 





Used by the 


Actual 




Receipts 


Receipts 




Assessors on 


1959 




more than 


Less than 




the 1959 


Rate 


Receipt 


s 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Income Tax 


146, 576, 


39 


157, 548. 


91 


10, 972 


52 




Corporation Tax 


15, 070. 


78 


18, 420. 


79 


3, 350 


01 




Reimbursements Publicly Owned Land 


64. 


13 


64. 


13 








Old Age Tax (Meals) 


2, 326. 


09 


2, 726. 


58 


400 


49 




Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 


130, 000. 


00 


119, 448. 


13 






10, 551. 87 


License s 


4, 000. 


00 


4, 000. 


00 








Special Assessments 


4, 000. 


00 


3, 300. 


97 






699. 03 


General Government 


4, 500. 


00 


5, 090. 


18 


590 


18 




Protection of Persons & Property 


5, 500. 


00 


5, 217. 


40 






282. 60 


Health & Sanitation 


2, 500. 


00 


2, 070. 


40 






429. 60 


Charities (Other than Grants) 


19, 000. 


00 


16, 878. 


08 






2, 121. 92 


Old Age Assistance (Other than 
















Federal Grants) 


37, 000. 


00 


39, 509. 


95 


2, 509 


95 




Veterans Services 


6, 000. 


00 


8, 460. 


75 


2, 460 


75 




Schools (Income Tax not to be incl. ) 


28, 000. 


00 


45, 185. 


57 


17, 185 


57 




Librarie s 


500. 


00 


653. 


67 


153 


67 




Cemeterie s 


3, 900. 


00 


3,219. 


50 






680. 50 


Interests 


4, 400. 


00 


5, 632. 


51 


1, 232 


51 




State As si stance /School Construction 
















Projects 


77, 176. 


47 


100, 515. 


29 


23, 338 


82 




Farm Animal Excise Tax 


200. 


00 


240. 


09 


40 


09 




Unclassified 


5, 000. 


00 


2, 282. 


30 






2, 717. 70 


Sewer Rental 


4, 000. 


00 










4, 000. 00 


TOTALS 


499, 713. 


86 


540, 465. 


20 


62, 234. 56 


21, 483. 22 



109 



H a, 
S < 



73 



3 .a O 



<; 

ni Li 



o, H =a 

O c "1 

H -5 

nj 01 



O 



nO O o ^ 

r- 00 iTi iTi ro 
— I pj ^ — m ro 



^ M rn (M 



LriinLnoO'<}"or-rriooo 
r-fNj^vOininajpjoooo 



rO O 00 



OiMOOOvOOOrooO 
OiTiOOOCOO^f^^iTt 



roo^OsOo^CT^oc^vOmooir^rorj-sDrsjiTiOvOr^m 

U-|(M-^'<l'00O^(S100— 'Or-O^iTio^vDroOOpOOOO 

o^r-'^inco(NjCT-OvOCT-'H(vjinT}<vOroooooiriooooro 



o o o o o 
o o o in o 



CO O sD ^ 



oooooooo 
oooooooo 



OOOOOOoOOnO-* 
OOOO-^rorJO— 100 



ooiAinosiooooroorO'^a^ 
r^oo-'firia^Lrioo^oo^^i^ 



(V) 00 r- — ' 



o o o o 
o o o o 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 



oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 



ooooovD'^oO'*oOLnin(vjoooo(siopoooo 
oooO'^miMO— loor- oo-*ino^Lriotr-ooo^"^ 



o — ' po 00 



nj n 

aj n) 0) 
0) *j W W 



L. U 



a 

W c 
." o 



a, 

W W 



c c 



0) >- C 



a 

'ni ,>< 



in W 



DC Ofl 

c c 

ni 

2 2 



U 4-. 4-> Ll >J O O 

o c c 3 :3 -^^ r; 

cl^ 3 d cfl tfl 

O O rt n! 



C 



U O Li t- 

< <; H H 



s M 1^ i ^ 

0) .^1 o o 
W (ti t( H H 



C m 



C C 

o o 



c c 
o o 



o o 

O U 

c c 

o o 



^ ^ - 

h L (0 

(U <U Li 

U G S 

C C oj 

> ? m 

O O m 

H H <; 



in C 

2 

o o 

CO O 
U) O 



nJ >< L. 

W W nJ 
O 

^" ^" CQ 

K K .5 

c c c 

H H Ph 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



o o o o 
— I o o 
r- 00 iTi (M 



3 



3 



I .2 







o 






O 






o 










r- 






rO 






in 
















00 










d 












in 










ro 






■<1" 










-O 






00 






















ro 


o 




o 






o 


o 




o 




<M 


o 




r- 






CO 


o 


(M 


in 




rO 


d 










00 


d 


■<r 






d 


o 










in 


o 


CO 






(M 


o 








r- 




in 








00 










in 














I 








in 














a- 




o 






o 






o 


o 


00 


00 


-o 






rj 


(VJ 


-o 


r~ 


in 


o 


-o 


d 




r~ 




ro 








in 


o 


o 




00 


00 




m 








in 


o 


in 






o 




rJ 




ro 






in 






r- 


(M 
















■"f 






















ro 




vO 


o 




o 


o 


vO 


o 


o 


o 


O 


00 


sO 


o 




O 


in 




o 


o 


o 


O 


sD 




d 




d 


iri 






o 


o 






00 


o 




O 


r- 


fM 


(M 


o 


o 


00 


•<»< 








o 




00 


00 


o 


in 






r- 


r-l 




in 






I- 


(\J 




r- 


r~ 








I— 




vD 








rO 




•£> 




o 


o 


o o 










O 


00 


vD 




o 


o 


in o 










O 


d 






d 


d 


in" o 










d 








o 


o 


o 


o 








00 




(M 




00 


o 


00 00 


rJ 
















■<1<" 


o 


■<»•" 










r- 










v~ 














u 


U 




T) 


D 




u 










o 


o 


o 


O 






o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


O 






o 


o 


o 


o 





o o o 

(M PO O O 

vO 00 o in 



(J Cfi (D 

z 



X 3 



w w cu u 



c 
v 

B 

< I 

00 D. 
in 0) 



to 



(U 
u 



X 
u 

3 
u 
H 
u 

g ^ 

m ™ 
CD ^ 



c O ^ 



^ w u ^ u a 



> o- 



m o 







cr- 






o 


(U 




in 


o 




o 


<J 












c 










r- 


n) 


CO 




in 












00 






n) 


(\] 








« 



















V 


M 




Xl 


c 




c 




in 


<u 


u 




a 


D 




X 






W 







o 

O — ' 

o (si 

o ^ 

M 00 



in 

rj in 



(vj o o o o 
o o o o o 



<7- in — I o ■'f ro o 
00 O m ro (T* 



O 

GO 



o 



o o 
o o 



(SI vO O 

o in CO 



o 
rg 00 

(\J M 



00 O 
in rg o 



sO 

o in 00 



o — . ^ 



— ^ 



in ro 
o o 
in ^ 



000-^0^^>00^0o0 
ooOvDinoinTi<oo 



cr o ^ 
(M 00 
MM-* 



00 o 
in rj o 
o — I 



o 
— ' o 



OO^— '00— '-^vD 
-HO — ■ ro _ 

00 —I -I 



in (vj — 



c^^inoooinrsao^m 



<M 00 O 
m o 



cr^ (Nj o 

o in {\j in CT^ o 
vo — ' r~- m ^ M 



o ro 
(sj (VJ in 
rj 00 



— ' vO o o 
r- CT^ o 
in in 



ooroooroinino^ 
o--«ro(\]ooinoo 



O O in rO — • 
o — • 00 
o 't — 



in (Nj in 



— ' rO O in 00 o o 



rj o ■* o o o 
o in o o o 



o o o o 
o o o o 



O vO o 

cr 



o o 
o 



in o ^ — I o CO 



CT^ O O 
vO in ro in Tj^ 
ro m o 



o o ^ 
in o 
o in fNj 



o o o o 
o o o o 
o r- in in 



vO o o 
o o 
rj 00 



o in o ro o o — ' 
o O o O 00 
O O O O — ' 



— O o o 
r- o ^ o o 

00 ^ 00 — ' o 



in rj 00 in 



(VJ -< 



ro O O 



r-H (0 

CQ ^ iu 

S C 



ft H 
c 

? M 

o c 

C 
C 



to 



o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 



o o o o o 
o o CO in o 

o o (VJ o 

ro 



> ui u d o 



o r- o 

rv-l O -H O 



O 00 
O 00 (V4 



o o o in 

O O O (VJ 
O 00 M in 



in o (VJ o 

O vO o 

o o — ' 



M (fl J3 J3 43 J3 



o 00 po 

T}< r- o 

in (VJ 

r 



O O P3 O O O 

o o o o o o 



o o o o 
o o o o 



o o o o 
o o o o 



D 
D 

< 

<u 

c 

•f-( 

o 

o 



o o o o o o 

O O O O O — ' 

o o — ' ov in ^ 



o o o o o 
in o in 'J' o o 
(VJ ro o (^ 



vO o 
in o <y- 
o in (VJ 



o o o o 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 
o in o o o 



o o 
o ■<»• o 

Tf CO — 



in rvj r- in 



— ' T}< (VJ ro 

(VJ — . 



§1 

(J "f 
,1 *-* 



>• c 

I- (U 

^ a 
w W 



a a 

C C 



^ t-H HH 



00 OS 

c c 



jO v3 

5 o 



C 13C " " 

3 3 

U Q CQ ca 



™ in 

^ ^« 

£ W W 

D. S C C 

D. ^ (u m 

<; ? XI T3 

U, 4) (U (U 



c 

c o 
S o 

2 



(0 (/) H H 



W 

4-> t-U 

3 >. 

Q O 



(Tl t- 

to <U 
HI 

^: .S 

(U 00 

(U C 

C u 

c c 

W 5 

o « 

H <; 



c 

0) .. 

W ?i 

B 



(u a 

C (U 

•S)Q 
c ^ 



a- 
in in 



<; O i 



C ^ 

a * 
X -o 

^ O 
OS 



o u 

C C 

(fl (fl 

C C 

(U <u 

H 5 

(3 (5 



u 2 2 oJ 



^1 a 
2 w ft 



a 



„ « 3 3 
0) V V oo ^ u u 



h h 



a a a ^ 

ti (i <C n 

ji X £ c 

O O O w 



H (B 0) 

fee 
i O O 
in O O 



o *^ 
H I* 
m 

BO 

O " <n 

a j3 i< j3 

C 3 n) 3 
kS ft ft ft 



to 



00 

c 
U 

H 

(U 
(0 

>. 
to 

i) ■ 

60 



'-< H C b 

^ 5 c ■? 



V <u 



00 



.5 O 
_ 
(fl 

H a 
e o 
(3 c 

o 5 



C (0 

c c 

C O 




s 

^ w 2 

nl u 
rn o 



<u 

0) 3 

(J OJ IT) 
C > 
nj <U 

PQ o 



•V 

o- ^ 
W 



ro 00 



<i < >2 

nj I-' 

.2 "1 o 

I- ^ 

D, H oa 



60 
C 



o o in o o 

O O CT^ O O 



'I" o in o o 
00 o o in o 
o o 00 o 



o — o 
00 o in 
o o 



vO CO in 00 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



C ( 



o o o o 



O CT^ — I O 



CO in 00 



O O vD 

i-o i\j rg 
— I a- 



O -1 o 
in o o 



— ' a- o 

ro (M O 
—1 ro (vj 



o o o 
o o o 



o o o 
— . o pg 



m 00 

(M 



O 
O — ■ 



O 



O 00 

r- o 



— ' O 
00 M 



O O 
O 



O O 
O 



O 
00 t> 



™ 1) 



- a 

u X 

-3 2 f 

c 

w o, m 



c 









j-j 




o 




(U 






a 


O 




(U 


Q 


00 




u 








3 






o 


Oh 



W 



^ > 



"3 " Ul TO 



o o 

00 rO OO 00 

(M — ' in 



o nD 

O (VJ --I ro 



O Tt> o O 

00 rO 00 00 

(\j — I in 



o ^ — ' 
O (VJ — ' -O 



o o in 
o 00 CO 

00 sO 



o o o o 
o o o o 



o o 
00 in 
o — • 



o o o o 
o o o o 



o o o in 
00 in o o 
vO o~- PJ 



a- -H -H Tl< 



o 

N* 

O 
vO 





o 




00 








o 


in 


r- 






o 














r- 


r- 










00 




o 


00 


ro 














Hi; 
















in 


O- 


PJ 






(5 








CO 








§ 






m 








00 








00 




















00 




































PJ 
























00 


-a 






o 


in 


r- 






o 








ro 




•* 


r- 




vD 








00 


O 


o 


00 


ro 








00 




a~ 


r- 


ro 




r- 




PJ 


o 


in 


in 


a- 






a- 


PJ 








00 






o 














rO 


00 








CO 






sD 














00 






m 






























PJ 






















o 






a- 




O 


m 


ro 


ro 


PJ 


o 






O 








PJ 


PJ 


m 




o 


CO 






o 




sD 


in 






O 


rO 


o 


in 




o 


PJ 


00 




o 






in 


in 


00 


O 


r- 


o 




in 


PJ 


CO 


ro 


00 




PJ 




o 






r- 




rO 




rO 


o 


o 




a- 






00 


in 


r~ 




00 


■<«• 


O 


00 


■-D 


o 










po" 


ro 








pj 






00 




PJ 


























00 


















o 


o 


O 


pj 


o 


o 


r- 


O 


o 


O 


o 




o 


o 


O 


o 


o 




r~- 


o 


o 


CT- 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


pj 


O 


o 


O 


o 


PJ 


o 


o 


O 


in 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


ro 


o 




O 


o 




o 


rO 


in 








O 


o 




o 


in 




o 


a- 


in 






00 




r~ 


CO 


t~- 


00 


o 


PJ 


vO 




o 








PJ 


ro 








ro 










PJ 


























o- 






















O 


PJ 






PJ 














o 








vD 


r- 
















o 




o 










oo' 






oo" 










PJ 




d 






























CO 








vO 
















in 




PJ 






































t 


n) 
















nJ 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


PJ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


'I' 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


in 


00 


r~ 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


in 






o 


o 


o 




a- 


in 


o 


o 


cr- 


o 




in 


00 




r~ 


in 


r- 


00 


o 








o 








PJ 


ro 








d 










PJ 















o o 
in o 
PJ — 



o o o 
o o o 



in o 
PJ — ' 



0) ^ 



X 



< 



C " 

n) X 

>H 3 

H <; 



3 

o 



w O 



n) u 
O w w 



in 
XI 

c 
o 

c 



o2i 



►5 OS 







u 




c 












CO 








CO 




CO 




<; 












00 




V 




J 




°s 






u 




o 


■M 


O 


H 


c 


X 




n) 





H 


H 



0) CQ 



O >. l-( 

<^ m 
^ Q 3 



> a ° 

^- w ^ 

« o 



o 



01 



4) 

C ^ in 
« o 



5 60 

5 in 



CO ^ C 
5 > ^ 



CO 

PQ <u 

^ (1) 

O C i 

? I) 

O 

_ .1:; t< 

'zi a. 



o CO o 
o -I o 



o o o 
o 



Tl 

c a 

SI 
w 



I- o 



!^ c 
> .1: o 

►5 u< o 



00 

c 

3 

2 




<; 



c 
o 
u 

c 
o 

• rH 



CO 

in ^ 

£ B 

o o 



5 



1 ^ 

^ Oh 



c 
B 

CO 

- 3 J3 

cx ° 

00 o 

3 o 



(U 3 J, 

I > 2 

C (u c 



0^3 

a ■ 



f 00 

lUo^-Orr ".rf n! 3 V 
05 - CCQClJ«tnw<< 



4! )- " 



E 6 CP 

° O >« 

I. O 

»- ^' ^ 

CO (A OJ 

ecu 

nl ni O 

t4 h 

H H CL, 



£ S g 




B B ^ 



>^ M M H h Ih 

VH ™ »^ 

fcl l< J h 1^ 1^ 

tf) CO fv to 01 CO 

C C c C C C 

IT) (;! C (4 nl n) 

lU t, 

H H H H H H 



<t X> ut) a>i» u>j3.,4'^^ 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/59 



REFUNDS : 
T axe s 

Prior Years 2, 207. 32 

Current Levy 

Poll Tax 18.00 
Real Estate 6, 961. 58 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Prior Years 559.79 
Current Levy 4, 796. 52 

Water Liens 1959 

Street Assessments Added to Taxes 
Committed Street Interest Added to Taxes 
Water Rates 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Interest & Costs - Tax Collect. &c Tax Titles Redeemed 
Building Inspector Fees 
Sanitary Inspection Fee 

Total Refunds Paid: 



9. 186. 90 



5, 356. 31 
56. 18 
15. 82 
12. 04 



14, 627. 25 
199. 12 
5, 127. 77 
23. 10 
3. 00 
5. 00 
19, 985. 24 



Petty Cash Advances 
Legal Settlements Paid 
State & County Assessments: 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Tax Assessment 

County Retirement Assessment 

State Parks Assessment 

State Audit Assessment 
Agency & Trust Funds: 

Blue Cross/Shield 

Withholding Deductions, Federal 

Withholding Deductions, State 

Retirement System Deductions 

Group Insurance Deductions 

Dog Licenses Collected for County 

Fish & Game Licenses Due Dept. Conservation 

Cemetery Trust Funds 

U. S. Savings Bonds 
Town Functions (Not appropriated) 

School Lunch Program 

High School Sthletic Association 

Water Department Maintenance & Operation 

Water Betterments - 1957 

Water Betterments - 1958 

Construction of New Standpipe 

Tailings Account 

Street Betterments - 1958 

Additions & Alterations Jr/Sr High School 

Construction of Glen Road School 



65. 00 
1, 443. 97 



5, 670. 47 
17, 355. 88 
16, 931. 01 
3, 565. 57 
3, 854. 24 



39, 957. 36 

7, 419. 81 

8, 644. 05 
136, 514. 16 
10, 144. 71 
22, 835. 54 

2, 906. 87 
2, 398. 00 
1, 802. 50 

600. 00 
225. 00 

72, 971. 85 

3, 844. 64 
116, 561. 33 

360. 00 
10, 128. 06 
8, 140. 00 
50. 00 
6, 851. 34 
133, 423. 93 
338, 123. 27 



47, 377. 17 



186, 070. 83 



690, 454. 42 



114 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS (Continued) 



Federal Grants & Aid 

Federal Planning Grant #1 19, 600. 00 

Public Law 874 - Federal Aid to Schools 5, 608. 75 25, 208. 75 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 10, 045. 60 

Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 2, 007. 34 12,052.94 

Old Age Assistance - Assistance 38,085.42 

Old Age Assistance - Administration 3, 827. 33 41,912.75 

Disability Assistance, Aid 3,889.95 

Disability Assistance, Administration 238. 73 4, 128. 68 83,303.12 

Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Revenue /Taxe s 850, 000. 00 

Anticipation of Serial Issue Loans 70, 000. 00 

Anticipation of Reimbursement /Highway 57, 975. 00 977,975.00 

Land Court Entry Fee-Tax Title Takings 231. 00 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNTS 2, 006, 905. 75 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS - Year Ending 12/31/59 



On Hand 
1/1/59 



Trusts 
Added 
1959 



Inte re st 
Received 
1959 



Balance 
on Hand 
12/31/59 



Cemetery Trust Funds 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Andover Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



501. 17 
2, 457. 45 
17, 654. 20 



500. 00 



15. 75 
80. 36 
560. 23 



516. 92 
2, 537. 81 
18, 714. 43 



S. D. A. Carter Lecture Fund 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

Burnap Library Fund 

Andover Savings Bank 

Benjamin Buck Library Fun d 
Andover Savings Bank 

Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



2, 594. 36 
4, 953. 74 



260. 02 



648. 33 



728. 02 



81. 70 
156. 01 



i. 52 



21. 22 



22. 91 



2, 676. 06 
5, 109. 75 



268. 54 



669. 55 



750. 93 



Sears, Cook, Walker-Walker 
School Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

Chester M. Clark Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 

Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 



287. 64 



973. 66 



273. 91 
31, 332. 50 



500. 00 



9. 04 



30. 66 



8. 96 
995. 36 



296. 68 



1, 004. 32 



282.87 
32, 827. 86 



115 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 13, 1959 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes: 

Prior Levies: 

Poll Taxes 1957 
1958 

Personal Property 
Real Estate Taxes 



$443, 778. 80 
277. 34 



1957 
1958 
1956 
1958 



20. 00 
86. 00 
18. 84 
655. 54 
54. 95 
15, 515. 78 



Current Levy: 

Poll Taxes 1959 
Personal Property 1959 
Real Estate Taxes 1959 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Prior Levies 
Current Levy 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Special Assessments: 

Water Assessments Added to Taxes 1958 

Water Assessments Added to Taxes 1959 

Street Assessments Added to Taxes 1958 

Street Assessments Added to Taxes 1959 

Committed Water Int. added to taxes 1958 

Committed Water Int. added to taxes 1959 

Committed Street Int. added to taxes 1958 

Committed Street Int. added to taxes 1959 

Unapportioned Assessments: 

Water Betterments 

Street Betterments 
Water Liens: 

Added to Taxes 1958 

Added to Taxes 1959 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Services 

Charities & Soldiers Benefits A/R's 
General Relief 
Aid to Dependent Children 
Old Age Assistance 

Aid to Highways - State & County: 
County Aid to Highways 
State Aid to Highways 

Unprovided/Overdrawn Accounts: 
Overlay 1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 

Legal Settlements Paid 

Overdrafts /Appropriations 1959 

County Tax Assessments Under -e stimate 

Amounts Certified to Treasurer/Tax Takings 

Disability Assistance - Federal 

Group Life Insurance 

Due from Carter Lecture Fund 

State & County Aid to Highways Revense 
Loans Authorized 

TOTAL ASSETS 



106. 00 
674. 38 
15, 570. 73 



85. 15 
477. 04 
111. 77 
237. 84 
132. 68 
604. 24 

78. 59 
176. 76 



16, 351. 11 



200. 


00 






5,992. 


80 






77, 936. 


31 


84, 129. 


1 1 


3, 300. 


23 






12, 477. 


50 


15, 777. 


73 



37, 789. 41 
5, 774. 81 



532. 19 
349. 61 
736. 92 
255. 35 



74, 506. 


63 


18, 032. 


88 


281. 


80 


1. 393. 


19 


13, 423. 


87 


3, 302. 


47 


2, 832. 


53 


2, 723. 


64 


108. 


14 


3, 446. 


58 


25, 437. 


45 


527. 


45 


886. 


92 


1, 320. 


95 


2,317. 


94 


1, 443. 


97 


21, 586 


60 


403 


52 


87 


00 


1, 880 


13 


148. 


30 


346. 


00 



1 16, 257. 95 
43, 564. 22 



1, 874. 07 

92, 539. 51 
1, 674. 99 
16, 726. 34 

5, 664. 31 

28, 884. 03 



116 



30, 948. 78 

800, 00 
600, 000. 00 

$1, 382, 990. 34 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31. 1959 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



3, 385. 71 

10. 701. 23 
136. 36 



Real Estate Taxes 1957 

Overestimates - County Hospital Assessments 

State Parks Assessments 
Temporary Loans / Anticipation of Reimbursement (Highways) 
Recoveries - Old Age Assistance 
Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Federal Grants - Schools: 

Smith Hughes. George Barden Fund 356. 09 

Public Law #874 11.431.25 

Public Law #85-864 3. 920. 90 

Federal Grants - Charities: 

Aid to Dependent Children - Aid 3. 141. 21 

Aid to Dependent Children - Admin. 244. 50 

Old Age Assistance - Assistance 4. 696. 42 

Old Age Assistance - Admin. 6. 004. 8 1 

Disability Assistance - Admin. 
Agency Accounts: 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Dog Licenses Due County Treasurer 

Blue Cross /Blue Shield Deduction s 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Revenue Reserved until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 

Tax Title Revenue 

Departmental Revenue 

Water Revenue 

Special Assessments Revenue 
Premium - Sale of Bonds 
Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds 
Water Available Surplus 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Road Machinery Fund 
Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 
Redemption of Assigned Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions Duplicated Sales 
Appropriation Accounts - Revenue General: 



15, 708. 24 



14. 223. 30 

1. 638. 95 
43. 75 
8. 30 



15. 777. 73 
43. 564. 22 
5. 664. 31 
18. 401. 33 
94, 413. 58 



Town Clerk 


202 


95 


Board of Health 


1 ,124. 


20 


Fire /Police Station 


1. 200 


00 


Civil Defense 


1. 862 


14 


Chapter 90 Construction 1959 


6. 800 


00 


Tax Title & Legal Assistance 


602 


09 


Inventory Town Owned Equipment 


900 


00 


Construct Dog Pound 


3. 000 


00 


Appropriation Accounts - Non-Revenue Accounts: 






Construct New Police Station 


55, 767 


71 


Public Sewer Mains 


5. 831 


03 


Construct Municipal Garage 


39, 818. 


69 


Fire /Police Building Account 


- 300. 


18 


Additions &t Alterations Jr. /Sr. High School 


23,915. 


71 


Construct Athletic Field 


4, 036. 


61 


Construction of Glen Road School 


66. 881. 


22 


Construction of Wildwood School 


5.299 


55 


Water Betterments 1957 


7, 175 


29 


Water Betterments 1958 


38 


1 1 


West Street Extension. 1955 


8. 


35 


Construct Water Standpipe 




81 


Water Improvements / Barrows Wellfield 


3. 326. 


82 


Develop Additional Wellfields 


51. 582. 


00 



17. 59 
1, 894. 08 
348. 44 
22, 525. 00 
11, 508. 14 
514. 94 
220. 53 
858. 06 



29. 931. 54 



1. 691. 00 
277. 34 



177. 821. 17 
1. 078. 13 
1. 547. 78 
15. 825. 58 
4. 185. 00 
180. 25 
32. 01 
51.81 
201. 74 



15. 691. 38 



Surplus Revenue 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 



263, 982. 08 
232, 606. 75 
600, 000. 00 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



1 17 



;i, 382.990. 34 



ANALYSIS OF 


FEDERAL GRANTS 








Charities; 


Balance s 

as at 
JJ 1 / 59 


Grants 
Received 
in 1959 


Expenditures 
during 
1959 


X-/ O.X CLi 1 V. ^ 

as at 
12/31/59 


^id. to Dependent Cnilaren, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 


720. 1 1 
664. 29 


12 466 70 
1, 587. 55 


10, 045. 
2, 007. 


60 
34 






1, 384. 40 


14, 054. 25 


12, 052. 


94 


3, 385. 71 


Old Age Assistance, Aid 
Old Age Assistance, Adnnin. 


1, 777. 
6, 217. 


33 
54 


41, 004. 51 
3, 760. 97 


38, 085. 
3, 973. 


42 
70 


4, 696. 42 
6, 004. 81 


7, 994. 


87 


44, 765. 48 


42, 059. 


12 


10, 701. 23 


Disability, Admin. 


40. 
171. 


75 
89 


1 , 969. 07 
203. 20 


•3 Q Q n 

238. 


9b 
73 


- 1 , U . J 1 

136. 36 




212. 


64 


2, 172. 27 


4, 128. 


DO 


-1, 743. 95 




9, 591. 


91 


60, 992. 00 


58, 240. 


74 


12, 342. 99 


Schools: 














Smith-Hughes, George Barden Fund 
Special School Acct. /Public Law #874 
National Defense Education/ Public 
Law #85/864 


229. 


09 


127. 00 
17, 040. 00 

4, 002. 90 


5, 608. 
82. 


75 
00 


356. 09 
11, 431. 25 

3, 920. 90 




229. 


09 


21, 169. 90 


5, 690. 


75 


15, 708. 24 


ANALYSIS OF THE BORROWING CAPACITY 
Town of Wilmington, Mass. - Year I960 








BORROWING CAPACITY (Chapter 44, Sec. 10 G/L) 












Valuations 


Abatements 


Net 
Valuations 


1959 Property Valuations 
1959 Motor Vehicle Excise 
1958 Property Valuations 
1958 Motor Vehicle Excise 
1957 Property Valuations 
1957 Motor Vehicle Excise 
Totals 






23, 871, 152 
2, 188, 550 

19, 246, 445 
2, 450, 391 

16, 774, 982 
2, 218, 761 

66, 750, 281 


759, 409 
108, 450 
777, 347 
250, 064 
678, 295 
228, 778 
2, 802, 343 


23, 111, 743 
2, 080, 100 

18, 469, 098 
2, 200, 327 

16, 096, 687 
1, 989, 983 

63, 947, 938 


Average Valuations (3 years) 
5% Legal Borrowing Capacity 








21,315, 979 
1, 065, 799 






FUNDED 


DEBT 








General, Inside Debt Limit 
General, Outside Debt Limit 
Enterprise, Water, G/L 
Total Funded Debt 1/1/60 






809, 000 
2, 030, 000 

368, 000 
3, 207, 000 








AVAILABLE BORROWING CAPACITY 
Requirement Chapter 44, Sec. 7 (25^ 


1/1/60 
- $1, 000 Valuation) 


$5, 967. 78. 






256, 779. 00 



118 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1959 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 



Selectmen, Board of: 
Salary, Clerk 

Rent & Town Meeting Expenses 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing &; Advertising 
Legal Fees 
Travel Allowances 
Supplies, Office 

Election Expenses: 
Wages, Workers 
Printing 

Meals, Workers 

Registrar of Voters: 
Salaries, Registrars 
Salaries, Clerk 
Salaries, Clerical 
Printing 

Services, Census 
Supplies, Office 

Finance Committee: 
Services, Janitor 
Services, Clerical 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing 
Adverti sing 
Postage 

Town Manager: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Secretary 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing &c Advertising 
Travel Allowances 
Supplie s , Office 
Supplies, Library 

Industrial Account: 



Printing 
Advertising 
Travel Allowances 
Contractual Services 
Supplies, Office 

Town Accountant: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Clerical 
Dues 

Travel Allowances 



600. 00 
282. 64 

50. 00 
151. 24 
436. 60 
387. 02 

46. 25 
1, 953. 75 

639. 06 
59. 50 
30. 69 

729. 25 

450. 00 
155. 00 
100. 00 
459. 20 

1, 140. 00 
105. 95 

2, 410. 15 

5. 00 
70. 00 

38. 60 
175. 00 

39. 00 
219. 08 
546. 68 

7, 889. 54 
3, 299. 50 
135. 10 
29. 20 
273. 80 
411. 77 

77. 00 
12, 1 15. 91 

42. 45 
570. 00 
289. 81 
208. 39 

78. 58 
1, 189. 23 

5, 616. 00 
667. 92 
4. 00 
25. 00 



Town Accountant (continued) 
Supplie s , Of f ic e 
Supplies, Library 
Outlay, Office Equipment 

Town Treasurer: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Clerical 
Due s 

Legal Fees 
Recording Fees 
Repairs, Office Equipment 
Supplies, Office 

Town Collector: 

Salary, Administrative 

Services, Deputy Collector 

Due s 

Binding 

Advertising 

Legal Fees 

Recording Fees 

Repairs, Office Equipment 

Supplies, Office 

Town Clerk: 



Salary, Administrative 

Due s 

Binding 

Postage 

Repairs, Office Equipment 

Supplies, Office 

Outlay, Repairs to Vault 

Assessors: 



Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Office 
Salary, Clerical 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Binding 

Recording Fees 
Travel Allowances 
Repairs, Office Equipment 
Supplies, Office 

Town Counsel: 



Retainer 
Legal Fees 

Recording Fees & Costs 
Supplies, Office 



103. 54 
8. 34 
185. 00 
6, 609. 80 

4, 170. 00 
239. 75 
8. 00 



38. 00 
115. 85 
805. 38 
5, 376. 98 

4, 545. 00 
100. 00 

8. 00 
130. 00 
126. 50 

2. 50 
270. 00 

22. 35 
793. 17 

5, 997. 52 

3, 692. 00 
7. 50 

23. 50 


16. 29 
199. 93 
199. 47 
4, 058. 69 

4, 784. 00 

5, 048. 00 

57. 50 
53. 00 


20. 50 
465. 43 

25. 96 
273. 47 
10, 727. 86 

1, 000. 00 
525. 00 
925. 00 
50. 00 

2, 500. 00 



1 19 



Town Hall: Fire Department: 







5, 072. 


16 


OcLlCLx y , 1 li. Ill o L 1 CLLIVC 


6, 149 


nn 


Salaries, Janitor 




1 , 754. 


00 


Salar y , Lie ut enant 


14, 118 


00 


J. S If CL Cl ^ 




1, 281. 


16 


Salary, Firemen 


39,231 


61 






608. 


02 


^ a 1 a y\r \/^a a i r^n T-T^ 1 t~» 
iJCliCti y , V CX-K^ aiL 1\J 11 iiciu 


2 506 


nn 

\J KJ 


' 1 £1 1 O V\ T*» O 




2 , 248. 


36 


^ a 1 a f \r i all ' A/1 n 
O cl 1 d 1 y f ex 1 X S- 1 X C iVi C 1 1 




n^ 


W ate r 




18. 


00 


Tji ip^ .SnViQfr'i Tif 1 on Q 


14 


00 


R *3 T*\a 1 7* c C^i T 1 ^ H. mil T»m n t" 




610. 


34 


^^1^ ci" a cr ^ 


4 




R i T* c T^ni 1 ri i n or 




120. 


42 


y a 1 All r\\x7 a n c 


600 


00 


^1 1 T~>r^l 1 Q ()t t 1 




587. 


63 


\A a 1 Q 
ivi, c a. i. J 


32 


75 


Supplies, Janitor 




40. 


00 


Repairs, Radios 


79 


08 


Suoplie s , Fuel 




471. 


80 


Repairs, Dept. Ec^uipment 


186 


30 


Supplies, Plant 




265. 


70 


Fire Alarm Maintenance 


258 


56 


On t"l ;^ V mil riTn p nt" 




429. 


45 


R p T^a 1 r* Q VpIit r* 1 p q 


738 


50 


Outlay, ^/lajor Repairs 




206. 


45 


.Snnnlip*? Offirp 

I—/ uL./L./XX^ O , V^.* X X X V_ ^ 


48 


97 

7 1 






13, 713. 


49 




4Q? 


60 


Planning Boards 








Supplie s , Rubbe rwear 


289 


64 


PI 1 ^ T'\r \. 1 p Ti r" PI 1 

CL J. CX L y , ^ — ' X ^ X X CI -L 




274. 50 


.Sn r^nl i p ^ .Sm P* 1 1 To ol q F n n i t» 


319 

X 7 


8 1 


Due s 




30. 


00 


Supplie s , Firefighting 


346 


51 


Printing 




447. 


00 


Supplie s , Gas & Oil 


598 


92 


Adve rti sing 




409. 


96 


Suppli e s , ^^e dical & First Ai d 


74 


00 


Recording Fees 




137. 


36 


Supplies, Flashlights &c Batteries 


107 


30 


.^n Tinl 1 p ^ Ot t 1 f p 




64. 76 


C~^^ if1a\;' RarlioQ 

I.XL-LCiy , ivo.U.J.'JO 


498 


50 






1, 363. 


58 


(li 1 t"l a \/' r 1 T*P>Ti QrVil'inQT r. m n 

(ii 1 1" 1 a A/' P'J Af^T*ia1 T-anH^T" 
u.LJ.cLy, i^cj w 1 J. cL J. .i— ' a. uu. cr 1 


1 , 457 
34, 156 


00 
68 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS &c 


PROPERTY; 




Fire Alarm Ext e n sion 


1 , 500 


00 












111, 130 


63 


Police Department: 








A fn Vii i1 a n p ' 






Od 1 d I y , J^UJ 1111113LI dLiVC 




6, 149. 


00 


VV d g t; o , J~y X 1 V t- X s 


1 061 


50 


L7CL±ctl y , kj C 1 ^CdllLo 




14, 118. 


00 


1 ,aimnT"ir at 1 a m n fT 
J— 'dLiXlux y oc v_/xcdiixiig 


57 


88 


Od±dl y f x^dtl Ulllic^li 




38, 990. 


40 


R n a 1 T* G \r Vii r* 1 c 

XV CUdilo, VCllik-XCo 


27Q 


3 1 


S a 1 3 T" \/ \/ a a t" 1 o n T— T 1 




1, 878. 


88 


^nTTril i p Q f^a q 1 

iJvJ.lJlJ±XC O , VJd o ot v...' XX 


159 


67 


kJdi.diy, -L^dllJ.^^ LjULJC^XVXoWi.!3 




4, 050. 


00 


.^llTlTillPQ Aor'PGQOT'lPQ 


14 


56 


k^di-dx o f J— < J^L 1 d 1, dx J. o 




5, 551. 


61 


1— JLILJLJXXC S , XVi, C U X ^ d X UC X X X 9 L ■i^l U 


20 


00 


OdXdxlc^b, XVidLxOIlb 




129. 


00 




1 , Li 


Q? 

7^ 


^ a 1 a T" 'vr 1 1 r* i a 1 
kjdj-d X y , \^ X c X X ^ dx 




1, 560. 


00 


\ c 1 11**=^ Station' 






] '1l IOC Xr ^ 1 1 r~\ C ^ T" 1 T^t" 1 /~\T^ C 

OC O l_l U b 1- XT X L) t X ox 1 o 




29. 


00 


XIj XCl„l,X XL-XLy 


O 1 u 


86 


o 4" ^ <Tf 
x^O bLdgc 




32. 


81 


Tele phone 


440 


68 


T elephone 




906. 


59 


w d te r 


36 




TTawf^l A 1 1 r^w a n G 
X X d V c X .^^-X X \j w d X xk. cr o 




600. 


00 


Rnttl pH Cs7\ 

J— 'kJULXCU v_Jd O 


26 


00 


^^T" 1 G on T* o H 1 n cf \A o a 1 g 

XXOwXXC^X X CCLXXlitd xvx dX o 




51. 


80 


R ^ a 1 c R a ri T ac^ ^1"at"ion 

xXCTLJdXX 5, XrVdUXO X-JdsC C/LdLXL^Il 


23 


74 


Repairs, Radio 




508. 


85 


^n TiTil ipc: TanifoT* 

1^ KJi yj VJ 1. 1. \Z O , \J dlli.LWX 


530 


62 


Repairs, Cruisers 




1, 336. 


85 


LiLILJXX C. O , X. LXC.X 


5 1 


27 


Supplies, Office 




150. 


92 


Supplie s , Building 


1, 721 


43 


Supplies, Uniform? 




857. 


60 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


48 


34 


Supplies, Rubberwear 




14. 


95 




3, 748 


99 


Supplies, Department 




179. 


64 


Civil Defense: 






Supplies, Gas & Oil 




1, 895. 


03 


Telephone 


216. 


37 


Supplies, Tires &; Tubes 




484. 31 


Communications 







Supplies, Batteries 




32. 


76 


Travel Allowances 


72. 


39 


Supplies, Accessories 




6. 


06 


Repair s , Equipment 


270. 


50 


Supplies, Ammunition 




38. 


50 


Supplie s , Office 


11. 


39 


Supplies, Medical & First Aid 




64. 


00 


Supplie s , Depart. T raining 


20. 


00 


Supplies, Flashlights & Batteries 


12. 


00 


Supplie s , Department 


43. 


75 


Const. & Equip. Police Station 


1958 


17. 


20 




634. 40 


Outlay, New Cruisers 




2, 087. 


30 


Constable:- 










81, 713. 


05 


Service s , Administrative 


100. 


00 



120 



Dog Officer: 
Service s 

Travel Allowances 
Housing for Animals 
Disposal of Dogs 

Building Inspector: 
Salary, Administrative 
Electrical Fees 
Plumbing Fees 
Due s 

Travel Allowances 
Supplies, Office 

Board of Appeals: 
Salary, Clerical 
Adverti sing 
Postage 
Telephone 
Supplies, Office 

Sealer Weights & Measures: 
Salary, Administrative 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Department 

Tree Warden: 

Salary, Administrative 

Due s 

Electricity 
Telephone 
Travel Allowances 
Repairs, Equipment 
Repairs, Vehicles 
Supplies, Department 
Supplies, Trees & Shrubs 
Supplies, Gas & Oil 

Dutch Elm : 

Salaries, Tree Workers 
Repairs, Equipment 
Supplies, Department 
Supplies, Chemicals 

Gypsy Moth: 

Salaries, Tree Workers 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Electricity 
Repairs, Equipment 
Supplies, Chemicals 
Supplies, Gas & Oil 

Town Forest : 
Wages 
I Mosquito Control 



Town Engineer; 



Ann 




balary, Administrative 


6, 427. 


00 


360. 


00 


Wages, Engineer's Assistant 


4, 220. 


00 




UU 


Due s 


9. 


00 


J Do . 


UU 


Binding 


Q c c 
3 DD. 


A 

oO 


1 , 1 1 J . 


UU 


Blueprints 


1 3 . 


20 






Recording Fees 


14. 


L 

68 




u u 


Repairs, Equipment 


1 A 

jU. 


J J 


1 "id A 


b 


Supplies, Office 


206. 


8 1 


OJ J , 


u u 


Supplies, Small Tools & Equip. 


^ 1 . 


"i 1 
J 1 


A n 
4U . 


UU 


Supplies, Gas & Oil 


4. 


35 




<iU 




1 1 , 499. 


48 


Q n 


o4 


PUBLIC WORKS: 






o , U i V . 


o9 


otreet oetterments \i7->o;. 








( 3 


oalary & Wages 


1 A A 

1 , UZ9 . 




o 

o . 


UU 


Contractual Services 


1 5. 


70 


10. 


00 


Supplies, Construction 


546. 


42 


o 

L. . 


UU 


Rent, Equipment 


C OCA 


C A 
DU 


d, . 


50 




6, 851. 


34 


1 59 . 


25 


Highway Department: 










Salaries & Wages 


40, 541 . 


98 




UU 


Rent, Buildings 


"7 A 
7U. 


A A 
UU 


57. 


36 


Rent, Trucks 


1 , 188. 


00 


247. 


05 


Rent, Equipment 


4, 430. 


50 


729. 


41 


Electricity 


32. 


52 






Telephone 


190. 


54 


5, 356. 


00 


Water 


20. 


00 


14. 


UU 


Meals 


3 . 


95 


i 3 . 


3iS 


Supplies, Office 


4. 


88 


106. 


Id, 


C 1 ■ TIT" JO 1") 1 T-^ * 1 1 

Supplies, Weed & Brush Killer 


217. 


80 


510. 


76 


Supplies, Rubberwear 


32. 


85 


464. 


05 


Fuel, Heat 


295. 


00 


t;, 1 


7 1 


Small Tools & Equipment 




1 c 


^ . 


c.\) 


1 ; T 1 „ 

supplies, i-.umber 


1 
io. 


be 


319. 




Supplies, Paint, etc. 


3 1 . 


73 


113. 


A A 
UU 


Bulbs & rixtures 


1 . 


"3 A 

30 


D , 7-51. 




H a r dw are 


AO 


D 






Sand, Gravel & Stone 


R A cn 


n 1 
U 1 


z. C f\ 

6, 850. 


54 


Suppli e s , Pat c h 


893. 


1 


247. 


92 


Supplies, Plant Mix 


1 coo 

1 , 528. 


7 1 


49. 


D 1 


Supplies, Tars & Road Oils 


1 A "7 

1 , 897 . 


•7 

78 


842. 


25 


Culverts & Catch Basins 


1 , 323. 


25 


7, 990. 


32 


Fences & Signs 


634. 


06 






Flashlights & Batteries 


4. 


63 


4, 750. 


02 


Outlay, Mechanical Equipment 


2, 483. 


21 


3. 


00 




63, 693. 


42 


13. 


20 


Road Machinery: 






39. 


73 


Wage s 







448. 


00 


Repairs, Equipment 


6, 212. 


40 


43. 


95 


Supplies, Gas & Oil 


4, 382. 


12 


5, 297. 


90 


Supplies, Tires &t Tubes 


1,018. 


01 






Supplies, Batteries 


30. 


00 


147. 


61 


Supplies, Diesel Oil 


108. 


78 


749 


45 


Supplies, Vehicles 


1, 263. 


83 


897 


06 




13, 015. 


14 



121 



Chapter 90 Construction 1958: 
Salary & Wages 
Rent, Equipment 
Supplies, Construction 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 1959: 
Salaries & Wages 
Sand, Gravel & Stone 
Patch &£ Road Oils 

Chapter 81 Maintenance: 
Salaries & Wages 
Rent, Equipment 
Sand, Gravel & Stone 
Supplies, Patch 
Road Oils 

Culverts & Catch Basins 
Signs &; Fences 

Construction of Specified Streets: 
Salaries & Wages 
Recording Fees & Rentals 
Sand, Gravel & Stone 
Curbing 

Tar & Road Oils 
Culverts & Catch Basins 



Construction of Fairmeadow Road: 
Supplies for Construction 

Snow &£ Ice Removal: 
Salaries & Wages 
Rent, Equipment 
Meals 

Repairs, Equipment 
Services, Weather Cont 
Salt & Sand 
Supplies, Gas & Oil 
Supplies, Tires & Tubes 



Public Street Lights: 
Parks: 

Wages, Maintenance of Grounds 
Wages, Police Duty 
Electricity 
Water 

New Tag System 

Supplies, Equipment 

Maint. of Grounds & Fences 

Outlay Beach Equipment 

Outlay Raft Repair 

Outlay Park Equipment 



2, 234. 


65 


4, 126. 


00 


15, 930. 81 


22, 291. 


46 


617. 


63 


1, 166. 


02 


1,914. 74 


6, 398. 


39 


9, 506. 


90 


2, 097. 


50 


4, 89 1 . 


40 


1 , 501. 


69 


6, 255. 


86 


4, 616. 


6 1 


1 , 543. 


54 


30, 413. 


50 


3, 407. 


65 


12, 679. 


99 


2, 037. 


32 


3 , 2"! 4. 


1 


501. 


29 


217. 


58 


22, 057. 


84 


9, 055. 


29 


9, 037. 


00 


2,418. 


75 


17. 


55 


2, 600. 


1 6 


240. 


00 


9, 024. 


27 


966. 


97 


833. 


36 


25, 138. 


06 


13, 494. 


43 


1, 365. 


20 


966. 


00 


11. 


90 


13. 


00 


102. 


05 


80. 


64 


208. 


36 


18. 


00 


137. 


01 


176. 


23 


3, 078. 


39 



Public Sewer Mains: 

Sewerage System: 
Engineering Services 

Cemetery: 
Wage s 
Postage 
Electricity 
T elephone 
Water 

Mileage Allowance 
Repairs, Equipment 
Repairs, Vehicles 
Fuel, Heat 

Supplies, Department 

Construction Supplies, Misc. 

Flowers, Shrubs & Bulbs 

Fertilizers 

Gasoline & Oil 

Supplies, Liners 

Outlay, Mech. Equipment 



Outlay, Catch Basins &t Hot Top 
Cemetery 

WATER DEPARTMENT: 



Water 


Betterments 


1957: 


Water 


Betterment s 


1958: 



Develop Additional Well Fields: 

Water Maintenance: 

Tools & Equipment 

Utilities & Gasoline 

Pipes & Fittings 

Brass Goods 

Station Maintenance 

Station Equipment h. Supplies 

Development 

Office Supplies 

Meters & Meter Parts 

Superintendent's Expenses 

System Maintenance 



Construction of Standpipe 
Hillside Way 



2, 


040. 


09 




200. 


00 


13, 846. 


50 




5. 


60 




14. 


10 




186. 


26 




18. 


00 




56. 


43 




510. 


83 




155. 


91 




126. 


40 




234. 


29 




32. 


17 




1 63. 


00 




100. 


00 




1 69. 


62 




63 1 . 


12 




225. 


00 


16, 


47 5. 


23 


2 , 


333. 


11 




360. 


00 


10, 


128. 


06 




21. 


00 


12, 


569. 


35 


1, 


145. 


19 


12, 


908. 


GO 


1, 


367. 


63 


6, 


141. 


01 


1, 


974. 


59 


5, 


463. 


24 


1, 


709. 


84 


6, 


718. 


24 




611. 


82 


65, 


952. 


42 


116, 561. 


33 



8, 140. 00 



122 



HEALTH & SANITATION: 

Health & Sanitation: 

Salary, Administrative 

Services, Clerical 

Services, Constable 

Salary, Public Nurse 

Salary, Subst. Nurse 

Salary, Medical Agent 

Salary, Animal Inspector 

Rent, Laboratory 

Due s 

Printing 

Binding 

Advertising 

Postage 

Recording Fees 
Mileage Allowances 
Adm. of Housing Account 
Disposal of Animals 
Expenses of Animal Inspector 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Chemicals 
Supplies, First Aid 
Supplies, Medical 
Hospitalization 
Immunization Clinics 
Anti -Rabies Clinic 
Polio Clinic 

» 

Garbage Collection 
Town Dump 

CHARITIES k SOLDIERS BENEFITS: 

Welfare Administration : 

Salarie s 

Rent, Quarters 

Due s 

Postage 

Telephone 

Legal Fees 

Meals 

Repairs, Office Equipment 
Supplies, Vehicle 
Repairs, Vehicle 
Contractual Services 
Supplies, Office 

Welfare Aid: 

Aid to Dependent Children: 







Old Age Assistance: 


58, 044. 


34 






Disability Assistance: 


5, 361 . 


56 


6, 084. 


00 








686. 


75 


Veterans Benefits: 






8. 


00 


Salary 


1 , 040. 


00 


3, 900. 


00 


Postage 


16. 


00 


125. 


00 


T ele phone 


12. 


50 


500. 


00 


Travel Allowances 


144. 


70 


250. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


12. 


45 


200. 


00 


Welfare Aid 


20, 700. 


69 


37. 


10 




2 1 , 926. 


34 


40. 


00 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 






25. 


00 


EDUCATIONAL & LIBRARY 






73. 


50 








15. 


08 


Schools, Educational: 






6. 


08 


Salary, Clerk 


300. 


00 


1, 187. 


56 


Non Salary Items 


590. 


19 


146. 


40 


Supt. Office Salaries 


17, 576. 


68 


150. 


00 


Non Salary Items 


1,717. 


89 


50. 


00 


Salary Attendance Officer 


1, 800. 


00 


151. 


50 


Salaries, Direct. & Super. 


33, 766. 


64 


12. 


87 


Salaries, High School 


246, 063. 


46 


6. 


71 


H. S. Texts & Inst. Aids 


8, 884. 


46 


48. 


42 


H. S. Stationery & Supplies 


13, 204. 


55 


2, 474. 


73 


Salaries, Elementary 


294, 970. 


78 


9. 


00 


Elem. Texts & Inst. Aids 


7, 949. 


41 


306. 


25 


Elem. Stationery &; Supplies 


7, 581. 


71 


296. 


50 


Salaries, Substitutes 


10, 907. 


00 


16, 789. 


95 


Evening School, Exp. of Inst. 


6, 673. 


66 






Salaries, Physicians 


1 , 500. 


00 


9, 450. 


00 


Salaries, Nurses 


7, 900. 


00 






Health Supplies 


534. 


24 


8, 000. 


00 


Mental Health Clinic 


750. 


00 






Utilities, H. S. 


6, 480. 


91 






Utilities, Elem. 


5, 499. 


25 






Bus Transportation 


38, 757. 


50 






Taxi Transportation 


986. 


00 


5, 545. 


72 


Athletic Transportation 


1, 445. 


02 


407. 


72 


Out of State Travel 


427. 


09 


7. 


00 


Lib r ar ie s 


2, 712. 


01 


104. 


80 


Phy. Ed. & Athletics 


4, 546. 21 


238. 


93 


Salary, Cafeteria Super. 


3, 380. 


00 


20. 


00 


Cafeteria Non Salary Items 


6, 573. 


62 


15. 


00 


Special Education Tuition 


500. 


00 


11. 


75 


Educational T. V. 


723. 


25 


111. 


64 


Outlay, New Equipment 


7, 156. 


61 


203. 


16 


Sick Leave, Salaries 


3, 383. 


40 


30. 


00 




745, 241. 


54 


435. 


00 








7, 130. 


72 


Additional School 










Accommodation Committee 


961. 


32 


10, 386. 


50 












Additions & Alterations 






17, 536. 


61 


Jr. /Sr. High School 


133, 423. 


93 



123 




Construction Glen Road School: 

School Operating Plants: 
H. S. Janitors Salaries 
H. S. Extra Help, Wages 
H. S. Repairs, Building 
H. S. Window Cleaning 
H. S. Fuel, Heating 
H. S. Plant Supplies 
H. S. Major Repairs 
Elem. Janitors Salaries 
Elem. Extra Help, Wages 
Elem. Repairs, Building 
Elem. Window Cleaning 
Elem. Fuel, Heating 
Elem. Plant Supplies, 
Elem. Major Repairs 
Salary, Administrative 
Salaries, Maintenance Help 
Telephone, Shop 
Repairs, Shop Equipment 
Repairs, Vehicle 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Supplies, Repairs 
Supplies, Gas h. Oil 
Outlay, Shop Machinery- 
Wages, School Grounds Maint. 
Care of School Grounds 

Vocational Training: 

Tuition Fees 

Travel Reimbursements 

Public Library: 

Salary, Librarian 

Salary, Asst. Librarian 

Wages, Vacation Sub. 

Wages, Janitor 

Services, Clerical 

Binding 

Electricity 

Telephone 

Water 

Repairs, Building 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Library 
Supplies, Fuel Oil 
Outlay, Library Equipment 

Recreation: 
Salary, Director 
Wages, Supervisors 
Utilitie s 

Repairs, Building 
Supplies, Office 



338, 123. 27 



22, 932. 00 
1, 073. 18 
1, 425. 13 
880. 25 
9, 140. 33 

3, 764. 1 1 

4, 230. 70 
24, 545. 16 

1, 321. 20 
2, 467. 64 
445. 56 
10, 743. 41 

4, 740. 00 
11, 033. 92 

5, 720. 00 
14, 300. 00 

121. 75 
36. 34 
146. 07 
140. 71 
486. 41 
119. 83 
373. 24 



Recreation (continued): 
Supplies, First Aid 
Supplies, Playground & Beach 
Supplies, Prize Awards 

Bonds & Insurance: 



Bonds 

Workmen's Comp. & P/L 
Public Liab. Vehicles 
Fire, Theft, Vehicles 
Engineer's Equipment 
Burglary, Office Equipment 
Volunteer Fire Department 
Boiler Insurance 
Fire &; Extended Coverage Bldg. 
Tree Dept. Equip. , Fire, etc. 

Intere st: 



Water Bonds 
Anticipation Notes 
Fire/Police Building 
School Loans 
Street Const. Bonds 
Public Sewer Bonds 
Authen. & Prep, of Bonds 



44. 1: 
198. 6-^ 
75. OC 
6, 356. 9C 



572. 52 
6, 691. 6c 
6, 245. 81 
535. 16 
39. 73 
162. OC 
152. IC 
387. 74 
5, 208. 30 
25. 00 
20, 020. 05 

10, 339. 25 
10, 502. 06 
893. 75 
70, 627. 50 
2, 424. 00 
3, 392. 00 
575 . 
98, 753. 56 



6, 549. 


40 


Maturing Debt: 






1, 963. 


90 


Water Bonds 


50, 000. 


00^ 


128, 644. 


87 


Fire/Police Bonds 


5, 000. 


00 






School Bonds 


175, 000. 


00 


3, 667. 


74 


Street Const. Bonds 


14, 000. 


00 


505. 


50 


Public Sewer Mains 


15, 000. 


00 


4, 173. 


24 


UNCLASSIFIED: 


259, 000. 


00 


3, 610. 


50 








842. 


96 


Training & Conferences &c Out 






122. 


10 


of State Travel: 


738. 


13 


420. 


00 


Town Report 


2, 724. 19 


315. 




Tax Title & Legal Assistance 


989. 


92 


4V. 


08 


Town Clock Repairs 


60. 


GO 


163. 


20 


Unpaid Bills of Previous Years 


3, 844. 


66 


97. 


25 


Reserve Fund 


9, 932. 


33 


18. 


41 


Memorial Day 


750. 


GO 


69. 


98 


Lease of Quarters 


2, 250. 


00 


388. 


78 


4-H Town Committee 


100. 


00 


3, 907. 


71 


Outlay, Road Machinery Equip. 


4, 500. 


00 


155. 


22 


Construct Municipal Garage 


35, 181. 


31 


140. 


00 


Const. & Equip New Police Bldg. 


19, 232. 


29 


10, 300. 


29 


Eminent Domain Takings, Olson 










Road & slopes & drains 


13. 


5G 


850. 


00 








5, 099. 


00 








37. 


83 








28. 


80 








23. 


50 









124 





I, 

Under the provisions of the contract calling for the preparation of a capital budget program for the 
Town of Wilmington for the years 1959-1964, a draft of this work was completed previous to the 1959 Town 
Meeting. Due to the fact that the school facility study had not been completed at that time, and since school 
construction presents the most urgent demand for capital outlay expenditures during the years ahead, and any 
capital outlay program omitting a definitive school construction schedule would be of little value, it was agreed 
to postpone the submission of the capital budget. It was also agreed to update the same so as to provide for 
the years 1960-1965. The following summary of the Capital Budget, so revised, is herewith submitted. 

Wilmington is a town which because of its natural advantages, because of its being in the stream of 
the urbanization of the outlying area of Metropolitan Boston, and particularly due to the progressive and 
sound management of its municipal affairs, has proved attractive to many seeking home sites and industrial 
locations. This has resulted in rapid growth during the past decade. 

Wilmington's growth and expanding population has created numerous problems, the major one being 
the placing of a serious strain upon the town's financial capacity in providing adequate school building faci- 
lities for the present and foreseeable future, and meeting ever increasing annual school operational costs. 

This growth will continue and its continuance will compound the town's existing problems and the de- 
mand for capital expenditures, at least until such time as a balance between home and industrial and com- 
mercial construction has been reached. 

It is fortunate indeed for the Town of Wilmington as well as for each of its property owners who have 
made substantial investments in the Town, that its citizens through the leadership of their elected and 
appointed officials, adopted certain measures to guide and control the Town's development previous to the 
full impact of its rapid growlth. Because of this farsighted action, particularly in the areas of town planning 
and the adoption of desirable zoning and subdivision regulations, the security of Wilmington's future and its 
citizens' investments in it have been strengthened. Had such not been the case, the Town's growth, uncon- 
trolled, could well have been self -de structive and rather than facing problems within the scope of solution, 
the Town could today have been faced with financial disaster. 

As has been mentioned previously, Wilmington has, and will continue to have, problems during the 
immediate years ahead. Their solutions will prove difficult and extremely expensive, cause some temporary 
inconveniences, require some belt -tightening and hard-headed management, and perhaps above all demand 
the patience and understanding of all concerned. 

Since the Town has no problem which could not be solved by a sufficient supply of money, it is obvious 
that at this state of the Town's development, financial planning must join hands with physical planning and 
I become a vital part of the Town's program of development. 

) 

J It is the objective of a continuing Capital Improvement Budget, in tune with regular annual operational 

J budgets and adjusted to the financial capacity of the community, to serve this important need. 

J The amount of money available for capital expenditures during any given year is the amount of money 

J remaining after deducting all ordinary municipal operating expenditures from all anticipated receipts, includ- 
I ^ng those anticipated receipts based upon a predetermined tax rate. This is the sum available to be spent 
^ innually to finance interest and principal payments upon borrowed monies, for cash payments for projects 
:inanced upon a pay-as -you-go basis, or a combination of both. 



It follows that since there is a limit beyond which a tax rate must not go; since there is a limit to 
Jther sources of revenue; and since certain fixed charges must be met annually, there results a limit to ex- 
)enditures which m ay be made for capital improvements regardless of need or desirability. Hence, an order 
>f priority must be assigned to proposed projects. 



125 



1 



This repoi-t is an attempt to schedule projects realistically and suggest methods of financing that wil 
in the end best serve the over-all interests of the Town and its citizens. 



Certain general observations and detailed recommendations dealing with each request for capital 
improvements as anticipated and submitted by each individual responsible department head, board, or 
commission follow: 



To approach a capital improvement program for any community it is necessary to understand the 
community and its past, present, and future trends, for they point out the direction and pattern of its de- 
velopment. It is also necessary to understand the financial structure and capacity of the community for pre 
jects must be scheduled within the financial capacity of the community to pay. 

An early conclusion arrived at from the study of Wilmington's capital needs for the next six years 
and beyond, together with the town's financial resources, its tax base, and rapidly expanding annual budget! 
ary requirements, was that priority must be assigned to the construction needs of the School Department. 
This is unavoidable as long as Wilmington's school population continues to grow through both the influx of 
young families into the community and a continued relatively high birth rate. 

It is apparent that to meet the unavoidable and extremely costly school construction schedule that i 
lies ahead, other capital improvement requirements must be postponed, abandoned, or provided for by 
means other than bond issue. Except to meet the basic unembelli shed requirements for school construction, 
the Town certainly should not add to its already top-heavy debt burden -- one that of necessity rather than 
desirability promises to increase during the next few years. 

Every effort should be made to stabilize the town's debt structure and to program for the gradual rf 
duction of its debt service costs at the earliest possible opportunity. This does not mean that existing and 
future demands for added facilities and improvements must not be met. It does mean that means other than 
borrowing must be employed in order to accomplish their fulfillment and that of necessity their fulfillment 
may be less prompt than many may desire or feel necessary. 

It is also apparent that the ever -inc reasing demands of the School Department for additional annual 
operational funds will exceed anticipated additional tax receipts resulting from the Town's expanding tax ba 
and progressively leave other departments and their vital services ever more tightly pressed for needed ay 
propriations if excessive tax rates are to be avoided. Such has been the trend and there appears little like 
hood for change. 

This leads to the fact that the time has arrived when it is necessary for all departments, particulai 
ly the School Department, to make a thorough reappraisal of their present and anticipated operating pro- 
cedures and objectives in order to initiate savings and so preserve the financial integrity of the Town and 
the financial investments of its citizens. 

In connection with the Town's present debt picture, including the general size of its current debt an 
increasingly burdensome cost of debt service charges and their drain upon the town's tax levy, it is again 
stressed that every possible means should be employed to reduce both the debt and annual principal and in- 
terest payments as soon as possible. Were it possible to eliminate borrowing to an appreciable degree an 
to shorten the term of borrowing on those bond issues undertaken, tremendous savings on interest costs 
could be effected. 



One approach to this problem and one worthy of serious consideration, would be to reserve a majo: 
portion of any new added tax revenue from new industries locating in the Town for required capital improv 
ments. This would mean placing this new revenue in an accumulative stabilization fund from which more 
costly capital improvements might be financed in whole or in part upon a pay-as-you-go or accumulated 
reserve basis. Such a procedure would reduce borrowing, shorten the term of bond issues, and so save 



126 



considerable sums otherwise required for interest charges. Considering that over a twenty-year period, 
with a 4% interest rate, total interest costs for a given project equal 42% of the original cost of the project, 
borrowing proves extremely expensive. For instance, on each $500,000 project, interest costs equal 
$210,000. In other words, by eliminating interest costs, for every three $500,000 projects undertaken, 
the Town could save the entire cost of a fourth $500, 000 project and have $130, 000 left over as a down pay- 
ment on a fifth. The desirability of working towards such an end in the manner described above appears 
obvious . 



Table I which follows lists major requirements for capital expenditures for the years ahead. It 
comprises those additional municipal facilities of a non-repetitious capital nature which it is estimated are 
beyond the town's present financial capacity to finance directly from its tax levy. It will be noted the cost 
of school construction totals $6, 593, 000 with only $500, 000 being tentatively listed for other municipal im- 
provements. 

TABLE I 



SCHOOLS: I960 1961 1962 1964 1965 1966 1967 and after 

Boutwell School 400, 000 

Land Acquisition-Schools 140, 000 

New Intermediate School 1,080,000 

New Elementary School 432, 000 

New Elementary School 432, 000 

New Intermediate ( 10) 540,000 

New Elementary 432, 000 

Intermediate 540,000 1968 

New Elementary 432,000 1969 

Intermediate (add) 540,000 1971 

High School (add) 320,000 1973 

New Elementary 320,000 1975 

Intermediate (add) 540,000 1977 

New Elementary 320, 000 1979 

OTHER: 

Water Supply 125,000 

New Town Hall 300, 000 

New Library 200,000 



665,000 1,080,000 432,000 432,000 540,000 432,000 3,512,000 



The financial impact of the above outlined program is demonstrated by Table II which shows the out- 
standing bonded debt upon December 31st of each year and demonstrates the anticipated growth in the town's 
bonded indebtedness in meeting minimum requirements in the immediate future. 



127 



TABLE II 



Year 


Debt Jan. 1 


Borrowed 


Paid 


Debt Dec. 


1950 


213, 000 


465, 000 


32, 000 


646, 000 


1951 


646, 000 




48, 500 


597, 500 


1952 


597, 500 




48, 500 


549, 000 


1953 


549, 000 


572, 000 


48, 500 


1, 072, 500 


1954 


1, 072, 500 


60, 000 


81, 500 


1, 051, 000 


1955 


1, 051, 000 


700, 000 


84, 500 


1, 666, 500 


1956 


1, 666, 500 


550, 000 


1 19, 500 


2, 097, 000 


1957 


2, 097, 000 


175, 000 


149, 500 


2, 122, 500 


1958 


2, 122, 500 


1, 378, 000 


174, 500 


3, 326, 000 


1959 


3, 326, 000 


140, 000 


259, 000 


3, 207, 000 



1960 


3, 207, 000 


665, 000 


269, 000 


3, 603, 000 


1961 


3, 603, 000 


1, 080, 000 


315, 500 


4, 367, 500 


1962 


4, 367, 500 


432, 000 


347, 500 


4, 452, 000 


1963 


4, 452, 000 




363, 100 


4, 088, 900 


1964 


4,088,900 


432, 000 


358, 100 


4, 162, 800 


1965 


4, 162, 800 


540, 000 


364, 700 


4, 338, 100 


1966 


4, 338, 100 


432, 000 


381, 700 


4, 388, 400 


1967 


4, 338, 400 




398, 300 


3, 990, 100 



Table III which follows gives a listing of the town's annual debt service costs from 1948 through 195": 
md a projection of costs through 1967. A steady climb past the $500, 000 mark will be noted. While pro- 
jections beyond a 6 to 8 year period cannot be forecast with accuracy, from an appraisal of the school study 
and other anticipated town needs, there is little room for optimism and every reason for future budgetary 
caution and the employment of rigid financial management controls. 



TABLE III 



Year 


Principal 


Interest 




Total 


1948 


20, 500 


6, 401 




26, 901 


1949 


23, 500 


6, 201 




29, 701 


1950 


32, 000 


9. 702 




41, 702 


1951 


48, 500 


12, 775 




61, 275 


1952 


48, 500 


1 1, 665 




60, 165 


1953 


48, 500 


18, 420 




66, 920 


1954 


81, 500 


24, 666 




106, 166 


1955 


84, 500 


23, 666 




108, 166 


1956 


1 19, 500 


40, 558 




160, 058 


1957 


149, 500 


54, 288 




203, 788 


1958 


174, 500 


61, 909 




236, 409 


1959 


259, 000 


87, 677 




346, 677 


I960 


269, 000 


91, 108 




360, 108 


1961 


315, 500 


102, 332 




417, 832 


1962 


347,500 


136, 959 




484, 459 


1963 


363, 100 


143, 792 




506, 892 


1964 


358, 100 


132, 675 




490, 775 


1965 


364, 700 


138, 944 




603, 644 


1966 


381, 700 


149, 203 




530, 903 


1967 


398, 300 


154, 109 




552, 409 






128 





Recommendations Based Upon Department Requests 



Public Works: 

This department's major request for capital outlay was presented to the Town Meeting last year and 
fvilfilled when the town authorized a bond issue for the construction of a public works garage. 

In addition to the above request, further information was sought from the department as to its pro- 
gramming of public works activities during the next six years. Except for street and sidewalk construction 
under the Betterment Act, which would be self -liquidating, the anticipated requirements of the department 
represent demands for nearly equal amounts each year. This fact, together with the necessity for reserving 
the town's borrowing capacity to meet school construction requirements, makes it advisable, if not abso- 
lutely necessary, for the town to fit its public works construction and improvement program into the depart- 
ment's annual operating budget as available funds allow. Since this has been the practice in the past, no 
added inconvenience will be experienced. 

The dollar measurement of this department's needs for the next six years were submitted as follows: 





1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


Chap. 90 Const. 


24, 000 


24, 000 


24, 000 


24, 000 


24, 000 


24, 000 


Chap. 81 


29, 000 


30, 000 


31, 000 


32, 000 


33, 000 


34, 000 


Chap. 90 Maint. 


4, 500 


4, 500 


4, 500 


4, 500 


4, 500 


4, 500 


Drainage 


10, 000 


10, 000 


10, 000 


10, 000 


10, 000 


10, 000 


Sidewalk Const. 


1, 500 


2, 000 


2, 000 


2, 000 


2, 000 


2, 000 


Street Const. 


20, 000 


20, 000 


20, 000 








Equip. Replace. 


8, 500 


18, 700 


26, 700 


21, 700 


9, 200 


9, 200 


New Equipment 


6, 500 


12, 800 


2, 500 


1 1, 000 







Since Chapter 90 Construction and Maintenance and Chapter 81 are continuing programs, these items 
will not be considered further at this time other than to recommend that the department at this time prepare 
a six-year schedule of work to be undertaken under this program, street by street, and item by item. By 
so doing a separation will be made between those projects qualifying for this program and others that may 
be the sole responsibility of the town and which must be scheduled in accordance with priorities and accomp- 
lished within budgetary funds available from year to year. By so doing it may well be determined that many 
current street problems fall within the State -Coianty Aid Program and will be met in due course during the 
next few years and that the department's major concern may be that of maintenance. 

With reference to new equipment and replacement of equipment, a balanced program, to be financed 
from current appropriations, and coordinated with the requirements of the other departments, should be 
established. 

Health Department: 

The Health Department has projected the following capital needs: (1) the construction of a Health 
Unit at the cost of $25, 000 in I960; (2) the development of plans for swamp drainage and mosquito control 
in I960 without estimate of cost; and (3) a continuous program of swamp drainage starting in 1961 at an 
estimated cost equal to one dollar on the tax rate. The desirability of these projects is recognized. 

Facilities proposed for the Health Unit include a meeting room with seating capacity for fifty; a 
business office; private conference room; and a laboratory. An overall floor area of 1,400 sq. ft. is felt 
necessary. 

The request for the construction of a Health Unit brings to the fore the pending necessity of consider- 
ing the town's requirements for a Town Hall or Municipal Center which are dealt with in this report. 



129 



It would be most undesirable from a long-range point of view and most uneconomical and inefficient to deal 
with each department's requirements separately and so develop several separate small quarters for various 
activities rather than consolidating them under one roof. For example, a Town Hall would require a meet- 
ing room as would the Library and the Health Unit. Under one roof, properly designed, one such room 
might well serve all three purposes and reduce construction costs two-thirds on just this one item alone. 

It is therefore recommended that the construction of a Health Unit be postponed at least for the pre- 
sent and until such time as the overall necessity for a Municipal Center is determined and consideration is 
given to the purposes which it will serve over the years. 

With reference to the request for the development of plans for swamp drainage and mosquito control 
and a continuing program of drainage, it is felt that for the most part such a program is at this time beyond 
the financial capacity of the Town and must of necessity be postponed. It is possible that private develop- 
ment activities may tend to improve this situation during the years ahead. In the meantime, during the 
course of normal public works programs some corrective action may be possible. Moreover, considera- 
tion could be given to joining with other surrounding communities in the formation of a mosquito control 
project --in all probability the most practical approach to this particular problem. 

Water Department: 

The Water Department in Wilmington is a publicly-owned utility. Like privately-owned utility com-' 
panies, it constitutes a business and should be conducted as such without subsidies from the town's tax levyi 
Rather, it might well be claimed that the Department's income should be such that it could and should pay 
to the Town for tax reduction purposes a sum equal to the tax it would pay were it privately-owned and 
operated. 

As a utility privately owned it would be required to derive sufficient revenue to meet the following 
requirements: I 



1. Meet all operating costs 

2. Meet the costs of all plant improvements and expansion 
either from current income or accumulative reserves 

3. Meet all bond and interest payments on existing debt and 
on all newly created debt where required 

4. Provide a depreciation fund for plant replacement, and 

5. Produce sufficient revenue to pay taxes to the Town upon 
the basis of a fair assessment upon its total value. 



There are other advantages to such an operation. First, the user of the service would pay in direct 
proportion to the benefits received while the non-user would not be required to subsidize the user. Second] 
the Town's tax resources would be relieved of meeting operational deficits and so produce a lower tax rate 
or make additional sums available for other public purposes. 

It is recommended that water rates be adjusted so that receipts from this source together with 
betterments and other service charges would meet the all-inclusive annual operational costs of the depart- 
ment. This adjustment should take place forthwith in order that projects planned for the department in this; 
report will not in the end effect the financial position of the Town. This is necessary if the Town is to mee 
the heavy costs of a continuing school construction program and still endeavor to maintain its competitive 
position, avoid excessive taxation, and make the stabilization of its financial position a possibility in the 
future. It is estimated that an overall increase of approximately 33% in water rates is required to accom- 
plish this objective. 

With reference to capital needs, the Water Department has listed the following: (1) the provision 
of a new well field and appurtenances - $150, 000 over the two-year period 1959-1960; (2) main extensions 
under betterments, $30, 000 for the next six years; and (3) exploration and testing for well fields, general 

130 



improvements to system, and replacement of inadequate mains ,$ 1 00 , 000 spread over the six-year period. 
With reference to new well field expansion, during 1959 a balance of bond issue money originally made avail- 
able for the construction of a standpipe was employed in this connection. Permanent financing by bond 
issue in I960 for the balance of the cost, estimated at $125, 000, should follow and is so scheduled. As 
previously pointed out, it is recommended that the interest and principal costs for this project be met ex- 
clusively from increased departmental receipts. 

With reference to the betterment program, it is not possible to determine future demand, and, since 
such projects are self -liquidating , they have not been projected in this report. 

With reference to the request for the expenditure of $100,000 over the next six years for general im- 
provements, it is recommended that the cost of this program be financed from the annual operating budget. 
It is further recommended that a listing of these projects be developed and an order of priorities be estab- 
lished and the program paced and carried out in accordance with the department's ability to pay from cur- 
rent revenues. 

Fire Department: 

The Fire Department has submitted as its capital needs the following: (1) the construction of a new 
sub-station in North Wilmington at the cost of $20, 000; and (2) a new 750 gallon pumper at a cost of $20, 000. 
Both projects are requested for schediiling in I960. (Notation was made that the Department would request 
an increase of $28, 456 in its annual operational budget in order to maintain and man the new sub-station). 

In addition to the capital requests of the Department, a list of present equipment, its age, and con- 
dition was obtained from the Fire Chief together with a list of what he determined necessary in the foresee- 
able future in order to further appraise the capital needs of the community. 

The needs of the department for the next twenty years as expressed by the Fire Chief are as 

follows: 

1 Ladder Truck 2 Brush Fire Trucks 

3 Pumpers (750 gal. cap. ) 1 Ambulance 

Present equipment in quantity and type, as listed in the table below, meet the above requirements: 

Yr. of Purchase Yr.for Replace. 



Ladder Truck 1958 1978 

International 750 gal. Pumper 1955 1975 

Mack 750 gal. Pumper 1940 1965 

Chevrolet 500 gal. Pumper 1938 I960 

Brush Fire Truck 1957 1972 

Brush Fire Truck 1949 1964 

Ambulance 1956 1966 



It is recommended that the department's requests as presented be dealt with in the following manner: 
Since it appears at this time that the construction of a new fire station in North Wilmington would not reduce 
insurance rates and so benefit property owners, it is recommended that for the time being present garaging 
and manning procedures be continued. It is further recommended that the 1938 Chevrolet 500 gallon Pumper 
be scheduled for replacement by a 750 gallon Pumper in I960, cost to be provided from the current tax levy. 
It is further recommended that the 1949 Brush Fire Truck be scheduled for replacement by the same method 
in 1964. In the meantime, the question of constructing a new sub- station in North Wilmington should be kept 
in mind as a future need of the Town. However, before any definite plans are developed, consideration 
shoxild be given to the fact that with the construe tion of a new public works .garage, certain of the activities 
of the Water Department should be transferred to this new facility. By so doing, adequate garaging for the 
North Wilmington fire equipment could well be provided for by the present Water Department facilities with- 
out incurring costs of new construction. 

131 



Library Department: 



The Library Department, projecting a popiilation of $15,000 by 1964, estimates that its present facii 
lities should be expanded by two and one-half to three times at a cost of not less than $200, 000. In their 
proposed project report, 1964 has been designated as the year for action. Plans for this capital improve- 
ment have not progressed beyond a tentative determination of need. 

It is recommended that in 1963 or 1964 a nominal s\im be appropriated from the tax levy for the pur 
pose of employing the services of a practical library consultant experienced in the field of library operation 
or that the Planning Board add the library question to its future Title VII planning studies for the purpose o* 
determining the realistic library service requirements of the Town together with space needed. This ser- 
vice should not cost in excess of $1, 500 or $2, 000. The product of such a survey would be invaluable in th« 
furtherance of plans for actual future construction. 

It is further recommended that plans for the future construction of library facilities be coordinated 
and incorporated with plans for the new Mvmicipal Center referred to in this report, should it be determine 
that the need for such a facility is a necessary capital improvement to be scheduled for the future. In any 
event, the scheduling of the library project must of necessity be projected beyond the year 1965, 

Municipal Center: 

The future need for the expansion of the facilities of the Town's miinicipal building has not been sub- 
mitted as a pending capital project. It would appear, however, that while the Town has demonstrated con- ! 
siderable ingenuity in adapting its present building to meet expanding requirements, it today falls far short' 
of meeting reasonable standards. It is felt that the construction of a new town hall will soon become an 
urgent need. 

The consideration of this problem is fundamental to the consideration of other requests being made 
at this time such as health facilities, a new library, and facilities for the Engineering Department in a new 
public works building. It would be unfortunate for the Town to deal with these problems piece-meal and so 
disperse its departments by providing numerous small separate facilities rather than consolidating them 
under one roof where coordination would be possible, and the scheduled use of joint facilities might elimin- 
ate costly duplication. 

While it is not anticipated that the Town will construct a new Mvmicipal Center within the next two oh 
three years, it is a certainty that Wilmington will hopelessly outgrow its present building within a short I 
time. Now is the proper time to consider this problem. I 

Without having made a study of the problem, it is felt that it would be desirable to locate the officesB 
of all riiiinicipal departments in such a building and to incorporate into the building, or in conjunction with ifl 
the facilities of the Library. ■ 

It is recommended that serious thought and preliminary plans and estimates be developed for the ■ 
project within the next two or three years in order that the Town may be prepared to act when the time I 
comes -- and so that the Town may be in a position to act wisely upon requests for additional departmental B 
facilities that should be located under its roof. 

Planning Board: W 

The Planning Board has submitted the following proposed capitad project: an expenditure of $5, 000 
in I960 to complete its planning program, and a contract entered into with the Massachusetts Department o 
Commerce whereby under Title VII an equal sum of money has been made available as a matching fund by 
the Federal Government. Upon the basis of past accomplishments of the Board in the planning field and the 
resulting benefit to the Town and its future, it is recommended that the Board's prograjn be continued, the 
s\im requested to be appropriated from the current tax levy. With reference to planning and development, 



132 



no requests for capital outlay were submitted by the Urban Renewal Authority. Urban Renewal could and 
should play an important roll as an aid in the future development of the town. It is felt that in promoting the 
town's overall planning and development program that it would prove a most helpful technique if planning 
for urban renewal was integrated with the overall planning and development of the town and undertaken by 
the town' s planning agency. 

Park and Recreation: 

In its capacity as the Town's Park Commission, the Planning Board has requested the following capi- 
tal projects: (1) a land-taking for Silver Lake Beach; (2) a land-taking for Fosters Pond Beach; and (3) 
the provision for added parking facilities at Silver Lake. No estimates or plans have been advanced for 
these projects. The current planning contract calls for a complete study of the future recreational needs of 
the Town, and this study has now been completed. 

Recreation facilities are usually one of the first items eliminated from a capital budget program 
since there are always items that appear more urgent. From a comprehensive view, however, the attrac- 
tiveness of a community and the provision for various types of recreation facilities partially fulfill the ameni 
ties desired by the townspeople and at the same time contribute to the maintenance of property values. 
Wilmington still has resources available to fulfill its recreational needs. With current development trends, 
these resources will not be available in the future when they will be more urgently needed than today. High 
land costs and intense development will eliminate the opportunity for site acquisition with natural features 
available. The retention by the Town of all tax title properties as specified in the "Final Community Faci- 
lities Study and Plan" is a necessity for effectuation of the program. It is, therefore, reconnmended that 
schediiling of the recreation projects determined desirable be established and incorporated in the Capital 
Budget when it is reviewed for 1961. 

Lastly, it is recommended that this capital budget program be continued, improved, and that annual 
capital budget reports be made jointly by the planning and fiscal agencies to the Town Meeting as an integral 
part of each year's town budget. In regard to fiscal planning and policy, only through continuous year-in, 
year-out adherence to some basic long-range objectives can a Town hope to achieve a measure of financial 
solvency and stability. An annual town capital budget is good administration and is wise insurance for all 
its citizens -- individual and corporate alike. 

j|c s!c :{c 5!< s}: >[c 51: 

Though the years immediately ahead will prove difficult, as this report indicates, Wilmington has 
every reason to look to the future with confidence and optimism. To be sure, this confidence and optimsm 
is contingent upon the future course of action that the citizens of the Town may take and depends upon the 
degree to which they may elect to follow the excellent overall patterns established during recent years. 
Should the citizens choose to adhere to their recently developed courses of action, which are representative 
of objective, forward-looking, well-planned, and a prudent conduct of mxmicipal affairs, the Town's pros- 
perous future is assured. 

Of utmost importance, from an overall point of view, Wilmington is in the fortunate position of 
being able to plan and build the type of community it desires. Thus, it is in a position of maintaining con- 
trol of its own destiny rather than being in the position of endeavoring to salvage what it can from the wreck- 

Wilmington can and must maintain its current qualities and indeed strengthen them. By so doing it 
can establish itself as a model community with economic balance and financial stability --an ideal town in 
which to live, work, and invest. 



133 



Due to numerous plus factors enjoyed by few other communities, Wilmington has every reason to 
expect continued growth and expansion of its tax base. As a result of the solid foundation which the citizens 
and their elected and appointed officials have, to their collective credit, constructed, such as the establish- 
ment of excellent zoning and subdivision regulations, the town's school construction program, the avail- 
ability, reservation, and protection of areas for industrial development, and the good fortune of being the 
beneficiary of a strategically located highway system, the town should experience substantial industrial ex- 
pansion and so balance out its residential growth and its resulting demands upon the tax rate. Here lies 
the town's greatest, if not sole opportunity to stabilize its financial position and resulting tax rate at a rea- 
sonable and competitive level while still maintaining adequate services and fulfilling its capital needs. 

Presuming that this opinion and others expressed in this conclusion are correct, it is imperative 
that Wilmington protect and further promote its competitive position and continue its current policies and 
program with vigor. In addition, even greater effort must be made to attract desirable industry to the towr 
and consideration should be given to the desirability of reserving added strategically located areas for in- 
dustrial development. 

To be sure, to protect and to further develop the Town's attractiveness to industrial investment 
capital some inconveniences, some delaying of desired capital improvements, some hard-headed manage- 
ment of the Town's affairs and budget belt -tightening will have to be experienced and taken with good grace 
by its citizens. This seems a small price to pay for the future general welfare and prosperity of the Town 
of Wilmington and its people. 

There seems to be no alternative to this course of action since to act otherwise would in all prob- 
ability close the door to future industrial growth and thus place upon the shoulders of residential property 
owners excessively burdensome taxation which could well exceed their capabilities to pay, for residential 
property standing by itself is not self-supporting. 

It is felt that this initial capital improvement program and the recommendations contained in this 
report, if followed in substance, will achieve the major objectives of the Town, preserve its advantages, 
promote its future development in accordance with sound planning, and establish financial stability. 

As has been mentioned previously, Wilmington has, and will continue to have, problems during the 
immediate years ahead. Solutions will prove difficult and expensive, cause some temporary inconvenience 
and more important demand the patience and understanding of all concerned. 

FUTURE REQUIREMENTS FOR WILMINGTON SCHOOLS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

During 1958 The Planning Board commissioned Economic Development Associates, Inc. , planning 
consultants of Boston, through the Massachusetts Department of Commerce, to perform studies concerning 
Wilmington's School and Recreational facilities and to make appropriate planning recommendations. Since 
that time the Consultants and the Planning Board have worked closely together and enlisted the willing co- 
operation of town officials and citizens in a process that has evaluated the existing facilities, projected the 
future requirements, and planned accordingly. i 

This process began with an examination of the physical characteristics of Wilmington, and led to 
the division of the town into thirteen selected study areas defined by existing and/or natural boundaries whi 
were then examined in detail in conjunction with available studies, reports, statistics, etc. , and supple- 
mented by field survey. The collated information thus acquired was edited and recorded on a series of 
maps (scale: one inch equals six hundred feet). 

A study was made of the town's population, past, present and projected, which was then related to 
Wilmington's population location and density, and evaluated in terms of factors encouraging and limiting 
population expansion by area. This was further refined to produce an ultimate pupil population figure from 
which the future school needs were ascertained. 



134 



Similar techniques were used for survey, analysis and projection of Wilmington's Recreational 
Facilities with the significant use of the added data produced during the population study and concomitant land 
use study. This examination and consideration revealed the probable nature and scope of future demands for 
schools and recreational facilities in Wilmington and provided the basis for planning to meet those demands. 
Specifically, the work accomplished to achieve this included: 



Schools: 

1. A review and analysis of past and current school studies - materials pertaining to all 
previous studies were furnished by the Town Manager and Superintendent of Schools. This 
material was discussed and evaluated at length with interested and knowledgeable Wilmington 
repre sentative s . 

2. The town was then divided into thirteen specific study areas. These areas were deter- 
mined by the existance of natural or man-made barriers such as brooks and streams, 
highways, railroads, or other factors tending to separate the town into natural neighbor- 
hoods calling for separate school facilities. 

3. An analysis of present school enrollments and a determination of projected school 
enrollments as related to land use and population projections was completed for each of 
the areas. In this connection a detailed analysis of potential land use development for 
residential purposes was made. 

4. An evaluation of present school facilities was made to measure their adequacy in 
meeting the long-range educational needs of the town. Each school was inspected and 
evaluated upon the basis of physical condition, location and adequacy of the site, and 
then classified in three categories; those that should be considered for permanent use; 
those that should continue in use upon a comparatively short-range basis; and those 
whose continued use should be considered as an emergency measure. 

5. Upon the basis of the data obtained from the above studies and analyses, and upon 
the basis of the establishment of the eventual programming of school facilities pro- 
viding for elementary schools comprising grades 1 through 6, intermediate schools 
comprising grades 7 through 9, and a high school comprising grades 10 through 12, 
the future classroom requirements of the town, their approximate location, and 
estimated year of need, was established. 

Recommended as best meeting the ultimate requirements of the town are ten elementary schools, three inter- 
mediate schools and one high school. The ten elementary schools should average twelve rooms each the 
intermediate schools twenty rooms each, and the high school approximately fifty classrooms. The map on 
page 136 graphically depicts the program. 

Recreation: 



In the conduct of the study to determine the recreational needs of the town, present and future, data 
obtained in the course of the school study was utilized and the two programs were co-ordinated in order to 
provide maximum facilities at minimum cost. 

Existing facilities and their use were evaluated. Then based upon the considerations of the nautral 
characteristics of the town, ultimate density of population, and the trend towards more leisure time, a pro- 
gram for the future development of recreational facilities was prepared. In summary, it is recommended: 

1. That the Silver Lake Beach facility be expanded to adequately accommodate the 
citizens of the town. 

2. That a central park be developed on and around the present Rotary Park. 



135 



3. 



That Foster Pond be developed as a boating area. 



4. That in conjunction with the construction of the three proposed intermediate schools 
that major playground facilities be provided for in connection therewith. 

5. That as new elementary schools are constructed adequate neighborhood playground 
facilities be provided at such locations. 

6. That all major tracts of open lands now held by the town in tax title, or lands that 
may be acquired in this manner in the future, be retained in proposed green belt 
zones and dedicated to public recreational use. Particular reference is made to 
low lands bordering upon brooks and streams. 



In connection with recreation and the acquirement of recreation facilities, it is common for munici- 
palities to defer action upon the premise that other matters are more important, or due to the fact that built- 
in pressures for action in other directions are greater. Such action has many times proved to be to the long 
range disadvantage of those communities. Many times it has been discovered too late that recreational need 
that could have been provided at minimum cost some years previous must be foregone entirely due to in- 
creased land values and encroaching developments that have taken place in the interim. 




136 



FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



Main and Church Sts. 
Main St. and Middlesex 
Ave. 

Main and Clark Sts. 
Washington Ave. 
Clark St. and Railroad 
Ave. 

Ma.in St. and Bridge 
Lane 

Brand Ave. and Wiser St. 
Baker St. and Taplin 
Ave. 

Philips Ave. and Wild 
St. 

Main St. and 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Main and Harnden Sts. 
Harnden Sl and Glen Rd. 
Glen and Miller Rds. 
Glen Rd. and Jones Ave. 
Main St. and Grove Ave. 
Grove Ave. and 
Cottage St. 

Mildred Rogers School 
Grove Ave. and Wlnchell 
Rd. 

Grove Ave. and Lake St. 

Main and Lake Sts. 

Fitz Terr. 

Warren Rd. 

Main St. and Fairfield 

Rd. 

Fairfield and Faulkner 
Rds. 

Main St. Tewksbury 
Line 

Shavtrsheen Ave. and 
Shawsheen Rd. 
Shawsheen Ave. and 
Grand St. 

Grand and Birch Sts. 
Shawsheen and Nassau 
Aves. 

Nassau Ave. and Dutton 
Rd. 

Shawsheen Ave. and 
Carter Lane 
Shawsheen Ave. and 
Aldrich Rd. 

Aldrich Rd. and Hardin 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. and Boutwell 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. and Forest 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. and Winston 
St. 

Aldrich Rd. Billerica 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Cranberry Bog. 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Bond St. 
Shawsheen Ave. 
Hopkins St. 
Hopkins Sl Billerica 
Line 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Nichols St. 



and 
and 



and 



1385 Nichols St. Billerica 
Line 

139 Shawsheen Ave. 
Billerica Line 

211 Burlington Ave. and 
Harris St. 

2112 Cedar St. and Burt Rd. 
2114 Ceder St. and Oak Ct. 

212 Burlington Ave. and 
Chestnut St. 

2122 Chestnut St. and Butters 
Row 

2124 Chestnut St. and Mill Rd. 

2125 Mill Rd. Burlington Line 

2127 Chestnut St. and Hillside 
Way 

2128 Hillside Way Burlington 
Line 

2129 Chestnut St. Woburn 
Line 

2133 Marion and Clifton Sts. 
2136 Marion St. (Between 
Clifton and Chestnut 

Sts.) 

214 Burlington Ave. and 
Boutwell St. 

2141 Boutwell St. and Taft Rd. 

2142 Boutwell St. and 
Roosevelt Rd. 

215 Burlington Ave. and 
Swain Rd. 

2151 Swain and Taft Rds. 
216 Burlington Ave. and 

Beach St. 
£17 Burlington Ave. and 

Forest St. 
2171 Forest St. and Swain Rd. 
2173 Forest St. and Pershing 

Rd. 

311 Main and Lowell Sts. 

312 Main St. and Butters 
Row. 

3121 Butters Row (Between 
Chestnut St. and Main 
St.) 

Memorial Park 
Greer Company 
Main and Eames Sts. 
Fames St. R.R. Crossing 
Raffi & Swanson Co. 
Main St. and Cook Ave. 
Main St. Woburn Line 
Lowell and Parker Sts. 
and 



313 
314 
315 
3151 
3152 
316 
317 
32 
3212 

321 
322 
3231 
3232 

3233 

3234 
3235 

324 
3241 

3242 



Blackstone 



and Cross Sts. 
and Bay Sts. 
and Elm Sts 



Parker 
Sts. 
Lowell 
Lowell 
Woburn 
Woburn St. and 
Brentwood Ave. 
Woburn St. and Morse 
Ave. 

Woburn and Eames Sts. 
Woburn St. Woburn 
Line 

Lowell and West Sts. 
West St. and WestdaJe 
Ave. 

West and Grove SU. 



3243 Grove St. Reading Line 

3244 West St. and Suncrest 
Ave. 

3245 West St. Reading Line 
325 Lowell St. Reading Line 

41 Church St. Fire House 

42 Church and Columbia 

Sts. 

43 Church and Beacon Sts. 

431 Walker School 

432 Beacon St. and Fairview 
Ave. 

433 Fairview Ave. and 
Adams St. Ext. 

44 Church and Clark Sts. 
441 Clark St. and Middlesex 

A^;e. 

45 Church St. and Thurston 
Ave. 

46 Chtirch and Adams Sts. 

461 Middlesex Ave. and 
Adams St. 

462 Adams St. and Adams 
St. Ext. 

47 5enior High School 

48 Church St. and 
Middlesex Ave. 

481 School St. and Junior 
High School 

482 Buzzell School 

483 Center School 

51 Middlesex Ave. and 
Wildwood St. 
511 Wildwood St. (Near 
A. S. Hudson) 

512 Wildwood St. (Near Vets. 
Housing) 

513 Wildwood and Woburn 
Sts. 

521 Glendale Circle 

522 Glen Rd. R. R. Crossing 

525 Glen Rd. and King St. 
5253 King and Bartlett Sts. 

526 Glen Rd, and St. Paul St. 

53 Middlesex Ave. Town 
Hall 

54 Middlesex Ave. and 
Federal St. 

541 Federal and Concord 
Sts. 

5412 Concord and Woburn 
Sts. 

5413 Woburn St. (Near 
A. S. Eames ) 

5414 Concord St. No. ReatUng 
Line 

542 Federal and Grant Sts. 
544 Federal and Lincoln St*. 

546 Federal and Liberty SU. 

547 Woburn and Federal 
Sts. 

548 Woburn and West SU. 

55 Middlesex and Mystic 
Aves. 

56 C. S. Harriman Tannery 

57 Whitefield School 

571 Shady Lane Drive and 
Oakdale Rd. 



572 
58 
581 

59 

£91 
592 
593 
594 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

651 
67 

68 

681 

682 

683 

684 

69 
691 

692 

693 

694 

71 
711 

714 

72 
73 

2 

22 

3 
4 
7 
8 
10 
666 



Shady Lane Drive and 
Lawrence St. 
Middlesex Ave. and 
North St. 

North St. (Between 
Middlesex Ave. and 
Dadant Drive) 
Middlesex Ave. and 
High St. 

High and Woburn Sts. 
Woburn and Park Sts. 
Park and Gowing Sts. 
Park St. No. Reading 
Line 

Middlesex Ave. and 
Salem St. 
Salem St. R. R. 
Crossin-i (Portland) 
Salem St. R. R. 
Crossing (Lawrence) 
Salem and Cunningham 
Sts. 

Salem St. and Silver 

Lake Rd. 

McDonald Rd. 

Salem St. Tewksbury 

Line 

Salem and Ballardvale 
Sts. 

Ballardvale St. (Near 
R. R. Bridge) 
Ballardvale St. (Neat- 
Friends Farm) 
Ballardvale St. (Near 
Thomas Morely) 
Ballardvale St. Andover 
Line 

Salem and Andover Sts. 
Andover and Woburn 
Sts. 

Andover St. and Upton 
Ct. 

Andover St. (Near 
T. C. Daley) 
Andover St. Andover 
Line 

Salem and Woburn Sts. 
Woburn St. and 
Hathaway Rd. 

and Sheridan 



Town Dump 
No. Reading 



Hathaway 
Rd*. 

Salem St. 
Salem St. 
Line 
All Out 

No School (7:00 & 7:15 
A.M.) 

Special Call 
Special Call 
Police Call 
Boy Scouts 
Out of Town 
Civil Defense 



POLICE AMBULANCE FIRE 

Numbers Numbers Numbers 




FOR INFORMATION ON: 


A T T 

CALL 




JJJljJr'AK i Mil. In i 


Aid to Uependent v-/niiaren • 


fi '?9 1 1 




Welfare Department 


Assessments 


0-3314 




Board of Assessors 


Bills and Accounts 


Q Olio 




Town Accountant 


Birth Certificates 


0-33 1^ 




i own Uierk 


Board of Selectmen 


o - 33 1 4 




t^ierK oi rioara 


By-Laws 


Q 11 ^ "> 
o-5i Ic, 




Town Clerk 


Cemetery 


O - J7 U 1 




Cemetery Department 


Civilian Defense 


Q 1 Cti L 

o- ioob 




Director of Civil Defense 


Civilian Defense 


o - o U f 1 




Headquarte r s 


Complaints (general) 


O - 5i 1 i 




Town Manager 


Construction 


Q •Jill 




Building Inspector 


Contagious Diseases 


O - J J i J 




iDoaru oi rlealtn 


Dead Animal Removal 


O- D i f U 




Dog Officer 


Death Certificates 


Q 11 X "i 




Town Clerk 


Disability Assistance 


Q 7 9 11 




Welfare Department 


Engineering 


Q 1111 
O - J J 1 i 




Engineer 


Elections 


Q 1119 
O - D D i. L. 




Town Clerk 


Employment, Town 


Q 1111 
O - J -} 1 1 




Town Manager 


Entertainment Permits 


Q 1 1 1 /t 




Board of Selectmen 


Fire 


Q 1 9 n n 




Fire Department 


Food Inspection 


o - 33 i 3 




T~) 1 r T T T J 1 

Board oi Health 


Fuel Oil Storage 


8-3346 




Fire Department 


Garbage Collection 


0-33 1 3 




Board OI rieaitn 


rlealtn ^general; 


O 1111- 

o - 33 1 3 




rioard oi rlealtn 


Immunization Clinics 


8-3313 




Board of Health 


J-«egai Matters 


O 9 A O ^ 

o-ZOZo 




Town Counsel 


T ' I- — 

Library 


8-Z967 




Public Library 


Licenses and Permits 


8-3312 




1 own Clerk 


Maps (official) 


8-33 12 




Town Clerk 


Milk Inspection 


8-33 13 




Health Department 


Old Age Assistance 


8 -ZZ 1 1 




Welfare Department 


Parks and Playgrounds 


Q 1 O A 1 

O - jVU 1 




Cemetery Department 


Planning Board 


O 11 \ \ 

0-331 1 




Agent (Town Engineer) 


Police 


8-3331 




Police Department 


Property (1 own Owned) 


8-33 14 




Board oi Selectmen 


Property ( i ax iitle) 


0-33 13 




Town Treasurer 


Purchasing 


8-3313 




Purchasing Clerk 


Recreation Programi' 


Q 9 n C 9 

o -ZUdZ 




Director of Recreation 


bchools 


8-2052 




Superintendent oi Schools 


Sewage Permits 


8-3313 




J r TT 1*."L 

Board of Health 


btreet Lights 


8-3311 




1 own Manager 


Street Maintenance 


o -44o 1 




Highway Department 


Taxes 


8-3314 




Board of Assessors 


Tax Collection 


8-33 IZ 




1 ax Collector 


Trees 


o -Zo09 




Tree Warden 


Veterans Benefits 


8-2514 




Veterans Agent 


Veterans Housing 


8-8531 




Housing Authority 


Veterans Services 


8-2514 


r 


Veterans Agent 


Vital Statistics 


8-3312 


Town Clerk 


Voting, Registration, etc. 


8-3312 




Registrars of Voters 


Water 


8-4711 




Water Department 


Welfare, Public 


8-2211 




Welfare Department 


Wire Inspection 


8-3313 




Building Inspector 


Zoning 


8-3313 




Building Inspector 



WfFllS PiNDERY INC. 
ALltiAlw, MAoS. 
MAY 1971